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  1. #1
    Junior Coconutcandies's Avatar
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    Your pose process?

    Okay so I think that I'm relatively good at art, not amazing but good.
    The one thing that I truly have trouble with aside from expressions are poses and it infuriates me because most of the time I can only draw them in just a basic standing pose. I've googled my question many many times and I haven't really found anything, so I figured I'd ask here.
    How did you guys learn/do your pose process? If that makes sense at all.

    Any advice would be helpful!

  2. #2
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


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    I believe this thread has quite a bit of insight https://forums.weasyl.com/vbulletin/...ou-practice-it

    In order to get better at poses, you have to make a lot of poses. This helps you build your references in doing poses.

    I guess to put it in another perspective, imagine going to the forums on how to drive a car. People will write it out and it seems easy enough, until you actually get in the car. You freak out and don't want to try again.

    Basically you don't get better at driving, unless you...well actually drive. There's tips and teachers as well as peers to help you out, but in the end, you need to learn how to steer, what to look out for and when it is appropriate to turn, apply gas and all those other wonderful things in learning how to drive.

    Now, I'm definitely not saying to not go to a forum for advice, but remember that a lot of this is going to be you making a lot of crappy results until you get the feel for it. Gesture is definitely an important step, learning how to see is just as important to learn how to draw.

  3. #3
    Junior Coconutcandies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QT Melon View Post
    I believe this thread has quite a bit of insight https://forums.weasyl.com/vbulletin/...ou-practice-it

    In order to get better at poses, you have to make a lot of poses. This helps you build your references in doing poses.

    I guess to put it in another perspective, imagine going to the forums on how to drive a car. People will write it out and it seems easy enough, until you actually get in the car. You freak out and don't want to try again.

    Basically you don't get better at driving, unless you...well actually drive. There's tips and teachers as well as peers to help you out, but in the end, you need to learn how to steer, what to look out for and when it is appropriate to turn, apply gas and all those other wonderful things in learning how to drive.

    Now, I'm definitely not saying to not go to a forum for advice, but remember that a lot of this is going to be you making a lot of crappy results until you get the feel for it. Gesture is definitely an important step, learning how to see is just as important to learn how to draw.
    Thanks so much for the advice!
    I always take my drawings too seriously, even doodles or sketches. Anytime I've tried to do gesture drawing I just get so frustrated if its not perfect. Fatal flaw I suppose haha

  4. #4
    ~Kupo~ Moogle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coconutcandies View Post
    Thanks so much for the advice!
    I always take my drawings too seriously, even doodles or sketches. Anytime I've tried to do gesture drawing I just get so frustrated if its not perfect. Fatal flaw I suppose haha
    I used to be the same way! But after doing gestures for about an hour, you're kinda like like 'eh fork it, gonna do dis the ugly way' and it actually turns out better like that. Poses are still quite a challenge for me, however the more you do it the more it gets ingrained into your head like QT stated. Just remember though, flow is a huge part of a gesture. If you're able to see movement even down to the most simplified lines, then you know you're doing good!

  5. #5
    Senior Zeitzbach's Avatar
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    Drawing poses is really something you learn by building experience and coming up with your own tricks. Find the one your comfortable with the most.

    Like, most people would recommend using coil tactics and stuffs for pose with foreshortening. I never got used to that and decided to just go with the "3 circle -> Connect like an idiot -> Add half-ass shade for depth" and I've been using that for the recent ref practice and I'm happy with it.

    So yeah, just keep drawing and drawing and drawing. Using a ref is not cheating. You will get used to drawing specific poses and angle after drawing it at least 70x and come up with your own tricks in the end. And remember, you will never achieve true perfection. Perfection is a goal that is constantly evolving. You will always be chasing after it and grow, but will never reach it. It will always persuade you to learn more and more. "a true master is an eternal student".

    but having said that, don't even think of using "nothing is perfect" to half-ass your stuffs.

  6. #6
    Senior Ruggy's Avatar
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    I almost always start a drawing session with something like 15 or so minutes of gesture drawing (using quickposes or pixelovely if I'm near a computer, or anyone standing nearby if I'm not.) It helps!

    If I'm thinking of something specific, like, "I would like to draw a character on a bicycle," I'll draw a few different thumbnails of roughly how I'd like it to look, and either A. take a photograph myself (best!) or B. look for appropriate references that fit my idea.

    And even if I'm drawing a pose I am familiar with, I'll still check myself in the mirror, or photos, or whatever's handy, just to make sure I'm on the right track. It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking, "Oh, I've drawn this kind of pose so often, I have it down pat," and then figure out you've been drawing the shoulder in the wrong place the entire time.

    Basically, references are your friends.
    Formerly gorgonops. I do art-type stuff.

  7. #7
    I do a mix of just scribbling wildly until something comes out, and then getting lots of references if I can't push into the refinement phase on my own. (which is a vast majority of the time, for anything other than my favorite pokemon lol and a few of my fanmade digimon)

    When I use references I normally use lots of them to get an overall idea of how something should be shaped, and to help solidify how things bend and stuff cause my memory doesn't seem to be capable of holding onto those nuances on its own. I've found it's much easier for me to understand and draw something if I have a 3D understanding of its shape,which I won't get from individual pictures. But If I have a lot of pictures or better yet a scale model that I can turn around in my hands it's much easier.

    I think the real funny part is that I got better at using references from doing pokemon fan-art. Before I'd start drawing I'd use the image archive on bulbapedia for whatever Pokemon it was to get a better idea of what they look like and how they've been depicted as moving (and also to make sure I get a pose that isn't too similar to one that exists in the official art). It's transferred over quite well to my non-pokemon artwork.
    Fish heads! Fish heads! Rolly polly fish heads! Fish heads! Fish heads! Eat them up! Yum!

  8. #8
    Hmm,

    I used to do posemaniacs daily over the summer (:

    They have this timed drawing thing where basically a pose flashes on the screen and the objective is to get the general gestures on paper, focusing on the form as a whole, rather than the details ~ I think you can change the time intervals too ~

    I never used it, but the program that I use to draw in has a 3D model in it. It's called Clip Studio Paint (Pro)

  9. #9
    Senior Charrio's Avatar
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    For me, I started in PinUps and it taught me a lot of the classic poses we all know, but then had to branch out.
    Taking examples from some old clothing catalog I had at the time, thumbnailed most of the pics to get their poses or the basic ideas.

    Took me much practice but now I'm not afraid of a pose or the dreaded hands.
    It may take me some thinking and thumbnailing to figure it out, but the thing is mainly you have to try and push yourself out of your comfort zones.
    Might not come out perfect when its a new try, but you learn as you go too.
    Take a gander at my Gallery here, hope you like and brings a smile.
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  10. #10
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


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    Quote Originally Posted by child View Post
    Hmm,

    I used to do posemaniacs daily over the summer (:

    They have this timed drawing thing where basically a pose flashes on the screen and the objective is to get the general gestures on paper, focusing on the form as a whole, rather than the details ~ I think you can change the time intervals too ~

    I never used it, but the program that I use to draw in has a 3D model in it. It's called Clip Studio Paint (Pro)
    3D models aren't that great. Now they are just a tool and can help, but most people learning anatomy don't realize how messed up the model can get due to rigging.

    That is why I no longer recommend 3d models for leaning gesture. Get a live model or photos from other sites that do gesture. Especially since you will also look at more body types that way instead of a stock model

 

 

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