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  1. #21
    Junior Avaelon125's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XoPachi View Post
    ^Absolutely right, honestly. I've seen a lot of friends who write especially grieve about that last part.
    So I'm basically boned, right? Whopee-deedle-fuckin-doo-da

  2. #22
    Senior Manna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avaelon125 View Post
    So I'm basically boned, right? Whopee-deedle-fuckin-doo-da
    eh, not really

    Artists need the public exposure that sites like Weasyl provide much more than Writers do.

    When you're an "online artist" your main source of income is from commissions, which are dependent on how many people have seen and liked your work: your view count and your favourites etc

    For writers that sort of thing doesn't really matter. No one is going to commission you for a piece of writing. What you want to do is get hooked up with a publisher, which is more dependent on your talent as a writer than on how popular you are.

    If you want to be a "popular writer", or make money of your writing, you should be more focused on getting a publishing deal than racking up your viewcount

  3. #23
    Regular KajTaotsu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manna View Post
    For writers that sort of thing doesn't really matter. No one is going to commission you for a piece of writing. What you want to do is get hooked up with a publisher, which is more dependent on your talent as a writer than on how popular you are.
    I follow a few writers, and while not all of em are on weasyl, they do offer writing commissions and people do take up the offer. Sometimes written work is even better than visual, so paying someone to write this grand story you have in your mind, but are incapable for one reason or another to do it yourself, isn't a bad idea.

    That being said, Im not saying dont look towards a publisher of sort. If you feel your work is good enough, I say go for it.
    Hell, if a horribly written twilight fanfiction rehash can do it, I dont see why anyone else couldnt!
    Even after the darkest nights, morning always comes.

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  4.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #24
    Retired Staff Frank LeRenard's Avatar
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    Don't write to get views, because you'll only get discouraged. I think people in general just don't read as much as they used to, anyway, so you can't hope for much when posting to a site where your piece is only visible on the front page for a few hours at best. It can be frustrating not to ever get any feedback when you're trying to get better, but that's what things like writing circles or critique circles are for. Maybe look online and see if you can find one that's local to you, or else start one yourself. That also has the benefit that eventually your group will become familiar with each others' work and will thus be able to give more specific critique. You get better critiques from people who know what you're trying to accomplish, because then they can advise you on how to accomplish it better, rather than just giving standard typo-checking or whatever.

  5. #25
    Senior Gnarl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank LeRenard View Post
    Don't write to get views, because you'll only get discouraged. I think people in general just don't read as much as they used to, anyway, so you can't hope for much when posting to a site where your piece is only visible on the front page for a few hours at best. It can be frustrating not to ever get any feedback when you're trying to get better, but that's what things like writing circles or critique circles are for. Maybe look online and see if you can find one that's local to you, or else start one yourself. That also has the benefit that eventually your group will become familiar with each others' work and will thus be able to give more specific critique. You get better critiques from people who know what you're trying to accomplish, because then they can advise you on how to accomplish it better, rather than just giving standard typo-checking or whatever.
    Starting or getting into a local group of writers in IRL is not so easy as you make it sound. I made friends with a couple of local writer and very quickly found that their entire group was dedicated to patting each other on the back and congratulating themselves for being writers.
    then I read some of their work.... makes my junk...uh... stories look like literary masterpieces! they thought that they were doing great to have a 40K novella. I never bothered to tell them that my first work, even with all its errors, was over 181K. I guess you have better luck than I. I tried to talk to the English prof. from the local college and she just gave the cold shoulder not even bothering to ask questions.
    they have a real attitude like they are gods or something just because they have a job as a professor. wonder what they do if they found out that I have not one but two degrees of a higher level than they do.... "shakes head and walks away chuckling!" Now I wish I had studied English instead of art, well, not really...

  6.   This is the last staff post in this thread.   #26
    Retired Staff Frank LeRenard's Avatar
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    I guess you do sort of have to be in the right place, or at least get lucky and find the right group. There are groups online, of course, or you can build themselves yourself through various functions on sites like CritiqueCircle.com. I guess the point is to try to find a group that works well for you and then stick with them. Or you can do what I did and just read a lot. Both books about writing as a craft, and other peoples' fiction (the latter perhaps more important than the former, though the former I did find extremely helpful back when I first started getting mildly serious about this).

  7. #27
    Honestly, I've found more people responded to reading on dedicated communities to reading.

