Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
  1. #11
    Premium User Oly's Avatar
    Weasyl
    oly
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    edmonton
    Gender
    NB/male leaning
    Posts
    307
    Heh... those latex masks are almost TOO realistic honestly. And again, they're smooth, not furry... i wanna fuzz face :U
    Thanks for the suggestions regardless.
    I am likely going to just go with foam and try to get it to deform with my brow as much as i can. And maybe cheeks if i can swing it. I'm not expecting a lot, just enough that if i smile big/puff my cheeks up or raise my brow a lot, it'll show through at least a bit.

    Honestly, i'm actually pretty confident in my ability to get it mostly right my first go... and i also have my friends who make their own suits who can give me a hand if I need it. So i'm not worried about the cost being that high. And really buying this sort of thing from someone else just doesn't seem right to me. for myself I mean, I don't have a problem with other people buying fursuits from others as that would jsut be silly of me, just for me it doesn't really feel like an option.

    And Flame... 50 bucks is still a LOT for me right now... that's a weeks worth of food I wouldn't be eating xP I feel bad about the meager budget I have for this as it is. I will definitely keep that book in mind for the future though, maybe suggest it to my friends and if they get it I can just read their copy when i need to. x3

    Thanks again to everyone for your input.

  2.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #12
    Didn't try, Succeeded Fay V's Avatar



    Weasyl
    Fayv
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,379
    I don't think you are taking articulation points into account.

    The reason your face moves the way it does is the muscle points connecting beneath the skin, in order to make something move, you need an articulation point connected to the skin and thus, the muscle. When you look at latex masks, the parts with the most movement are literally attached to the face. With fursuit masks, the most common movement is moving jaw, which is literally attached to a jaw.

    In order to get moving cheeks and brows you need to either A. find a way to attach it to the face, something that probably will not be that effective with foam because it doesn't move and collapse like skin does. B. use animitronics. Something difficult and expensive. you would create your own artificial articulation points with the brows and cheeks, the lines and such inside the mask making the outside move, rather than your own face doing the work.

  3. #13
    Premium User Oly's Avatar
    Weasyl
    oly
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    edmonton
    Gender
    NB/male leaning
    Posts
    307
    I was thinking if the foam is snugly against my face enough/at the right places, it would move - at least a bit - along with the skin underneath.

    But then again I'm not actually sure what the consistency of the foam would be, so i'm kind of working off assumption. I haven't really touched or fiddled with it yet. So if it's too open-structured and soft I guess it would just absorb the movement internally and not show through on the surface, and if it's too dense and stiff i imagine it'd be uncomfortable to wear for very long.

    come to think of it, i have looked at some foam online but don't really remember what kind most suit makers actually use.

    Worth taking into account that i plan on using the least amount of foam possible, enough to make a muzzle and ears, and maybe just thin bits where needed to adjust the shape. As i said in the OP, very minimal, only what is absolutely necessary to get it to work. And the areas I'm planning to make articulate, I'm planning on using the thinnest amount of foam as possible. My thinking is that the less foam is there the easier deformation will show through it...

    I should really try and make some designs I guess, it would probably be helpful to visualize exactly what i have in mind. Have to try and remember to work something up at home tonight.

    Essentially I have in mind the muzzle piece mainly fitting over my cheeks and bridge of the nose, the sides going only out about equal to the corners of my eyes and running down my face down to about the corners of my mouth. and the jaw piece working as an extension of my jaw/chin as closely as possible. May or may not need some padding on the brow depending if it looks right without it or not. My idea was to try and contour everything to flow as naturally as i can off my own face.

    bleh this is probably far less effective than a drawing would be. i will sketch something up.

  4.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #14
    Didn't try, Succeeded Fay V's Avatar



    Weasyl
    Fayv
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,379
    Unless you are physically attaching it to your face then it won't get a lot of movement, the cheek simply brushes over it. I've had foam heads before that were fit to my face, I built it around my own face, you simply don't get the movement because there isn't an articulation point. If you found a way to basically glue the cloth or foam to your face each time you may get somewhere.

