Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Cseritos View Post
    I like archery, of the traditional sorts. Interested in making my own bow, as well, I currently have wood 'curing' for that process. I don't do any like... competitive shoots or anything, just for a hobby. :3
    That would be cool , my friend made a bow, but I have no such skills lol.


    Quote Originally Posted by Batty Krueger View Post
    My best friend is, I beleive everything he uses is by hoyt.
    Thats cool, I dont know a lot about the brands at the moment



    Quote Originally Posted by SirCoffeecup View Post
    My brother was into archery and it got me interested in it as well. A great sport. I always just borrowed his stuff, which were pretty good.
    A hunting bow and a recurve bow. I preferred the hunting one. Was more powerful and felt better. Was easier to aim too when it took some of the force away.
    Do you mean a compound bow? Where the poundage you hold back at full draw is greatly reduced one you hit the wall. Its made to be easy to hold at full and of course the technology makes it stronger.
    I have shot a traditional hunting bow with a poundage of 65lb's and I can certainly say I could defiantly feel the strain on my shoulder after that lol

  2. #12
    I am curious in learning about archery but I don't know of anything to practice with. I don't have many trees at my house and my fences are deteriorating at best. I'd be afraid if I took a whack at it, it'll all come falling down. D:

    I see those little junior archery sets at my sporting goods store but I dunno if they're good. They're alright for my size (I'm kinda short, 5'2") but I dunno if they would break easily or not. I'm not even sure where to look. Any advice for beginners?

  3. #13
    Senior SirCoffeecup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    The cold north
    Posts
    903
    Ah yes, a compound bow. I'm not too familiar with the archery terminology in English.
    I can't quite remember the pounds in it. Less than 80 I think.

    Now if you feel it on your shoulder, I think you're doing it wrong. It ought to be the back doing the work, am I right?

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Dspki View Post
    I am curious in learning about archery but I don't know of anything to practice with. I don't have many trees at my house and my fences are deteriorating at best. I'd be afraid if I took a whack at it, it'll all come falling down. D:

    I see those little junior archery sets at my sporting goods store but I dunno if they're good. They're alright for my size (I'm kinda short, 5'2") but I dunno if they would break easily or not. I'm not even sure where to look. Any advice for beginners?
    I would also recommend this to you
    Quote Originally Posted by Sammacha View Post
    That's cool, its such a shame when you have something you want to use but no where to use it. However have you considered buying a hamster wood chip bail thing? They aren't expensive and actually work fairly well as a target butt. They can be found in pet shops usually for under $50 (and that's a really big bail).
    I know if I had a terrible stance my regular bow would cause strain but it does not. 65lb is simply too much for me at this time to use constantly without being a compound bow.

    I know that college is huge time burden though , good luck btw

    I think the average starting weight is about 20-25lb's, but it depends on your strength, maybe thats what you had?
    I would not recommend a large store junior archer set, they usually aren't really very good, they are, well cheap. I would recommend going to a specialty store as a basic bow, with good equipment isn't at all as expensive as one might think. They make bows of all sizes, you could start with a basic take down bow, which allows you to upgrade later on with improvement.


    Quote Originally Posted by SirCoffeecup View Post
    Ah yes, a compound bow. I'm not too familiar with the archery terminology in English.
    I can't quite remember the pounds in it. Less than 80 I think.

    Now if you feel it on your shoulder, I think you're doing it wrong. It ought to be the back doing the work, am I right?
    Well yes the pain is in the back, but I believe its a shoulder thing. Sadly I have forgotten the name of the actual muscle or I would know if the pain I was feeling was the back under/at the shoulder blade ( I think its like a trapezoid shape muscle as well), and believe it or not shoulder strain is a very common injury when dealing with bow and arrow.
    http://bowsite.com/bowsite/features/bowdoc/shoulder/
    And yes, I was probably doing it wrong (after the first 2 sets of arrows), at such a high poundage continuous use causes a huge strain, especially when you are not used to it. This is why I comfortably shoot a 35 or 40 lb and not a 60lb. I also have no need for it and was just trying it out. It's fine for a bit but after shooting X amount of arrows it gets very tiring. This happens to most people shooting high pound traditional bows, at least amongst the group of people I talk to.
    I think it also depends on which of your muscle are stronger, maybe I have a stronger back muscle compared to my shoulder which also suffered a rotator cuff injury?
    Last edited by Sammacha; 01-24-2014 at 09:15 PM.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Sammacha View Post
    I do know Kyudo, though I have never tried. To my knowledge the main difference is that your left hand holds the bow and the your right hand draws the string. That may have changed but this was the traditional way. Also the bow is much larger and of a different style.
    Other then that I am assuming the concept is quite similar, where you learn good form, concentration and the motion of aim, draw, anchor, release.
    Your friends dad must have been a very interesting guy to have written such books. Archery to some is a great for of meditation. You really need to be able to concentrate and know your body ie: muscle memory and aim point.

