Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 56
  1. #1
    ~Kupo~ Moogle's Avatar
    Weasyl
    N/A
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Canada Ontario
    Gender
    Posts
    1,142

    Art College - is it really worth it?

    I guess I should explain where I'm coming from, and the bump in the road I'm currently at now (which may be more of a blessing rather than a bump!).

    I've always heard that having a good portfolio is key for artists in the field, more so than just a diploma since it's the work you show that will get you the job. I really believe that to be true, and I also feel attending college isn't so much for the diploma as it is for the experience and knowledge you'd be able to learn there. There's books I can get and tutorials online that can help, but many people have told me that for what I may learn in a months time (alone) could easily be taught and absorbed in a week (in college). Originally I was suppose to attend school in January, however due to failing a "Student Mature Test" by a point or two - well, obviously I didn't make it in. I'm beginning to think that this was fate, to let me think on my decision longer and practice my skills a bit more (that, or my english isn't up to their standards..).

    This is where money plays its role. I'm covered for a full year course, but if I were to go a second year after I would have to save quite a bit of cash to attend. Whereas if I were to go solo and do a online type course (I'll post a video below to sorta explain why I may go this route) it apparently wouldn't cost as much, but the money that covers me for college wouldn't (or at least I don't think it would) cover the online expense.

    So basically what I'm asking is is it worth the time and money (which is covered to a certain extent) to attend my local college, or should I continue working on my own towards my goal &/or even sign up for a online art class? This video is what actually got me really thinking, I don't know if I'm just being gullible or not, but I'm easily influenced.

    I'm kinda new to all this college & money coverage stuff.. I don't think I was ever properly prepped for it, so sorry if this is all hard to understand! It's even got my mind jumbled, I'm just really unsure of my next course of action and what to do.

  2. #2
    I think the single greatest good reason to go to college for art is because you'll get to see and learn lots of different approaches to things, and get lots of different feedback as well. I don't think art college is a required thing to be an artist, but it can be a handy way to expand your horizons.

    That said, I think whether art college is worth it really depends on the person, and the college. Every college has its own culture, so it may be worth it to go to art college, but only if you go to one who's student body and faculty have a culture that meshes well with you, otherwise it could end up being a really huge waste of time.

    Also, if you don't think you can afford to do more than 2 semesters, you may want to just hold off on it.

    Most of your first couple of semesters in college is doing core classes, you know math/science/english/history/humanities, most of which will be review of what you did in highschool. I don't know if colleges up in Canada are the same as down here in America, but the only art classes you would be taking in your first year are likely something like these.

    Drawing I and II
    Design I (2D design) and II (3D design)
    Intro Art History I and II
    Art Appreciation (basically art history I again).
    Fish heads! Fish heads! Rolly polly fish heads! Fish heads! Fish heads! Eat them up! Yum!

  3. #3
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


    Weasyl
    QTMelon
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    1,478
    I think Noah Bradley's posts cover most of my thoughts.

    There is a lot more access to information to draw. It is up to the individual to stop making excuses in place of learning and whether or not going to school will have an impact.

    http://www.noahbradley.com/blog/2011...to-art-school/

    https://medium.com/i-m-h-o/138c5efd45e9

  4. #4
    Senior Bri Mercedes's Avatar
    Weasyl
    Bri Mercedes
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Gender
    Posts
    149
    For me, art college was a period of growing up and exploring the industry to figure out what I wanted to do with my life. It ended up being children's illustration, I wouldn't have thought I'd ever get into that! It was great, but now I'm paying $400+ monthly to cover my $30k loans (and still working my ol' part-time job as I pray for art jobs). There's not really a yes or no answer to this.

    What field of art would you like to get into, and how much pressure is there from your family to attend a traditional college?

  5. #5
    Senior Antumbra's Avatar
    Weasyl
    Antumbra
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Colorado
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    678
    I can't really say for art college specifically, since I went to college for graphic design, but I did take some art courses there.

    One thing I really enjoyed was the critique you get. We would hang our art in front of the class so the teacher and classmates could all critique together. I also got some nice connections that led to my first internship.