  5. #15
    Premium User Oly's Avatar
    Weasyl
    oly
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    edmonton
    Gender
    NB/male leaning
    Posts
    307
    Hmmmm... Perhaps a leather/similar material lining would do the trick? something naturally kind of tacky that would grip the skin. Shouldn't be too extreme of a tradeoff on comfort, I think.

  6.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #16
    Didn't try, Succeeded Fay V's Avatar



    Weasyl
    Fayv
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,379
    I'm not sure that would do it, and you have to consider the oils in your skin, it will degrade the material. Frankly leather in a fursuit head sounds horrific.

  7. #17
    Premium User Oly's Avatar
    Weasyl
    oly
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    edmonton
    Gender
    NB/male leaning
    Posts
    307
    I do sweat a lot too, so it would be very likely to degrade the material... but then that's gonna happen to the head itself too regardless.
    I was thinking about that too, if the moisture/oilyness of my skin isn't right it might be completely ineffective.
    also i was just meaning pads, like say on teh cheeks and brow, not a lining on the entire interior. In case that wasn't clear. The whole thing being lined would be awful. :U

    Any other ideas how it might be done? Only other thing i can think of is maybe trying to use spirit gum but that sounds highly ineffective, probably messy and finicky to get on/off. Maybe double sided tape... would probably not be super comfortable but might be better than spirit gum...?

    Ultimately if i can't do much I might just go ahead a make it anyway. What the hell, why not. Using my own eyes will already kill a lot of the toony-ness and add at least some expression so that's fine.


    Somewhat related to the first line of this post... Like i said, i sweat a lot, and i'm worried it might be too damn much for wearing a suit for very long. Like, even freshly showered and wearing plenty sports strength deodorant, i still get complaints about smell from having to walk 20 minutes to get to work. Maybe spraying the thing with febreeze/equivalent deodorizer before wearing in addition to after might help? Or would that just be a waste of deodorizer? Not a huge issue now since I'm not going to be making a full suit to begin with anyways, just the head and a tail and maybe some fuzzy gloves.

  8.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #18
    Didn't try, Succeeded Fay V's Avatar



    Weasyl
    Fayv
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,379
    In terms of sweat and degrading material/smell. Underarmor. heat wicking gear is your best friend and you should wear a balaclava under a foam head anyway, to keep the foam from degrading. With underarmor the stuff will wick sweat away from skin, basically it keeps you cooler and it keeps you from smelling like a barge. when you're done suiting you can toss it in the wash, instead of having the sweat and oil soak into the suit.

  9. #19
    Premium User Oly's Avatar
    Weasyl
    oly
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    edmonton
    Gender
    NB/male leaning
    Posts
    307
    Ohhh yeah i remember reading that before, totally forgot! Thanks. x3

    I was going to build the head onto a balaclava anyways i think, should i wear a separate one under as well then? I'm guessing it'd be easier to keep clean that way.

    Anyways my work day is over so i shan't have access to the internet until tomorrow. Thanks for the help

  10. #20
    Premium User Flame Soulis's Avatar
    Weasyl
    Flame Soulis
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Fay V View Post
    In terms of sweat and degrading material/smell. Underarmor. heat wicking gear is your best friend and you should wear a balaclava under a foam head anyway, to keep the foam from degrading. With underarmor the stuff will wick sweat away from skin, basically it keeps you cooler and it keeps you from smelling like a barge. when you're done suiting you can toss it in the wash, instead of having the sweat and oil soak into the suit.
    In regards to that, it'd be best to have two. I went to a con with one and while I did hand wash the underarmor, it lost its effectiveness towards the WAY end of the convention. Having two, which I now have, means once you feel one is spent without an actual wash, just swap over to the next.The difference between having the Underarmor and not having it is light and day.

    Also, for animatronics, I do have a kit I've been working on, but currently it's for eye blinking. To give a basic hint regarding how it works, look into Arduinos, which are cheap but powerful developmental boards that work pretty well for a lot of things, including animatronics. It'd also require you know how to make basic programs in C and have some small electrical knowledge (I, myself, am not an electronics major and I can still work with it), and it'd set you back about $25-30 for an Uno and some servos (almost any kind of servo will do), but the end result can work pretty well. It's just something I figured I should throw out there with the mentioning of animatronics.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •