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  1. #11
    I personally like Liberation Serif for writing.

  2. #12
    Junior SpiritMachine's Avatar
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    I like tekton pro bold

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    so whats the difference between liberation sarif and times new roman

  3. #13
    Premium User Oly's Avatar
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    I historically hand letter because I'm that difficult kind of person, and most of my comics are dumb and scribbly and drawn as fast as I can anyway, so perfect neat lettering would look stupid on them.

  4. #14
    feline fine Noxid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpiritMachine View Post
    I like tekton pro bold

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    so whats the difference between liberation sarif and times new roman
    Liberation Serif is the free alternative to Times New Roman

  5. #15
    Senior Umbra_Exe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oly View Post
    I historically hand letter because I'm that difficult kind of person, and most of my comics are dumb and scribbly and drawn as fast as I can anyway, so perfect neat lettering would look stupid on them.
    I tend to hand-letter my comic text as well, for basically the same reason. I think I may have used the Anime Ace font on something a while back, though.

  6. #16
    Junior batbot's Avatar
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    blambot has a large number of free-to-use/free-for-indies and commercial release fonts.
    The two biggest things I'd suggest: use a font that has some warmth, unless you are making a characterization with it (like, a robot using a very straight, monotype or event pixelly-font), it needs to not distract from the pictures by having too much flourish, AND by not being too "computer-y". Second, be wary of "title fonts", like "wedding fonts" they have some extra flourish, design, heaviness, that make them great for titles or even sfx, but are too conspicuous for every panel.
    Try maybe practising writing very neatly, and choose a font that has some similar letterforms (like, how you write your y's and a's and g's, for example) to your own handwriting. (Synthesis!) (I'm also a hardass who hand letters all my comics, even if I change it to type after. I only just started using microns for it, too. I was rlly resistant to using anything but a round-point dip pen for years--and hahah i persist even tho I'm not that skilled with lettering.)

    @Eduard's suggestion: Typically, you should almost never use a serif font (like TNR) in a comic as speech. It can sometimes work for a narration box or a "text-to-image" transfer (i.e. the opening of Robin Hood or Winnie the Pooh Disney movies, with the text from the book setting up the framework for the visual narrative) or "words-by-image" illustration.
    The reasoning is probably two-fold and hinges a lot on "tradition"; but the common wisdom is that the serifs make the text look cramped, and can cause glyph confusion, particularly in print or anywhere size reduction of the total image may happen (only proper-noun "I" as in "I went to the movies" gets serifs, so it doesn't look like an "l"). The other reason, is likely with digital work, serif type faces look like the "default text editor" option; not an aesthetic choice.
    Of course YMMV depending on the nature of the art. Also it's somewhat ironic that the reasons sans-serif is used in comics are the same reasons serif is used in books: print legibility.

    Impact is also def a headline/title font and I probably wouldn't suggest using it for longer bits of text.

    (but Ariel could probably work well enough, it kinda feels "default" and lacks warmth, but it's not that bad iafa legibility!)

    @rbartrop's comment: Filthy lies! (kidding), but really, Comic Sans is based off comic lettering, hmmm the names of the letterists escape me (or even if there were specific letterists over just artists) but I'm pretty sure I was told it was a mashup of the lettering in Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns; which is why it's such a godawful font for actually lettering comics in, the type founder was copying letterforms from two different hand-lettered works, and trying to string them together, to which I've heard the observation that this is why the kerning in Comic Sans is pretty bad. The font designer may have aspired to have it used for comics, and it may have been adopted here and there, but generally it's regarded as Really Bad For Lettering in the comics world (and comics people are way more hostile to it than, say, graphic designers/typesetters because it's got "comic" right in the name.)

    *has such! opinions! about lettering*
    apathetic.

  7. #17
    Regular SailorX2's Avatar
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    From my experience, especially since I've done some graphic design in the past as well as being an avid comic reader the biggest influence is your art. I mean if I have a nice victorian-esque looking style with details that make it look like an old engraving or fairy tale illustration I'm not gonna use something that looks modern or like it belongs in a sci-fi universe, even if it worked amazingly well in a comic about aliens. A 1920's font will look well if you have an art deco like style. Many people who go for the manga look often use the same typeface because it works with that animesque art style (but it clashes with alot of my work). The Twilight comics (yes, they exist), use Times New Roman and it looks AWFUL, but there was a cute little webcomic I found that was able to use it for all of the dialogue and I couldn't imagine it any other way. If all else fails, pull up a ready-to-go page that's finished with all but the words and go through different styles until you get something that clicks.

    The most important parts are readability, and if it matches the work itself.
    "And that ability to suffer fools, to tolerate annoyance, that's literally the one single thing that allows you to function in a world populated by other people who aren't you. Otherwise, you turn emo. Science has proven it."
    -Cracked.com

 

 

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