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  Click here to go to the first staff post in this thread.   Thread: art help

  1. #11
    Senior Eagle GodHeart's Avatar
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    sorry about any "ranting" ive done ive not been thinking clearly....... but any way yeah i usually use yahoo since it has better results (you know for sizeing nothin else) but thanks for the tips and ill go check out google.
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  2.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #12
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    For books I recommend Jack Hamm. I use two books of his very frequently: "How to Draw Animals" and "Drawing the Head and Figure". Very good for both beginning and more advanced artists.

    As for anthros specifically, there's the book "Freaks! How to Draw Fantastic Fantasy Creatures" by Steve Miller but I've found it nowhere near as helpful as the Jack Hamm books. Hamm actually teaches you in his books, while Miller essentially just shows a sketch then a finished pic, sometimes not even the sketch. It's got cool pics to look at but as far as learning, you won't get much out of it.

    Posemaniacs.com is a good online reference source as well.

  3. #13
    Senior Eagle GodHeart's Avatar
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    well i was thinking somthing more like http://www.amazon.com/Draw-Furries-A.../dp/1600614175
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  4.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagle GodHeart View Post
    well i was thinking somthing more like http://www.amazon.com/Draw-Furries-A.../dp/1600614175
    That doesn't really teach you much, though, it just shows you a sketch and then a finished product. I cannot recommend the Jack Hamm books enough because they really teach you the foundations of anatomy and proportions and such.

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    Senior Damian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagle GodHeart View Post
    well i was thinking somthing more like http://www.amazon.com/Draw-Furries-A.../dp/1600614175
    For the love of god, do not buy that piece of shit. We sell that at my store and the art in there is just bad.
    We all have our demons. If we're not fighting them, then we've befriended them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Damian View Post
    For the love of god, do not buy that piece of shit. We sell that at my store and the art in there is just bad.
    I saw it in a Hobby Lobby here too. Centradragon's art is on one page though. <3

    @OP: I've heard a lot of good things about Jack Hamm in my time in this fandom, so I will second Tiger's suggestion. Also, you seem like you are super fresh and have to train your eye still. It's a really fun part of the artistic process.

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    Senior Damian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterflygoddess View Post
    I saw it in a Hobby Lobby here too. Centradragon's art is on one page though. <3

    @OP: I've heard a lot of good things about Jack Hamm in my time in this fandom, so I will second Tiger's suggestion. Also, you seem like you are super fresh and have to train your eye still. It's a really fun part of the artistic process.
    There are some books that are alright. One that helped me was a combination of sketchbook and art book. I wish i knew what it was called. It was mainly fantasy creatures and it was gifted to me so i can't look it up again.

    Dammit i gotta find it because it was really nice.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagle GodHeart View Post
    well i was thinking somthing more like http://www.amazon.com/Draw-Furries-A.../dp/1600614175
    Quote Originally Posted by Damian View Post
    For the love of god, do not buy that piece of shit. We sell that at my store and the art in there is just bad.
    I agree with Damian. The art's kind of... Egh. Even the cover art is a bit creepy.
    They have a second book with better art, but I dunno if it's good for learning either.

    Personally, I don't like most "How to Draw" books. They take you through the steps of how to draw specific things, but I'm not sure it's that helpful for drawing your own, different ideas. (Not sure I worded that right, hope I'm making sense here.) But that's just my opinion, I suppose.

    My advice would be to learn human anatomy first, then some animal anatomy, and combine the two. I find it more helpful than trying to learn to draw anthro characters straight off the bat. But of course, everyone learns differently.

    I would strongly recommend learning to draw basic construction shapes first, dimensional shapes like spheres, cubes, cylinders and such. I think most art classes seem to start with teaching those, then they move on to using those shapes to construct more complicated forms. Basic construction is really important for making a drawing look dimensional, instead of flat.

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    To be honest, nobody can really help you with improving art but yourself. There are no tips or tricks or tutorials that show you how to properly draw a body. Except if you count anatomy tutorials in. There may be tutorials on techniques and different drawing programs but we're talking about basic observing and anatomy here.
    Before I started studying illustration, I would think that once I started in university, everything will just be taught and I'll improve eventually. Well that was wrong. My professors don't actually teach 'drawing' or 'painting' but rather make me draw and paint alot and inspire me to try out new things to enrich my art and style.