    I think that if you had enjoyed it in the past it might be interesting to look into sometime in the future. I'm very much enjoying it now but much like all my other hobbies I will eventually put it away to try something new but I will always go back to it.
    Yes, the left hand holding the bow is what I experienced, although if one seriously approaches Kyudo, it's awhile until you even take your first shot. It's all about posture, form, breathing, and a state of zen through archery. Discipline in all facets, basically.

    Oh he was! I met the guy because his dad is also a professor at the big state university (UW-Madison), which is how I found him in the first place; he was running them out of a university building for anyone interested. I feel a bit ashamed because my own university had an archery club/team and I was friends with people in it, but.. they had a "reputation" and I never bothered to try it out. Oh well, when you want to do something, you will find a way.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Rory View Post
    Yes, the left hand holding the bow is what I experienced, although if one seriously approaches Kyudo, it's awhile until you even take your first shot. It's all about posture, form, breathing, and a state of zen through archery. Discipline in all facets, basically.

    Oh he was! I met the guy because his dad is also a professor at the big state university (UW-Madison), which is how I found him in the first place; he was running them out of a university building for anyone interested. I feel a bit ashamed because my own university had an archery club/team and I was friends with people in it, but.. they had a "reputation" and I never bothered to try it out. Oh well, when you want to do something, you will find a way.
    Yes I feel the overall approach to it is different, but its a cultural thing imo.
    The form and breathing is a very important aspect and I've stood on the field doing nothing. I probably look silly to most people but there are so many different exercises that you can do these days. Hard to know which is best.
    One of the best tips I was given was, repeat your form even when you miss. Unless of course you are missing the entire butt, if so move closer.
    If you have consistent form, your arrows will be consistent. Meaning, learn your form, group your arrows then concentrate on hitting the bulls eye. When you can hit the center of the target 90% or more that's when you start going for the distance.
    I think that this is one thing that archery no matter what style has in common.

  7. #17
    Junior Xolani's Avatar
    Weasyl
    Xolani
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Liverpool, UK
    Posts
    24
    Last edited by Xolani; 01-28-2014 at 09:28 PM.

  8. #18
    Senior Littlerock's Avatar

    Weasyl
    Littlerock
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    bunk bed
    Gender
    N/A
    Posts
    210
    I shot some back in highschool, and I'd love to start up again, but there's nowhere within walking distance that I can practice (without getting in trouble). I own a Jeffrey 44magnum compound, with, iirc, a 75 poundage pull and 25 letoff, and a left-handed 30-ish pound pull fiberglass recurve I found in somebody's trash. I can't pull the Jeffrey back more than a few inches, and even if I do get the muscle to in the future, it'll likely damage my shoulder, THANKS OBAMA.

    I practice pulling lefty on the recurve in my basement sometimes, but not too often.

  9. #19

  10. #20
    Senior Littlerock's Avatar

    Weasyl
    Littlerock
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    bunk bed
    Gender
    N/A
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by Sammacha View Post
    Really? no where at all? That sucks man, there's gotta be some place >.<

    Ah... I also have a lefty bow, my uncle left it when he passed away. I really wanted to do archery so I took it, its also a 75lb bow. I dont have trouble pulling it back to the wall, I think it's just practice or do you have kind of injury already? I know someone at the range who has an injured shoulder so he wont use a box heavier then 40lb's even though pulling it is not the issue.
    I'd just use my own back yard if it weren't locally illegal, and the closest range is 20 odd miles away.

    I'm kinda little, 70's a lot of weight for me, and my joints tend to partially dislocate pretty easily (and totally dislocate rarely, but wow it still smarts), and I've had my shoulders go out from less, so it's a risk I'm not keen on taking. ;v; My luck I'd be able to pull past it and keep my shoulder in, and my elbow would go out instead, haha. My tennis backhand is still rough from the last time that happened.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •