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  1. #11
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    12 Angry Men! now that was a good watch!

    oh, and video editing. what software is recommended besides the ones that come with a computer?
    I have used Adobe AfterEffects before but perhaps I want to learn more about it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonata View Post
    12 Angry Men! now that was a good watch!

    oh, and video editing. what software is recommended besides the ones that come with a computer?
    I have used Adobe AfterEffects before but perhaps I want to learn more about it.
    If you have access to Final Cut Pro 7, I highly recommend that. I'm not a fan of Final Cut Pro X but at the time I was kind of strapped for cash, had a Mac, and just went that route. It's certainly usable and isn't -that- bad these days, but it's still clear that they made it more for a prosumer userbase as opposed to professionals.

    AVID is solid. Adobe Premier is great given that its built to use After Effects, Photoshop, and Illustrator in a near seemless fashion. If you're going to professional work on video, I'd suggest those three.

    But things like Sony Vegas can also get the job done. At the end of the day, all editing programs are very similar to each other so switching between them isn't that great of a leap. It's more about learning shortcuts and where all your tools are.

  3.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by XoPachi View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBK3QpQVnaw

    How do people plan this sort of thing exactly? Multiple VSauce videos, Michael is filmed in various settings but it's seamlessly done. In the latest video it was snowing in one area and then it wasn't in another, but the transition was so smooth it's as if it was filmed in a day. I know for a fact it took WAY longer than that.
    It appears that Michael already has a script and storyboard laid out before he creates these videos. He knows exactly what topic he wants to talk about, what shots he wants, and knows enough to leave himself significant padding room before and after a take so that he can cut the video to frame-perfect times. He also clearly knows how to mix his audio.

    Amazing what a little planning and some general editing knowledge can do.

  4. #14
    Oh man! I will definitely keep eyes on this thread.. Thank you for sharing your insights!

    1: What films do you like that display artful skill in the way the scenes are set up? (composition, lighting, that sort of thing)

    (Brain is fried at this hour, I'm sure I will come back with another question later haha. )

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blarm View Post
    Oh man! I will definitely keep eyes on this thread.. Thank you for sharing your insights!

    1: What films do you like that display artful skill in the way the scenes are set up? (composition, lighting, that sort of thing)

    (Brain is fried at this hour, I'm sure I will come back with another question later haha. )
    Wooooo, thanks for being patient with me Blarm. Really been getting my butt-whooped the past couple of weeks with work haha.

    As far as specific scenes its a hard question to answer off the top of my head. I'd have to go back to those I mentioned before to QT, but if you want like a director who's got a body of work with excellent lighting, composition, etc., really don't look further than Stanley Kubrick. The man had a gift with his subtle use of color and angles to help effectively tell a story. Not to mention he was innovative. The Shining which he directed was the first movie to ever use the modern Steadicam for the tricycle scene.

    Quote Originally Posted by XoPachi View Post
    This might be stupid, but in scenes where there are a TON of people in a city just casually going about their daily lives, are those people paid to do that or would you just film among common people?
    It depends on the movie.

    In The Dark Knight, the people who attended James Gordon's funeral were all extras, as are usually anyone in big period pieces where there are a ton of people in a marketplace or restaurant. Fun fact, when a scene in a restaurant with extras there to fill up tables and space are featured, these people are usually just "mouthing" conversations and not actually saying anything. This is because the microphones need to pick up sound from the actors. The crowd noise is then inserted in post-production along with music.

    In Elf, when Buddy first makes it to NYC and there's a shot of him walking down the street, that was filmed with him just walking through a group of people on the street. So it really depends on the scene, what the character(s) are doing, and what you need those extras to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by XoPachi View Post
    That answered more than I was expecting actually.
    I never thought that people talking in crowds was faked, but it makes sense. Movie magic. @w@
    As a fun little experiment, try watching an old James Bond movie when Bond is at a casino or a prize fight or what have you. Then mute the audio and you'll see how silly people must feel when they have to act like they're having the times of their lives but be completely silent.

  7. #17
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    Holy flipnuts, you've got some experience behind you. Much respect to you, sir.

    Hope these following questions make sense.

    As an amateur (someone who's only done one or two media/IT/sound courses and mucked around with some screen/short film projects for college), how would you go about:

    - presenting a professional image in the industry?
    - stepping up your game and losing that "newbiness" to your image?
    - in the case of independent production, how would you go about collaboration with other/bigger companies?
    - crowd funding?

    Thanks, your advice would be much appreciated.

  8.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #18
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    Hey there Black Static. Thanks for the questions!

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStatic View Post
    - presenting a professional image in the industry?
    I'm not sure what you mean by this question. Are you referring to how you can give yourself a professional image amongst peers and potential clients/employers? In that case I'd say it's really all about the 2 "P's": Be Postive and Be Prepared. I'll refer to a story with a client of mine.

    I did a 2-minute commercial for a mom and pop business that sells honey and honey products as wedding favors. When I first started talking to them to plan out the commercial, I came dressed in my company's polo shirt an khakis, with a beard but trimmed and tight, and I had a messenger bag with a small binder I started that was specifically devoted to this project. Inside I had a full layout of the expected costs, potential ideas for shots we'd use, and a short agreement I wrote up outlining certain things such as that once we came to an agreement that I would shoot the commercial they'd need to put a down payment on the service as well as that once we agreed that the commercial was done, I would not edit it further unless they were to pay me for editing and uploading the commercial again.

    They were surprised that I came so prepared and was very receptive to their questions, concerns, and suggestions. I remained positive the entire time and made them feel comfortable that me and my crew would do a great job at a reasonable price. And it came out great!

