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  1. #11
    Regular marchen's Avatar
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    Comics!

    A good way to get going is to do scripts [but that is optional. I just find it easier]
    thumbnails
    rough sketches
    lines
    etc

    Here is an example of each in my work:
    thumbnails
    rough idea sketch
    full sketch and lining

    I also left them at full size to show how large I work at. Honestly the size of the canvas doesn't always matter unless you are printing but it CAN help you. It does allow more room for sketching and filling the panels. You just have to plan and work on how to fill your pages. Which can be very difficult if you haven't been working in comics before.

    I suggest going and studying some of your favorites. See how they fill the pages. For example you could have a page like thisl compared to something like this. How they fill the panels could solely depend on the page's purpose.

    Even if it is just dialog the panels can be rearranged to make it visually interesting.

    Sorry for the info dump, I just wanted to try and cover a little bit of everything.

  2. #12
    Senior Rinzy's Avatar
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    Are you trying to wing it, or do you have thumbnails for each page? I think it's a bit easier when you've got it all thumbnailed out, with rough ideas for placement and speech bubbles.

    Making everything fit, make sense, and work together as a page is a great exercise in coming up with different camera-angle solutions, too.

  3. #13
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


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    Planning is very key. You should remember to do the following.

    Thumbnails. Thumbnails are very important to pre planning panel layout.

    The other important factor is to work zoomed out. A panel should hold up as well at a quarter of the intended size as it would at half and full size.

    It may not solve all problems, but I believe will save time on a lot of potential ones like the ones you seem to be experiencing.

  4. #14
    When I make comics I do the art first and then draw panels

  5. #15
    Senior Charrio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeitzbach View Post
    There's a reason why a comic CAN and often will take at least 3 redraws before it is complete.

    Rough
    Names
    Manu
    Actual thing.

    The bubble and thing are usually fit in the Names -> Manu part so you can readjust and move certain part to the next page instead.
    So do you include an area for dialogue when doing your rough layout?
    If so that leaves me even less room for the characters, I'll figure it out just confusing

    So many tips and good advice thank you all, I will so try them on my next page.
    Last edited by Charrio; 01-25-2014 at 06:05 PM.
    Take a gander at my Gallery here, hope you like and brings a smile.
    https://www.weasyl.com/~charrio

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Charrio View Post
    So do you include an area for dialogue when doing your rough layout?
    If so that leaves me even less room for the characters, I'll figure it out just confusing

    So many tips and good advice thank you all, I will so try them on my next page.
    Dialogue is just as important for the composition of each panel as the actual pictures, you should be getting a rough idea of where everything will be before you start on the final image. Dialogue and bubbles are not just an after thought that you toss in after the art, they are part of the art form.

    My thumbnails do typically have bubbles in them (either numbered with the dialogue outside, or with tiny writing squeezed in). If I'm having trouble visualizing sometimes I'll actually draw something from a thumbnail even bigger with no panel, or I'll draw the things breaking out if I'm having trouble keeping the proportions proper in the panel. I like to use my thumbnailing as a third go at editing my dialogue as well.


    (I'm going to categorically disagree with the "size doesn't matter" bit, working larger on your final image allows for more detail and is just easier for drawing without running into trouble with things muddying together, I'm not saying it's required but it's easier, there are some great artist who draw very tiny and detailed, however even they have to work outside their comfort zone and work big when going digital.

  7. #17
    Senior Charrio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchen View Post
    Comics!

    A good way to get going is to do scripts [but that is optional. I just find it easier]
    thumbnails
    rough sketches
    lines
    etc

    Here is an example of each in my work:
    thumbnails
    rough idea sketch
    full sketch and lining

    I also left them at full size to show how large I work at. Honestly the size of the canvas doesn't always matter unless you are printing but it CAN help you. It does allow more room for sketching and filling the panels. You just have to plan and work on how to fill your pages. Which can be very difficult if you haven't been working in comics before.

    I suggest going and studying some of your favorites. See how they fill the pages. For example you could have a page like thisl compared to something like this. How they fill the panels could solely depend on the page's purpose.

    Even if it is just dialog the panels can be rearranged to make it visually interesting.

    Sorry for the info dump, I just wanted to try and cover a little bit of everything.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rinzy View Post
    Are you trying to wing it, or do you have thumbnails for each page? I think it's a bit easier when you've got it all thumbnailed out, with rough ideas for placement and speech bubbles.

