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    Parapraxis' Art Adventure


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  4. #4
    Senior fxscreamer's Avatar
    Weasyl
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  5.   This is the last staff post in this thread.   #5
    Retired Staff Tiger's Avatar
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    You're doing great so far! One book I would recommend is "Drawing the Head and Figure" by Jack Hamm. I think you will find it immensely helpful. Keep up the good work!

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    Senior kynliod's Avatar
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by kynliod View Post
    I need to get back into drawing gestures. They really help keep your figures looking more natural! Your guys look good! I'm drawing (no pun intended!) a blank on what the term is, but that first line that you draw--the quick, sweeping line that follows the action of the body--are you using those and erasing them, or are you strictly doing stick figures? Stick figures are great for memorizing proportions, but loose gestures are super helpful for making your figures fluid and natural looking. Here's a great video on how to take your gestures to that level of capturing motion. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=rmT7gEgwexc

    I usually do the gesture first, then build the stick figure and flesh out the muscles and so forth on top of that. It helps to do gestures using a model. You'll find the more you do it, the more you'll start to recognize the different curves of the body, and it will help when you get to that stage of putting meat on the bones, as you put it. There are tons of artist model photo websites out there that you can use for fuel. I've used this one a fair amount in the past (warning, nudes, and there's are some mildly suggestive photo collections, just FYI--mostly just figures though). http://www.characterdesigns.com/inde...page=photosets

    Glad you're no longer sick, BTW!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Regarding your post (#6), I noticed in your figure where you started fleshing out your figure, he appears to be missing the whole pelvic area (in other words, the torso seems to sprout legs without there being any pelvis region). It would be a good idea to include the pelvis shape in your stick figures, since this will help you maintain the proportions in that area. He really looks pretty good overall, but I think that's the area that is throwing you off there. I like Andrew Loomis' stick figure model for that reason. It includes the area where the hip joint connects, so it helps you visualize when fleshing out that area. Here's a pic of his figures:

    Anyway, hope all that is helpful! You've inspired me, I think I will start doing gestures again. Thanks! =D
    Hey, thanks for taking the time to respond! I really appreciate it. I have to admit that I often forget to use that initial line. I think I've seen it called a mood line before, but there are probably hundreds of different names for it. The ones in my most recent post didn't use it. I need to force myself to use it though, as the times that I have I feel as if things have been much more... natural looking than the times I haven't.

    So far when I do the gestures, I've been using a website that has a bunch of actors in various poses. I'll definitely check out the one you linked, though. More variety is always a good thing. I guess the point I'm stuck on is "putting the meat on the bones". I haven't taken any anatomy classes or anything like that, so my knowledge of the human body when it comes to muscles is somewhat lacking. Would you suggest just learning the muscles before jumping in to trying to actually draw a whole figure from start to finish?

    In regards to my 6th post, yeah he is definitely missing some bits and pieces. That was mostly just a test run of the tablet that I had just received. Of course, my general lack of knowledge about the human skeletal system is also probably a bit of a roadblock there as well, when it comes to having the proper structure to form the body around. I really like the way that the image you linked does the stick figures, though. I'm definitely going to have to try and move myself over into doing it more like that, as it seems as if it would be more beneficial for me to draw them that way in particular.

    Thanks again for the reply, and for the message as well! I'll probably wind up contacting you from time to time with questions, as I'm certain that I'll have PLENTY more as time goes on.

    Edit: Also, I just looked at your galleries here on Weasyl. Holy COW what you've got going on is impressive.

  10. #10
    Senior kynliod's Avatar
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    Thanks so much, that is very kind. =) Definitely feel free to message me any time.

    As far as figure drawing, you do want to read up/study human anatomy, but drawing from life is probably going to be even more beneficial, since it doesn't just show the technical aspect of the body, but shows the body's parts all working together. I'm not sure it matters too much which you start with, as long as you do both. Using references helps for sure. Andrew Loomis art books are fantastic, I learned a lot from those. But not knowing anatomy thoroughly shouldn't stop you from drawing from observation using references. Even use yourself as a reference. If you are drawing legs, for example, look at your own legs, feel around where the muscles are, watch your legs move, etc. I've been known to do that quite a lot, and it can be very helpful because you can see where the curves are, and feel/see how the body moves, how the curves change as you move, that sort of thing. Anyway, definitely learn anatomy, but don't let that take the place of drawing from life or using reference photos and an observational eye. Hope that helps! =)

 

 

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