    That said, I wouldn't do it if it isn't financially feasible. I went into a lot of debt to go to college and I don't suggest it.

  6. #6
    Senior Damian's Avatar
    Weasyl
    N/A
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    amongst the clouds
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    1,261
    It was mentioned in QT's link but I also wanted to point out that (in my opinion of course), going to an art school would be beneficial because of networking and it's easier to get feedback/critique. Here again this is coming from someone who learns better/faster with one on one interaction and is ridiculously shy about showing work otherwise to random people.

    Also it can't hurt your resume if you went to a good art school. If you're not financially able, then don't sweat it. You can still learn. It may take more time depending on your learning abilities but you'll get there.
    We all have our demons. If we're not fighting them, then we've befriended them.

  7. #7
    ~Kupo~ Moogle's Avatar
    Weasyl
    N/A
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Canada Ontario
    Gender
    Posts
    1,142
    Oh woah, thanks for the quick responses guys! Anxiety's already winding down, thank you all kindly!

    Quote Originally Posted by lorenith View Post
    I think the single greatest good reason to go to college for art is because you'll get to see and learn lots of different approaches to things, and get lots of different feedback as well. I don't think art college is a required thing to be an artist, but it can be a handy way to expand your horizons.

    That said, I think whether art college is worth it really depends on the person, and the college. Every college has its own culture, so it may be worth it to go to art college, but only if you go to one who's student body and faculty have a culture that meshes well with you, otherwise it could end up being a really huge waste of time.

    Also, if you don't think you can afford to do more than 2 semesters, you may want to just hold off on it.

    Most of your first couple of semesters in college is doing core classes, you know math/science/english/history/humanities, most of which will be review of what you did in highschool. I don't know if colleges up in Canada are the same as down here in America, but the only art classes you would be taking in your first year are likely something like these.

    Drawing I and II
    Design I (2D design) and II (3D design)
    Intro Art History I and II
    Art Appreciation (basically art history I again).
    Yes, that's a huge reason why I want to go. xD Feedback and critique is a huge bonus to get and I really enjoy receiving it, and it'd be great for a teacher or even a professional to give me some insight. There is one thing I agree with the video I posted though (however, I guess I can't fully agree cause I've never been in college before) but I worry they'll teach me too much random stuff that I will never use. I'm more into 2d - mainly animation. So something like 3d (while handy to know the basics of) wouldn't be something I need to focus on for the line of work I'm aiming for.

    I took a tour at the school and it seemed neat. I liked the art studio in it, and a lot of the artwork that was hanging on the walls were wicked! Ah, there's going to be math & all those? Dang, I literally had the hardest time in any course (with the exception of english) but math was complete hell for me. The course I would be taking is called Art Fundamentals, and this is the overview they have listed for it:


    • Life drawing
    • Painting
    • Sculpture
    • Two-dimensional design
    • Technical drawing


    It's right up my ally, but I took a look at the second year one and it seems to veer off from my interests. I'm wondering if it'd be best to take the first year course and then after continue on my own?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bri Mercedes View Post
    For me, art college was a period of growing up and exploring the industry to figure out what I wanted to do with my life. It ended up being children's illustration, I wouldn't have thought I'd ever get into that! It was great, but now I'm paying $400+ monthly to cover my $30k loans (and still working my ol' part-time job as I pray for art jobs). There's not really a yes or no answer to this.

    What field of art would you like to get into, and how much pressure is there from your family to attend a traditional college?
    I have a good idea of what I want to do, but I think growing up is something I definitely need to work on! XD I need to interact with people more (though it's really difficult for me, but this would more or less force me to do it) and I'm really interested in what they would teach, although I'd hope it'd be in the field I'm going for and not something entirely random. And holy! Debt is something I want to avoid if possible heh sheesh that's a lot of money, I hope you don't have too much trouble paying it off!

    I'd like to get into 2d animation! Something as simple as movement fascinates me, but I find learning it is kinda hard on my own if there's no teacher figure pushing me forward. There's actually not any pressure luckily from my family. My mom originally wanted me to go into vet care or something like working with dogs but art is what I really want to do, even if she may not fully agree.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aleu View Post
    It was mentioned in QT's link but I also wanted to point out that (in my opinion of course), going to an art school would be beneficial because of networking and it's easier to get feedback/critique. Here again this is coming from someone who learns better/faster with one on one interaction and is ridiculously shy about showing work otherwise to random people.