    So in order to get an anthro drawing right, I'll completely agree with Damian. What you need is just alot of practice and good references of both humans and animals. I'd always recommend live drawing or nude drawing but if you don't have the possibility to do that, there are many stock images on the net that you can use to study anatomy.
    Also, I would not recommend any books that are suppose to teach you how to draw. Drawing is more about observing than moving the pencil on paper. There is no trick in learning how to draw, just learn to oberserve things and see them as how they really are.
    Books on anatomy however are great

    Hope it was somewhat helpful and good luck on your art!
    Last edited by Singarl; 05-09-2015 at 08:57 AM.

  10. #20
    I generally ask what someone's long-term artist goals are before I spurt out my recommendations, and I do still ask that you let us know what your long term goals are so we can provide better information for you, but I'm going to post my default response anyway as it's pretty universal advice.

    Seriously though, still let us know what your long-term and short-term artistic goals are (long term being the most important).

    I know what it's like to learn. Back then I always wanted to draw just this one thing and learn how to do it as quickly as possible. Starting out you won't be able to find a tutorial that addresses today's problem. You need structured learning to truly be happy and have fun creating art. It's why I'm a happier and better artist than I am a composer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Singarl View Post
    To be honest, nobody can really help you with improving art but yourself.
    No, they can. It's called art classes. Sure, individual hard work is the price of entry, but I can proudly say that I am most certainty not a self-taught artist. Even post-college when I was struggling with character design for animation, I couldn't figure it out on my own. I knew there was something that character designers like Stephen Silver, David Coleman, Nicolas Marlet and Tom Bancroft knew about character design that I did not. I'm a decently smart and analytical guy, and after a year I couldn't crack that code on my own. So I took a character design class and then bam, someone cracked it for me in two weeks.

    I'll second the recommendation that you need to get your construction drawing down and being able to draw basic 3D shapes accurately. If at all possible, take a Drawing 1 class (I think most community colleges have it, at least here in California), or get a good book on basic drawing. Learn how to draw spheres, learn how to draw cubes in perspective. Draw architecture. Draw a mechanical object as a CAD-style construction drawing in 3D perspective. Those skills will not only inform you in drawing accurately, but it'll train your brain to think in 3D which will help you draw characters and body parts from any angle.

    Then of course do figure drawings so you can further train your brain to see angle and proportion so you can draw what you see, and to start passively learning anatomy. Once you can draw what you see, then start learning anatomy in detail from the inside out (bones, muscles, etc.) so that you can draw the human body from memory without reference. That's when you'll be utilizing your construction-style drawing skills from Drawing 1. You'll be breaking the body down into simple 3D shapes and drawing on top of it. The skull of the head becomes a sphere, and if you can't draw a sphere with properly placed center lines you won't be able to draw facial features in the right place.

    I understand location and income are huge factors in how you learn, but I'd still recommend learning in this order even if you are learning through books or online resources: analytical construction drawing of mechanical (or at least geometrically simple) objects, figure drawing, anatomy study (muscles, bones, etc.) then simplified construction drawings for humans. Then study animals using those same techniques.

    I also strongly recommend against using "How to Draw Furry" resources because you will get stuck in that one style. You need to start with basics, get your skills up, and then you can start the process of invention and find your own voice once you can hit all the notes. If you are learning for short-term fun, I can say that invention is a lot more fun than copying someone else.

    As for creating anthropomorphic animal characters in the furry style, it's largely putting an animal head on a human-like body and blending human and animal elements together. So your path for learning that has been pretty much laid out earlier in this thread. If you're interested in creating non-furry anthropomorphic animal characters or any type of character design for animation, that's a whole other school of design theory: appeal, shape language, graphic iconography (useful for rotating your initial character design and have it look like the same character), dominant/subordinate shape, triangulation, etc. That's a discussion for a different forum. So Eagle GodHeart, if that's a direction you're interested in, just PM me.

 

 

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