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  1. #1
    Regular chocomage's Avatar
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    Sketchbook: chocomage learns art


  2. #2
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


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    Keep going. Posting more work is a good start!

  3. #3
    Regular chocomage's Avatar
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  4. #4
    I liked the first one more. Much more dynamic. Second piece looks very flat in comparison.
    While it may sound like a recycled statement, the fact is that if you want to improve, the best way to do so is by doing studies of real objects, people and animals. Cheap paper and some pencils are the cost effective key to doing so. Its a life-long process, as an illustrator, no matter what stage you are at, you will always turn to basic studies to strengthen your skills and keep sharp. Its part of the journey.
    I personally would like to see what you can do with some pencil sketches, I think you will find you have a lot more creative freedom which may be stifled by your current digital tools. (I'm guessing paint and mouse?) Don't let the PC be the thing that holds you back as an artist.

  5. #5
    Regular chocomage's Avatar
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  6. #6
    Thanks for sharing, I'm really glad to see you sketching. (I don't have a scanner either.)
    Nothing wrong with guidelines are left over marks. Not every sketch has to be a masterpiece. My advice would be to focus on how all things, living or not can be broken down into basic shapes, these shapes are recognized by us because of light and shadow, which is how we perceive the world around us. Draw more dogs! They're excellent tools for improvement. I try sketch mine quite often, only problem is they get up right in the middle of it. So I try to capture the contours of their body, the basic shadows which make up their muscles and proportions, before trying to address details.

    I would suggest working lighter on the sketches and keeping things loose when using the pencil and always keep a reference handy, when you are not doing studies of real objects.
    I'm pleased that you opened up this thread, I hope you will share more of your stuff.

  7. #7
    Regular chocomage's Avatar
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  8. #8
    Senior TealMoon's Avatar
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    Study animals' snouts. I think it would really help. As the snouts in your newest pictures look off.
    And it's some advice I need to take myself.

  9. #9
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    Last edited by chocomage; 01-20-2014 at 03:14 PM. Reason: Circles...

  10. #10
    Be sure to keep references nearby. Especially for things like the head and the hands. IF you nail those two elements in a picture, you can get away with a lot.
    I would suggest mapping out the head as a whole, then adding the hair over it. Doing basic body sketches while studying proportion and joints will go a long way to improving your artwork.

 

 

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