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  1. #11
    Senior ShadWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightpaws View Post
    Sounds like not many of you have managed to get much out of them yet!

    The Daisy Chained mining thing sounds pretty interesting but with people networking entire server farms, the chances of seeing a return on them is probably zilch these days. It could probably be used as a lightweight server for your home network if you fancied, though heat might be an issue for it if it's on 24/7.

    I don't have one so I can't comment on that though. Would you guys say they're worth the investment for playing around with?
    This guy's rig setup of 24x Raspberry Pi's he setup with a custom made rig shelf with 24 fans powered through USB.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadWolf View Post
    This guy's rig setup of 24x Raspberry Pi's he setup with a custom made rig shelf with 24 fans powered through USB.
    Wow. That's quite something. We're now discussing the possibility of having a networked "Pi Lab" at university for people to work on their programming. Are they good enough to run things like Eclipse or d'you think I'd need to put something else on them?

  3. #13
    Solifugid Onnes's Avatar
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    Most of my projects are better suited for an Arduino than a Pi, so I haven't looked into them much. The Pi cluster is the thing that's most interesting to me, but that kind of application is a pretty serious time and money investment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightpaws View Post
    Wow. That's quite something. We're now discussing the possibility of having a networked "Pi Lab" at university for people to work on their programming. Are they good enough to run things like Eclipse or d'you think I'd need to put something else on them?
    Eclipse is pretty much a poster child for resource inefficient applications. I don't know how it'll run on the Pi, but I've seen it struggle on beefier systems without lots of configuration tweaking and moon cycle analysis.

  4. #14
    Regular irick's Avatar
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    In general: stay away from java on the Pi. The limited ram will quickly get eaten up. Python development on the Pi should be fine though, or any non-compile-to-bytecode interpreted language.

    Wayland works wonderfully o the Pi too, I should probably pick one up and see if i can't get a nice looking little development distro built.

  5. #15
    Junior koregg's Avatar
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    The second I heard about this amazing credit-card sized computer I had to buy it. Now it's a $35 paper weight, I always planned on doing something interesting. My friend Alex does some neat stuff with his at least

  6. #16
    Ah, that might be an issue. Was going to see about using some to assist people struggling with coding in Java. They'd be okay with C though right?

  7. #17
    Junior LeoTheDog's Avatar
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    I'm planning on getting two, soon. I want to make on into a retro emulator. Fill it with old school games. and the second one is going to be for a file server. I might buy a third one just to tinker with, but that's for the future =v=

  8. #18
    Regular irick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightpaws View Post
    Ah, that might be an issue. Was going to see about using some to assist people struggling with coding in Java. They'd be okay with C though right?
    If you are writing code as an academic study, it should be fine with either. The issue is going to be loading up large projects into a JVM, it'll run most likely but it's going to take a while to load initially. Especially if you are using a big java IDE.
    Python and Perl are probably going to be your winners in terms of efficent usage on the pi for large projects. C is obviously going to require a compile step, so anything too big is going to take a while. Just remember these things are amazing, but they aren't really even as fast as a PIII when it comes down to the ALU.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by irick View Post
    If you are writing code as an academic study, it should be fine with either. The issue is going to be loading up large projects into a JVM, it'll run most likely but it's going to take a while to load initially. Especially if you are using a big java IDE.
    Python and Perl are probably going to be your winners in terms of efficent usage on the pi for large projects. C is obviously going to require a compile step, so anything too big is going to take a while. Just remember these things are amazing, but they aren't really even as fast as a PIII when it comes down to the ALU.
    Good points there. I'm wondering now if for my group we'd be as well seeing if we can do a deal and just get regular lab machines dual booting. I might make the PI thing into a project for some basic C compilation and scripting stuff.

 

 

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