    Also it can't hurt your resume if you went to a good art school. If you're not financially able, then don't sweat it. You can still learn. It may take more time depending on your learning abilities but you'll get there.
    I'm gonna check out those links after! xD (Thx btw QT for them! ) I think 1 on 1 would be great for me to have, I'm shy as well (not so much with my art, but in front of a class so if there's a problem I have, I won't ask or put up my hand cause of everyone around). I'm not sure how good of a college this is (it's called Sheridan) but yes, I think having the option to put it on my resume may give me a bit of a boost for someone to at least call me in for an interview.

  8. #8
    NO, no no no no no. A thousand times no.

    Art school is beneficial if:
    You become the favorite of the staff.
    You already have a high level of skill.
    You don't want to be different.
    You do as the teacher says.
    You don't mind not thinking for yourself or not questioning what is taught.
    You are ready to take every word the teachers say as pure gold, even if it contradicts real world experiences people have told you about.

    EDIT because people think this is about every art school ever: No, it's not. There are some great schools out there, and there are plenty of shitty ones. However, this is something to keep in mind, because this DOES exist. And as I mention later down below (for those that don't mind reading a lot of text), it's best to talk to other STUDENTS, not faculty or staff, to get the best idea of what kind of school you're looking at. And as a little snippet of random info: I met Pendelton(Sp?) Ward, as my at-the-time teacher was friends with him (she knows everyone in this industry, and my school wanted to get rid of her, sadly she is no longer teaching there). He went to CalArts. CalArts didn't like him, or his work, and they didn't expect him to pass. And voila, he made it on his own. He's an awesome chill person who made it because he was determined, not because of his college.

    The colleges are good for networking (if you become friends with the right people) and the diploma. Art colleges are expensive, with most being total busts. The teachers usually haven't been in the professional field for years on end, and it's rare that some are actually working in the field while being a teacher (and they wind up being part time teachers).

    In my experience, all my teachers stopped working in their field for my major(except for three: After Effects Teacher, Sound Design, and a live action film teacher, who did mostly editorial stuff). Their knowledge was outdated. They were talking about one of the early versions of Maya (3D program) and saying how horrible it was without attempting to try a newer version. They linked me tutorials instead of teaching me, and when they did teach it was outdated techniques, which I had trouble showing them why it was outdated because if it worked for them they didn't think it was outdated. My senior project was a complete failure because I wanted to make something short and sweet, and they thought because it was going to be 30 seconds of 3D animation (which is a lot of work for one person), I was being lazy and they expected it to be Pixar quality. I argued with two of the teachers forever, and got this as a final answer: They rather have a 3 minute unfinished film that looks ok than a 30second mock advertisement that looked great. Instead of working on the 3d models and prepping them for rigging, the teachers rather have me work on storyboards for 3 months and then expect the rest of it finished in the last 3 months of the senior year (literally left notes on my desk and interrupted my working on it until I made more storyboards). This is not a lot of room for testing or rigging or exploring new techniques etc. as none of them knew how to do anything to begin with, not to mention wiggle room for rendering and rerendering things that were broken. They tried this same mentality with another student and that irked me, so I told them it's not her fault no one taught her how to properly do anything (eventually a lot of the students started fucking around with the teachers when they ran into a problem they knew the teacher didn't know how to fix, and that is what 30k a year got you).

    A lot of the courses you'll be taking aren't free reign all the time. The teachers aren't going to say 'Off and create amazing characters!'. The lessons are project based and will have restrictions, they're meant to teach you things, not always to create amazing images. Obviously each teacher is different, and some of my foundation class teachers were more open to creativity than others (sounds weird, but I don't know how else to describe it).

    A tour of the colleges is meant to make you feel good about that college so that you apply. To get a realistic view of the college, talk to the students without the teachers around or the HR or tour guides. They'll speak much more openly on their experiences, what classes they liked or didn't like.