    Posting stories on art sites (all of them) seems to have been more or less put in as an afterthought. It's often sorta just... put on.

  8. #28
    Junior Chiffon's Avatar
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    I've seen what you're talking about on SoFurry, and it is kind of frustrating as far as older pieces go. The only way someone will find them is through several pages of searching or someone else's favorites. I think there's a random slot on the main stories page, which is a kind effort, but they're still going to be overwhelmed by the flood of daily submissions.

    The bar is also lower for adult submissions, because who really cares when you just want to wank a bit? Keep in mind, a lot of respected titles didn't have an audience (or publishers) falling to their knees in awe when they were first shown, either. People aren't always accurate judges, and 50 Shades is a bestseller.

    Speaking from the position of a reader...

    When I was younger some of my favorite pieces of fiction were in online archives, and they were all clean (or clean except for a surprise sex scene in chapter 42!). I'm still open-minded to reading such things over something plucked off the shelf when I want to sit down with a story, but there are a few problems.

    1) A large number of writers simply don't revise and edit enough, whether it's clean or adult. This may mean a piece is confusing to read, or just that there's several paragraphs describing inane things like someone brushing their teeth and combing their hair.

    2) Despite being well-written, the piece doesn't have much of a point. It may not be leading up to something, trying to give a perspective, etc.

    3) Nobody uses the description space to write a summary and give me a reason to pay attention to them for half an hour.

    There are a lot of things that can potentially be a weak point, but those are the big ones that turn me off from reading online instead of buying a book. I think it's worsened by the fact that so many people want to write a novel or a series (bigger is always better, right?), so despite any shortcomings they're asking for a large time investment.

    I tend not to offer critiques unless they're requested, in part because I don't want to step on toes and in part because I come to read. I believe people improve first and foremost through reading, writing, and learning about writing, not through being instructed on what to change in their work in order to be "good". J.K. Rowling didn't need feedback from strangers on the Internet as far as I know, nor did she need a certain amount of favorites and follows every chapter in order to motivate her to complete Harry Potter.

    Unless your writing is putting food on the table, I think those who worry about peer pressure may be writing for the wrong reasons. It's hard to have your own unique take or a direction to grow in when you're afraid to lose people who don't like what you have to say, anyway. I'm pretty sure that Stephen King just wants to be offensive and stupid sometimes, and at least that's interesting. The offended will go elsewhere, and people like me who think it's hilarious will pay even more attention to him.
    Last edited by Chiffon; 09-24-2014 at 01:48 PM.

  9. #29
    Senior Gnarl's Avatar
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    I agree, that is what I have said before. I write for me and hope others will enjoy it. I try to improve with each work and since I do not do it for a living I am not restricted to some outside controlling group. I am glad that people are still reading my stories and upset that they are getting pirated but at least no one has told me to stop, not that I would if they did. I do it for the story!
    Though I do need to improve on painting the picture instead of just telling the story. Thanks Manna, for that bit of advice it has helped.
    As far as writing a novel, well, been there done that, a couple of times. I don't think that the length is the biggest issue.

  10. #30
    I prefer SoFurry over Weasyl, or any other furry-oriented or affiliated site. Never been to FurAffinity, and don't ever plan to, and the same for InkBunny and some of the others I've heard the names of over the years. My lacking profiles on the forums and main site here can attest to how little I use this site as anything other than a data backup (no, don't bother looking, it's literally that sparse); hell, it makes me a little uncomfortable when people on Weasyl decide to watch me. Granted, a large percentage of this has to do with why I even came here, but these feelings are within me and I've yet to fully overcome them.

    I like writing and reading erotic materials, but it isn't all I'm after. I wrote a story that is mature, but it has no sexual content. One person on Weasyl favorited it, nobody else on either site. Not because it was bad, far from it. A lot of people prefer reading sexy stuff, but that's not all I'm after. I want to write a number of stories that have zero sex in them, and I would like for people to tell me how much they like the story (comment, favorite, vote, whatever), but it isn't needed. I'm going to write clean stories that don't have a single bad word or act in them, and I know that someone, somewhere, at some point in time will eventually say or do something positive about it because it is a good story regardless of how little sex it has.

    I write stories predominantly because I like writing stories. If you like it, okay. If not, I don't care. It's sad that many would rather have a sexual story than a nonsexual one, but that's on them; plenty of people will love you for writing a good story regardless of how many ejaculations you put into it.

    My two cents.
    Sega does what Nintendon't.

 

 

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