    The worst thing you can do in my business is be late or be unprepared or sour. Saying you can't or won't do something is usually a quick way to get yourself canned, or being combative in the creative process of a production can often lead to people feeling uncomfortable putting their brand in your hands. You need to be confident and willing to do the best job you can.

    - stepping up your game and losing that "newbiness" to your image?
    The short answer is to just do something. Make a show, short film, or music video. Build a demo reel, much like how an artist or writer would put together a portfolio of samples of their work. Go on You Tube and watch tutorials/how to videos and behind the scenes footage. FreddieW's company Rocket Jump is great at that by not only providing great entertainment on You Tube but also giving and inside look of how to do special effects or what goes on behind the scenes.

    Burnie Burns of Rooster Teeth I think said it best when people come up to him and say they want to work for Rooster Teeth or Achievement Hunter, he responds essentially with "prove it." Don't just say you want to do something, do it. If people wanted to make videos for Achievement Hunter then they should start uploading community videos and honing their craft. If they want to work for Rooster Teeth, start making shorts, get creative, and upload them to You Tube. You're not going to get experience and get a more "veteran" status by sitting around and waiting. You have to be active. Now I'm not going to lie to you and say that's easy. It helps to have a group of people who want to work with you and will take time out of their lives to work on something you believe in, and hopefully they believe in too. Don't put off improving yourself.

    - in the case of independent production, how would you go about collaboration with other/bigger companies?
    Well that's really all producing really. As I mentioned above, if you approach a company/location/band/etc. about collaborating on a project you should come prepared and be positive. Have a clear idea of what you want to do, how you're going to accomplish it, have an estimated timeline, and what the other guy will get out of providing their time/resources. Because most people won't do something for free, and frankly getting a credit doesn't put food on the table or a roof over one's head. If they happen to want to provide their services for just a credit, then great! But you should always expect that you're going to incur some cost, be it paying someone for services, buying a meal/catering, and in some cases transport.

    - crowd funding?.
    I'm not usually a fan of this primarily because most people who consider it don't have much experience in producing and what crowd funding means or how to work with a budget. With crowd funding you really do have to answer to a large potential group of people and usually have to provide incentives in order to get funding, including things like physical copies of a production and other miscellaneous swag which all costs money to create on their own, let alone actually funding the project itself.

    Not saying it can't work. Two fan productions called Grayson (Nightwing fan film) and Casey Jones (TMNT fan film) were crowd funded and came out. Both were of good quality and were successful in their own right. But these films were created by people with some decent experience in both production and producing and were able to craft a budget that worked. Now while this next example is not a film, there was recently a story of a guy who crowd funded a comic he created and didn't budget properly to where he was only able to send out about 75% of the physical comics he promised to backers. He then had a breakdown and threatened to film himself burning copies of his comic for every person who e-mailed him about when they'd get their comic and said something to the effect of people should fund him to live his life his way instead of funding him just to get a comic.

    In short, I wouldn't crowd fund unless you have a clear strategy and budget you're aiming for to cover not just the project but how you plan on rewarding your backers. Because while people shouldn't view sites like Kickstarter as a store, they often do and you risk undermining all your hard work due to logistical issues that will give you a very bad reputation.

    If you have any more questions please feel free to ask!

  9. #19
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    This was a huge motivational boost, thank you. Must admit, I teared up a little.

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    Quote Originally Posted by XoPachi View Post
    Kinda ties in with one of my first questions.
    In action flicks/shows, when we see explosions, buildings being ripped up, cars flipping down the road, and RPG's being fired, what's really going on to make those effects? It seems way more than just basic CGI...or maybe it is. 'u`
    Well it really depends on the particular effect you're talking about and what kind of budget a production is working with.

    Explosions can easily be done in CGI. But most medium-big budget films can afford a pyrotechnic who can set up certain controlled explosions to add a level of realism with practical effects.

    A lot of practical effects with buildings being blown up and cars flipping is usually done as miniatures. A studio like Industrial Light and Magic will build a replica of say New York City or Los Angeles and then blow it up extreme close-ups and wide-shots giving the feel that it's a big city but actually more the size of a big picnic table. A couple of examples of this would be the nukes blowing up LA in Terminator 2 and the alien motherships blowing up various cities in Independence Day.

    Other times when it comes to flipping cars they'll just forgo miniatures and flip an actual vehicle and fake buildings if it's a blockbuster. Terminator 3's much revered opening chase scene featuring a mobile crane was mostly done using practical effects and actually driving the crane through buildings.



    Much like how there's guns that fire blanks, there's also rocket launchers that appear to fire but actually fire nothing or just propel a dummy warhead.

    Nowadays people tend to rely on CG either because something costs too much to do it practically or it's a liability. Gone are the days where James Cameron would have a 18-wheeler spin out, then go on its side while it's dragged by several tractors down a roadway into a steel mill, all while a stuntman rides it like a surf board.

    But CG is usually a cheap and effective way for budding new producers to achieve a reasonably believable effect without breaking the bank or dealing with the financial burden of having to re-shoot something involving explosions, blood squibs (the small explosions you see on someone's body when they get shot and blood spews everywhere), and flipping cars. And while everyone would love to have limitless potential to do something crazy like the famous (and real) barrel roll from The Man With the Golden Gun, not everyone can afford to do multiple takes if something goes wrong or want to be held liable in case of injury.



    REPEAT: THIS IS REAL. NO SPECIAL EFFECTS.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStatic View Post
    This was a huge motivational boost, thank you. Must admit, I teared up a little.
    Haha, well I don't know if my words are worthy of tears, but I'm glad I could help.

 

 

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