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  Click here to go to the first staff post in this thread.   Thread: Learning to create

  1. #1

    Learning to create

    Hello all- to sum this all up in the first couple of lines. I want to learn how to draw!

    All in all, I have always loved drawing. I used to draw a lot when i was young, i was never very talented, but i enjoyed doing so. however, as i got older i drew less and less,.... and now i kinda just do the odd doodles here and there.

    One of the problems is, I have no idea what to draw.
    I lack inspiration. and even if i had it, im not really good at drawing anyway.


    but it is something i want to do, and i enjoy it, even knowing the end results will never hang in a gallery

    i watch youtube videos of learning how to draw, but in the end it jsut become copies of waht they are doing, and i want to learn how to put my own mind down on paper,..not others.


    i use the draw something app every now and then, and while its simple, and the end results i end up with very basic, it still has been a good trigger in creating something out of my own mind fast and effortless. But, in the end you just end up getting the same words over and over again.

    so what ive discovered is that for myself, it's the challenge from others to draw something i cant decide over myself, that works as a good trigger.

    does something like that a "draw this challenge" group exist on this page, or on other art pages?

  2.   This is the last staff post in this thread.   #2
    feline fine Noxid's Avatar
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    I can't think of anything specific here off the top of my head. Someone tried to do a palette challenge thread with the idea to use swatches from http://www.colourlovers.com/ with maybe some sort of theme, but the thread didn't really take off. There's also seasonal things people do like Inktober and cat month. And I've seen a few 100-theme challenges go by in my time browsing.

    So whichever kind of thing you'd like to do is up to you really. When I started out I did a 100 Cats thing loosely based off of this because I'm a huge cave story nerd. So whatever works for you, really is what is best I think.

  3. #3
    I have a few questions before I provide some advice:

    What do you think about when you have absolutely nothing else to think about, (i.e. when you are trying to fall asleep or waiting in line).

    What type of career do you want to get into? What interests you the most or sounds like the most fun? (If it's not drawing, that's okay. It's important to dig deep.)

    What other hobbies do you have besides drawing?

    How much time can you put into drawing each week? How much money can you put into drawing each month?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Metsys View Post
    I have a few questions before I provide some advice:

    What do you think about when you have absolutely nothing else to think about, (i.e. when you are trying to fall asleep or waiting in line).

    What type of career do you want to get into? What interests you the most or sounds like the most fun? (If it's not drawing, that's okay. It's important to dig deep.)

    What other hobbies do you have besides drawing?

    How much time can you put into drawing each week? How much money can you put into drawing each month?
    I am a teacher (if i were to take my education all over again, not being sick- and everything giving a good salary)
    I would probably want to become a vet. or one of those people making jewelry (dont know what they are called in english), i just hit 30. however when i grew up we never had any art education at school. we were jsut handed paper and were told to draw. and thats it.
    however i am sick, and do not work anymore. my illness also makes me houmebound a lot.
    i usually dont have nothing to think about. my sickness makes me very tired, so i either sleep, or am awake, and when im awake i always try to do all the things im not able to when the fatigue is at its worst.

    i love reading, watching films and playing games.
    i hike a bit when the health alows for it, i like animals in general, and we have several dogs.

    when im trying to sleep and cant (which is usually very rare as i try to use all my up and about time to do the stuff i like) i tend to create fantasy worlds and imagine myself living in them. like how it would be to be an indian, how it would be to live in that or that book/film/game universe etc.

    if i wait in line im kinda just annoyed i haveto wait, and wanting it to be faster:p

    I want to put as little money as possible into it.
    i like drawing digitally as i only need my tablet then (i have a wacom i got used and cheap) and i have several programs to use aswell, altho i need to learn how to use them properly.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Noxid View Post
    I can't think of anything specific here off the top of my head. Someone tried to do a palette challenge thread with the idea to use swatches from http://www.colourlovers.com/ with maybe some sort of theme, but the thread didn't really take off. There's also seasonal things people do like Inktober and cat month. And I've seen a few 100-theme challenges go by in my time browsing.

    So whichever kind of thing you'd like to do is up to you really. When I started out I did a 100 Cats thing loosely based off of this because I'm a huge cave story nerd. So whatever works for you, really is what is best I think.
    I have been thinking about doing a every dog breed thing. taking a week or so to study each breed and then try drawing them. maybe at the end i'll notice some difference from the first breed i drew to the last one. but yeah, tings liek the 100 cats challenge and such is probably something im looking for.

  5. #5
    Sorry about your illness. Things like that make everything universally more difficult. If you find it unusually difficult to focus/work on one thing for extended periods of time, you might be interested in the Pomodoro Technique. Basically you commit to work on a task for 25 minutes and then stop to take a break. This has its advantages with injury prevention because the recommended time interval to take a break, to stand up and stretch, is every 25 minutes. The other advantage is that if you start feeling like you can't go on working anymore, you'll have a better chance of just pushing through the last 5 or 10 minutes of your Pomodoro instead of despairing because you have 90 minutes on the clock left, or you have no time set with no commitment and just give up.