    Another thing to keep in mind: A good art school on your resume shouldn't be a reason why you're hired. If an employer cares more about your college than your work, there's an issue. At one point, art colleges didn't exist, and people still got hired for companies like Pixar and Disney and Cartoon Network etc.

    More to remember: There are single classes you can take for drawing, even gatherings for live model drawing sessions. Take THOSE. This way you're not shelling out thousands of dollars, but you can still get the experience and feedback you need. A lot of these colleges will have summer programs that are pretty much the same as those taught in the actual BFA degree program.

    There are many sites out there you can join to learn. lynda.com is one of them (some of my teachers had us watch those videos to learn from instead of teaching us lolol, but they're actually informative and useful), http://www.fxphd.com/ you can learn compositing, after effects, and more. It's a bit more pricey but you can actually get a certificate and get feedback on your work. EDIT: fxphd is also taught by professionals. I can't think of a better opportunity to network than that.

    2D Animation: The Animator's Survival Kit by Richard Williams was the most popular animation book. Everyone swore by it. I never bought it, or looked at it, but I can't imagine a squash and stretch based animation is out of date (that's the basic of all animation, never forget it).

    Always use references, go the zoo and draw animals (or people), use the library. The rest is on you.
    Last edited by insanejoker; 04-02-2014 at 06:00 PM.

  9. #9
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


    Weasyl
    QTMelon
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    1,478
    You can go to Ateliers or cons for networking or even art camps. A lot of college networking is here or there because a lot of problems students ran into was those industry professionals were just seeing teaching students as an in between for the next big gig.

    Workshops also help.

    Is that the years I have watched art education is that the costs are definitely outweighing the benefits. Education helps a lot but if you pay off the loans and at the expense of future home ownership just to get by, is not sound in my opinion.

    A lot of it falls on the person, not just the instructors.
    Last edited by QT Melon; 04-02-2014 at 05:32 PM.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by insanejoker View Post
    NO, no no no no no. A thousand times no.

    Art school is beneficial if:
    You become the favorite of the staff.
    You already have a high level of skill.
    You don't want to be different.
    You do as the teacher says.
    You don't mind not thinking for yourself or not questioning what is taught.
    You are ready to take every word the teachers say as pure gold, even if it contradicts real world experiences people have told you about.
    See this is where what I said about it depending on the school comes in cause what is said above isn't true of every single art school or art prof at all.

    Moogle, about worrying about learning something you may not use, don't worry about that. My experience is that even if it isn't directly in the medium you want to work in, it's still good information to have and there probably will be an application for it in your art. A lot of what I learned in watercolor for example really helped me with my digital art. A lot of what I learned between sculpture and figure drawing has also helped me with my drawings and such as well. It became much easier to see things in a 3d way for me after those classes.


    There's also the added benefit of having peers to talk to and nick ideas/processes from (admittedly you can do the same thing by joining an art society, but it's harder to join those if you aren't already somewhat established) The teachers can be good for feedback and also sharing resources/processes/and suggesting artists to look at, but what studio courses I've taken, I've almost always found a bigger benefit talking to my peers, that or the younger teachers who are still experimenting a lot with their processes.

    Or to use an example, one of my painter/sculpture undergrad friends was experimenting with polyurethane coats on her work, one of the graduates thought it looked neat and was like "I'm totally stealing this". He ended up not really going in that direction with his art in the long run, but it was still an interesting exercise for him just playing with that particular surface treatment.

    ...Also sorry I'm typing bunches and bunches...

    In the long run, you can get similar ends without going to an art school, although it may take a bit more work. I really loved being able to pick the brains of the professors and others students when I was at school for all manner of information myself. While at the same time being staunchly stubborn about doing what I want to do rather than what will please the proffs (from my understanding most of the prof's actually loved it when their students were headstrong and got a bee in their butt to proove what they were doing was valid despite anything the prof may tell them in the long run it'd just better everyones art). The only reason I didn't move on to a studio major after finishing my education major is because I am not prolific enough nor developed enough in my own personal style to be considered "ready" to be let into their sculpture program.
    Fish heads! Fish heads! Rolly polly fish heads! Fish heads! Fish heads! Eat them up! Yum!

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •