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  1. #21
    Gender hasn't been a factor in any of my pets (other than for fish, I try to make sure to have more females than males).

    My first pet that I got on my own was a cat and he picked me in a way. He was getting annoyed with all the other cats rolling around at the shelter, so I grabbed him into my lap and he just sort of settled there. So I took him home. Never had trouble with spraying, although he did like to push things from great heights when he was young. (Both for amusement I think, but also if he wanted attention). He doesn't do that any more, and he's a great snuggler. He's also a big boy, not fat but he's got a very big frame. He weighs in at around 13 pounds of fairly large red tabby.

    The other pets I have are cats, both female...they sort of chose us (they were strays, a mom and her kitten). The mom is pretty sweet, if a little bit wary at times it's generally a bad idea to touch her if she doesn't know you're there, or to startle her. The kitten is an energetic little rocket butt, especially when food is involved. I think mostly cause she was the runt, so always had to be fast to get food when she was still outside. She constantly wants to wrestle and play with everything, and she likes to talk a lot.

    The vet told us that the mother cat is always going to be grumpy with her kitten even after they are both fixed, reasoning that all female things often have trouble getting along, but I'm really skeptical of this logic for obvious reasons...

  2. #22
    Senior Carnau's Avatar
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    They need to be intelligent enough to keep up with me. I don't want to have to tell it how to do every singular thing when it's well into it's adult age. It seems harsh but true. I mean I've had smart and dumb dogs though my life, I know what it's like.
    A lot of people will end up picking the less intelligent dog over the smart one because they're "cute," not knowing that this means they're work in training and living with the dog will be so much harder now.
    Quote Originally Posted by voicebox64
    Now he can have all the turkey with pillowy mounds of mashed potatoes, butter drenched dressing and tiny onions swimming in a sea of cream sauce he wants.

  3. #23
    Senior Gamedog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carnau View Post
    They need to be intelligent enough to keep up with me. I don't want to have to tell it how to do every singular thing when it's well into it's adult age. It seems harsh but true. I mean I've had smart and dumb dogs though my life, I know what it's like.
    A lot of people will end up picking the less intelligent dog over the smart one because they're "cute," not knowing that this means they're work in training and living with the dog will be so much harder now.
    Training is a life-long commitment, dogs are not programmable and do not live with "set it and forget it". Most people don't realize that you will be continuing to train and reinforce training all throughout the dog's life.
    Just because a puppy is taught how to sit when he is 4 months does not mean that he will not have to be reinforced and encouraged to perform that same trick when he's 7 years old.

    (Though.. you are correct with the bit about some dogs being a bit.... slower than others)

  4. #24
    Senior Carnau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gamedog View Post
    Training is a life-long commitment, dogs are not programmable and do not live with "set it and forget it". Most people don't realize that you will be continuing to train and reinforce training all throughout the dog's life.
    Just because a puppy is taught how to sit when he is 4 months does not mean that he will not have to be reinforced and encouraged to perform that same trick when he's 7 years old.

    (Though.. you are correct with the bit about some dogs being a bit.... slower than others)
    I can tell the difference between a dog and a cat thanks (b'-')b
    Quote Originally Posted by voicebox64
    Now he can have all the turkey with pillowy mounds of mashed potatoes, butter drenched dressing and tiny onions swimming in a sea of cream sauce he wants.

  5. #25
    Senior Rico's Avatar
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    With social animals or animals that can be in pairs, I tend to get same sex pairs. Exception: cats. My partner and I got a brother/sister pair because we wanted 2 cats that knew each other since we would be working sometimes and didn't want them to go stir crazy. Siblings of course fit that, and my partner likes gray cats. So we found a brother/sister pair that were gray and very affectionate at an adoption event. Love at first sight blah blah blah. They've been awesome ever since.
    For snakes, I have zero preference. Females if they're priced the same as males (because they're more valuable and I might have breeding plans), and generally whatever the best example of the morph they have is. Ex: there's two lessers in a cage and one looks nice and patterned and light and the other looks like a mojave. I'm getting the former because it's a better example of that morph even if I'm not breeding it because IT MATTERS TO ME OKAY q_q. Health is number one deciding factor though because a pretty snake is useless if it never eats. Cats are eehhh on health because almost all kittens are wormy infected little things. It's hard to judge.

    When I get a dog in the future I want something that: won't kill the cats, is okay with strangers (not necessarily with other dogs because I only want one dog so whatever, DA is pretty easy to deal with in a super controlled area), isn't food aggressive, and doesn't need 10 miles of hiking every day for exercise. I'd like something that looks shepherd-y but that's optional.
    avatar is by me forgetting to change this

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carnau View Post
    I can tell the difference between a dog and a cat thanks (b'-')b
    ....?????

    Quote Originally Posted by Rico View Post
    With social animals or animals that can be in pairs, I tend to get same sex pairs. Exception: cats.
    Yeah, male pairs can be a bit of trouble if they're not related.. and even if they are related there can still be pretty rough scraps.
    I've got one female cat and two males, and one of the males is constantly trying to hump the female cat, despite him being neutered and she being spayed. It's quite annoying to hear that annoying purr-meow and constant bickering while I'm trying to sleep.
    I've found that male cats also tend to be snugglier than females, are yours very snuggly and enjoy being held?

  7. #27
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    I get both genders so it's not really the biggest factor for me. I have Syrians so they all have to be kept in their own separate cages. Males tend to be easier to tame but I've discovered they're a lot easier to tame with a female around. I will pick up a female first so that when I go to the males cage, he detects her scent on me and is a lot calmer because he's in Barry White mode.

    Females can get more possessive and some people can't stand their scent during estrus but with the right amount of taming you can get them to mellow out as well.

  8. #28
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    Since I'm a cat person (although I love dogs too!) I'm going to put what I look for in cats.

    Gender isn't really a factor for me, although I lean towards females.
    I like chubby cats. ^^ But not to the point of unhealthy! Just something to squeeze~
    I generally adopt shelter cats. I look for the ones that need love the most (so older cats usually, or cats that have been there for a long time). That being said, I want a friendly and laid-back cat.
    And, kind of a bonus thing for me, I tend to look for cats that have already had kittens. Not just because if I ever get a kitten they'll be a bit more relaxed with it, but because I know that when that cat passes away, they'll have little versions of themselves out there. c:
    If there's water in watermelons, then what are in kumquats?

  9. #29
    Senior Zeitzbach's Avatar
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    One that won't die so easily.

    About 7 dogs are resting deeply atm. Damn cars and the fact that dogs love to go fuck around and eat poisoned trash instead of staying at home and eat the food we prepared at night.

  10. #30
    When I had hamsters, I usually got female ones just because they were more readily available at local pet stores (Petsmart doesn't have male ones, or at least not at the location near me). As for my rabbits, I originally thought the two I got were male and female, but eventually discovered they were both male.

 

 

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