    If you are just starting out, don't learn to draw using a Wacom tablet. The hand-eye coordination required to use a Wacom tablet is so foreign that it would be better to learn the fundamentals of drawing without that handicap. Don't try to learn both drawing and using a tablet at the same time. Even once you get better at drawing with a tablet it'll still be faster and more accurate for you to start your illustration with paper and pencil first, and then bring it into the computer for coloring. Tablets are great for painting and for coloring, where accuracy (and therefore speed don't matter as much), but for the actual drawing pencil and paper is still superior. (I have a 27" Cintiq and I still prefer to drawing with paper depending on what I'm doing).

    Practice with pencil. Draw big; one figure per page. Draw from life and draw people. Try to get a likeness of the object you are drawing. Drawing simple objects like spheres, boxes, furniture, simple things. I wish you had more resources because I would recommend taking a class, but what they would have you do first is what are called construction drawings, then head drawing, then figure drawings. There's a technique that artists use to check their distances and angles to make sure the proportions of the object they are drawing are correct. Basically you hold your pencil out at arms length, use the tip of the pencil and then move your thumb to measure a distance, and then hold that thumb position to move the pencil around the object/figure you are drawing to check distances to make sure yours match on paper. Kind of hard to explain without showing, but that is the basics of drawing accurately. You have to train your brain to see proportions and angles accurately, because naturally it does not.

    Watch a lot of people draw. See how they start their drawings, how they block in the forms before they add detail. The most important part of a drawing is the start, so learn how to start a drawing well. In figure drawing there's a phase where you have to draw a figure as best you can in about 10 minutes, then you start another drawing. Again, it's training you how to make good starts on drawings.

    Draw with a ballpoint pen as well. It doesn't smear like pencil and you can't erase it. Learning how to make a drawing without resorting to erasing every little mistake is good practice. Ballpoint pens allow you to draw lightly. It's good for shading lightly but also for the initial block-in and construction phase of your drawing. Put it in lightly at first and then just draw on top of it. Having your construction drawing and block-in still visible in a drawing has a cool aesthetic to it, like a blueprint. With character design, I like to have that information still visible in my drawing if I end up drawing something really successful and I want to still have the construction drawing there so I can reverse engineer it. Also, if you use different color inks, it can make it easier to remove your construction drawing later in the computer.

    Okay, so the reason why I asked you what you think about when you have nothing else to think about, which you responded saying, "I tend to create fantasy worlds and imagine myself living in them." That's perfect. The best way to be motivated and to always have ideas to draw is to have a project, preferably a story-driven project. Create a world. Create a story that you absolutely have to tell, and then draw what is in that world.

    Granted you still need to practice drawing things that do exist in real life so you can learn how to draw things that don't, but once your brain has been trained to draw things as you see them, your mind's eye will then be able to do the same thing. For years I had struggled getting a particular character design out of my head. Everything I drew never matched the fuzzy image of this character in my mind's eye. I knew what I drew was wrong, but I couldn't compare it up to something that didn't physically exist. I was worried if what was in my mind's eye wasn't a physical design at all, just some weird abstract representation of that character my mind created, meaning that whatever I drew wouldn't be able to match the delusion that was that particular design. But then I had my breakthrough. One day, after years of struggling trying to get that character's design out on paper, after years of learning caricature, learning how to draw foreheads, jaws, necks, and all kinds of body parts using dozens upon dozens of different shapes (triangles, squares, squircles, and ovals of every proportion and distortion you can thing of) to really push that character design, one day my mind's eye looked at that character and it noticed something. The shape used to create the skull is Rounded Trapazoid #2. His jaw is Triangle #8. His eyebrows go above the skull line. His eyes are half the height of his head. My mind's eye knew all of this because I had become so familiar with these primitive 3D shapes that I used in the construction drawings of wildly pushed character designs. I had become so familiar with those 3D shapes, that the chasm between what was in my head and what I could put down on paper disappeared almost completely. I started to draw. Within about an hour I was staring into the face of that character that had been trapped in my head for so long.

    Draw from life as accurately as possible to train you brain to see angles and proportions. Do construction drawings of simple objects in perspective so you can understand 3D space. Construction drawing will become the foundation of being able to draw the human body from memory from any angle without needing reference, which is a skill that you will use for invention, creating things that don't exist, including wildly appealing and pushed proportions for your character designs, props and environments. Caricature is where you flex your character design muscles, replacing that dull sphere shape for the head with something else like a cone, a wedge, or a teardrop. That is what it took for me to completely break the boundary between my hand and my mind's eye.

  6. #6
    I would say just keep practicing and if you want inspiration look around you, in books, on this site, anywhere that art resides and before you know it pop. And if you are worried about no one liking your stuff, there are always people out there who would love to see your work, just because someone hates your style of art there are always 50 more who loves it. Just keep your head up high

 

 

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