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  1. #21
    And the best programmers are those who learn how something is made hands-on. Once that's been done and you understand what you're doing, you would gain that knowledge and then attempt to improve on what's been done based on other findings.

  2. #22
    Solifugid Onnes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeenageAngst View Post
    TBH that sounds like something that would be handled better by Excel. That's part of the problem, really. Most things I think of can usually be handled better by statistical software packages or Excel.
    See, saying something would be better handled by Excel is just evidence that you need more experience with programming. (Moving away from Excel also drastically reduces the chance that your collaborators will start poisoning your coffee.) If you can't yet imagine yourself tackling a real project then focus on tutorials. I think I got most of my foundational experience just working through various courses on MIT's OpenCourseWare. You do need some level of background before you can really plan out a larger project -- if you aren't comfortable with what you're doing then you probably won't know where to even begin.

  3. #23
    I actually really like Excel. I've found people who don't like Excel tend to be people who either don't know enough about computers to make it work for them or people who don't hang around with enough people who don't know much about computers to see value in making a user-friendly modifiable auto-fill spreadsheet. My econometrics software for instance ran like greased lightning even under large workloads but trying to collaborate using FORTRAN code was like bashing our heads against a wall, especially since we had an Excel add on that did the same thing just slower.

    I guess that's part of my problem is I don't have an issue I'm actively trying to surmount.
    Get a loada this guy here.
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  4. #24
    Solifugid Onnes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeenageAngst View Post
    I actually really like Excel. I've found people who don't like Excel tend to be people who either don't know enough about computers to make it work for them or people who don't hang around with enough people who don't know much about computers to see value in making a user-friendly modifiable auto-fill spreadsheet. My econometrics software for instance ran like greased lightning even under large workloads but trying to collaborate using FORTRAN code was like bashing our heads against a wall, especially since we had an Excel add on that did the same thing just slower.
    Excel has two major issues. First, it has awful compatibility. It's a complete pain to get an Excel program running properly without having the appropriate Excel version. Not only does this tend to lock out users on OSX or Linux, but it also presents difficulties for Windows users that are either ahead or behind in the Office release cycle. The other issue is with error checking. Excel is a spreadsheet editor. If you're using it for more sophisticated programs then it becomes increasingly difficult to walk through the flow of control and deal with bugs. It's more or less designed to hide the details of its calculations; this is fine for simple, built-in operations but dangerous for more advanced functions.


    I guess that's part of my problem is I don't have an issue I'm actively trying to surmount.
    Then the obvious question is: Why do you want to expand your knowledge of programming? Learning anything is difficult without sufficient motivation.

  5. #25
    For funsies, the same reason I learn anything that isn't mandated.
    Get a loada this guy here.
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