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  1. #21
    Senior BlissfulOblivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thunder View Post
    Always do line art in a new layer after the sketch. If you do good, clean line art it makes colouring so much easier. Its hard to learn good line work, hell, I suck at line art, but if you choose to use it doing it properly will help immensely.
    I know. I think I know what to put in what layers (sometimes I might go a little overboard on layers...), I'm just not very good at the rest of it. Mostly this time I did line art because I'm still trying to figure out when and where not to use it, so I'm just defaulting since I'm also working on other things for the time being. Also, I'm not very good at cleaning up the shapes of just the colors yet, so line art helps cover that up.

  2. #22
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  3. #23
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  4. #24
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    Last edited by BlissfulOblivion; 01-14-2014 at 03:47 AM.

  5. #25
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


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    I only colored on top of the layer of the image. I mostly color in one layer these days and don't do any mode/layer changes. It gets confusing for me. I am not saying you cannot use those modes, but I learned more just learning how to paint. Multiply is good if you just want to keep the darkest lines. Often, I eliminate lineart.

    The problem for this picture, because I use Corel Painter was picking up the underlying color so those black lines would smudge into the picture. For choosing color in shading I often look at the background color. I find that having a background color greatly improves your coloring and prevents muddy looking coloring.

    Since Grey was a color you already chose I used it for some of the shading to give the effect of certain areas receding into the background. I could have also used the background color. Since Red is a very powerful color and the color our eyes are most drawn to, I added a lighter value and yellows to make the chest look lit. I also added a bit of blue into the grey fur to balance it out.

    Knowing where to shade has a lot to do with studying anatomy and lighting with other objects. It is understanding form of the figure. this is why I find life drawing so important to mix with my imaginative studies.

  6. #26
    Senior BlissfulOblivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QT Melon View Post
    I only colored on top of the layer of the image. I mostly color in one layer these days and don't do any mode/layer changes. It gets confusing for me. I am not saying you cannot use those modes, but I learned more just learning how to paint. Multiply is good if you just want to keep the darkest lines. Often, I eliminate lineart.
    Mmkay. I guess I still need to just mess around with all of it since I'm so new to it.
    I kind of wanted to eliminate lineart but I wasn't sure how to do that without it looking tacky or weird. Did you do some level/form of shading just around the edges to fix that/make it look more natural?

    The problem for this picture, because I use Corel Painter was picking up the underlying color so those black lines would smudge into the picture. For choosing color in shading I often look at the background color. I find that having a background color greatly improves your coloring and prevents muddy looking coloring.
    Hmm. I noticed that after the initial stuff that if I add a background it helps me see the shading better and see how the colors interact better. I think. And yeah, I also noticed that certain colors go together better. I'm not very good with color theory either but I thought this color went pretty okayish with the dark gray and red?

    Since Grey was a color you already chose I used it for some of the shading to give the effect of certain areas receding into the background. I could have also used the background color. Since Red is a very powerful color and the color our eyes are most drawn to, I added a lighter value and yellows to make the chest look lit. I also added a bit of blue into the grey fur to balance it out.
    I wanted to put the red as a lighter color but the multiply thing made it darker and I wasn't entirely sure how to fix that.
    Mmkay. So sometimes you have to use related but different colors to do shading?

    Knowing where to shade has a lot to do with studying anatomy and lighting with other objects. It is understanding form of the figure. this is why I find life drawing so important to mix with my imaginative studies.
    Okay. I think one of my problems that I now realize is that I was attempting to oversimplify lighting patterns with muscles by making them into too rigid of shapes that they simply aren't and not realizing a few things about how they run together.
    I'm just absolutely terrible with life drawings and trying to shade with a pencil. I have absolutely no idea how to do it :I I haven't taken art classes, though. I plan to do that in college.

    Thank you so much for going out of your way to help me! ; u ;

  7. #27
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


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    You need to take a moment and learn what layer modes do before asking which one to use.

    Multiply is a layer mode that leaves the darkest colors. That is why you cannot use it for highlights.

    It is best to only leave the lineart layer on multiply and leave the other layers alone.
    Last edited by QT Melon; 01-14-2014 at 07:35 PM.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by QT Melon View Post
    You need to take a moment and learn what layer modes do before asking which one to use.

    Multiply is a layer mode that leaves the darkest colors. That is why you cannot use it for highlights.

    It is best to only leave the lineart layer on multiply and leave the other layers alone.
    Oh :U I... was told differently? Mmkay, though. I'll see what I can find out. :I

  9. #29
    Regular zhuria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlissfulOblivion View Post
    Oh :U I... was told differently? Mmkay, though. I'll see what I can find out. :I
    I told you to use multiply for shading. Highlights are often done in a normal layer.
    I went with the easiest way I could think of, as multiply lets you color on top of the flat colors and fix it easily. What QT is saying is true, learning how to paint is awesome, but difficcult as colors interact with each other in different ways.
    Color theory is an amazing and extensive topic.
    I guess I won't reply here anymore, seeing as QT is quite better than me at explaining this stuff (and I don't have a lot of experience painting).

  10. #30
    Premium User QT Melon's Avatar


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    Here is an overview of layer modes.

    http://www.photoshopessentials.com/p...d-modes/intro/

    I suppose I could go on extensively about coloring, but I think a little at a time will do. There are many linked sites in the Art Forums that you can visit and learn. Part of learning is research, the other half is doing. There is a lot of trial and error.

 

 

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