    Making everything fit, make sense, and work together as a page is a great exercise in coming up with different camera-angle solutions, too.
    Quote Originally Posted by QT Melon View Post
    Planning is very key. You should remember to do the following.

    Thumbnails. Thumbnails are very important to pre planning panel layout.

    The other important factor is to work zoomed out. A panel should hold up as well at a quarter of the intended size as it would at half and full size.

    It may not solve all problems, but I believe will save time on a lot of potential ones like the ones you seem to be experiencing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chesse20 View Post
    When I make comics I do the art first and then draw panels
    Quote Originally Posted by lorenith View Post
    Dialogue is just as important for the composition of each panel as the actual pictures, you should be getting a rough idea of where everything will be before you start on the final image. Dialogue and bubbles are not just an after thought that you toss in after the art, they are part of the art form.

    My thumbnails do typically have bubbles in them (either numbered with the dialogue outside, or with tiny writing squeezed in). If I'm having trouble visualizing sometimes I'll actually draw something from a thumbnail even bigger with no panel, or I'll draw the things breaking out if I'm having trouble keeping the proportions proper in the panel. I like to use my thumbnailing as a third go at editing my dialogue as well.


    (I'm going to categorically disagree with the "size doesn't matter" bit, working larger on your final image allows for more detail and is just easier for drawing without running into trouble with things muddying together, I'm not saying it's required but it's easier, there are some great artist who draw very tiny and detailed, however even they have to work outside their comfort zone and work big when going digital.
    I have to admit, I am terrible at just winging it as I go.
    Drawing it out and not even knowing where i am going and just letting my mind have fun.
    Now tho I have been trying to do the story first and then draw from there.

    Here is a example of my Insanity, WARNING ADULT STUFF
    https://www.weasyl.com/submission/40...-01-unfinished
    Take a gander at my Gallery here, hope you like and brings a smile.
    https://www.weasyl.com/~charrio

  8. #18
    Layout is key. Have a plan for what you want to show in the page, how far the story has to advance, what kind of "beat" you want to the panels. A lot of panels means a lot of action or change and usually little dialogue per panel. A personal rule of my own was to have one "rest" page per seven or eight pages - a full page illustration to either establish or set mood or just to pause a moment if the pace was a bit much. Doesn't have to be a full page either - a 2/3 top panel is often enough for this.

    It's more like music in some respects, how and when you construct panels. Consider that a storyboard in a movie or cartoon or television show is nothing more than a series of same-sized cartoon or comic panels. You can reverse that, consider yourself as a cameraman when setting a scene. What do you need to show? What don't you need to show, or establish? Have you moved the camera too much for people to follow?

    Thumbnail the page entirely - panels only - with your dialogue. It can guide your art until you get a better feel for it, for how much room you need for dialogue.

  9. #19
    Senior Charrio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garhammer View Post
    Layout is key. Have a plan for what you want to show in the page, how far the story has to advance, what kind of "beat" you want to the panels. A lot of panels means a lot of action or change and usually little dialogue per panel. A personal rule of my own was to have one "rest" page per seven or eight pages - a full page illustration to either establish or set mood or just to pause a moment if the pace was a bit much. Doesn't have to be a full page either - a 2/3 top panel is often enough for this.

    It's more like music in some respects, how and when you construct panels. Consider that a storyboard in a movie or cartoon or television show is nothing more than a series of same-sized cartoon or comic panels. You can reverse that, consider yourself as a cameraman when setting a scene. What do you need to show? What don't you need to show, or establish? Have you moved the camera too much for people to follow?

    Thumbnail the page entirely - panels only - with your dialogue. It can guide your art until you get a better feel for it, for how much room you need for dialogue.
    Thank you, I hadn't thought about the rest pic for a page.
    I'm kinda lost when doing some things as I fumble my way through it mostly.
    Great advice, and I thank you again for it.
    Take a gander at my Gallery here, hope you like and brings a smile.
    https://www.weasyl.com/~charrio

  10. #20
    Sure. I posted two old comic pages that detail some of this. First is a "rest" page
    https://www.weasyl.com/submission/40...ny-example-one
    second is an action page
    https://www.weasyl.com/submission/40...ny-example-two
    The panel change to circular is to emphasize the stop in dialogue. This is something unusual, ergo spotlight panel.

 

 

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