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  Click here to go to the first staff post in this thread.   Thread: Job Hunting

  1. #1

    Job Hunting

    So this is it, I'm in the final stretch. It's my senior year in college, I have my own place, and I have bills to pay. It's time to get a real job. So… this is umm… where's that magical job tree I'm supposed to kick and have all the jobs just fall from the boughs?

    That's the thing, I've been trying to figure out how to get a job for the past 2 semesters and I can't even get pointed in the right direction. I'm almost done my B.S. in economics but I can't seem to figure out how to use the dang thing. What is the secret handshake for landing a position? So far, and depressingly, CE has been the most useful. I shall share their job wisdoms:

    - Job fairs are apparently the bees knees. You go to them and collect contacts. You then use those contacts to acquire more contacts, and then get the jobs. Unfortunately I couldn't attend the last career fair here :<

    - ALWAYS follow up. Phone calls, emails, whatever. Make sure you let them know you're not just another name in the pile of resumes.

    - Approach job hunting like it was a job. That is, plan to spend large portions of your day modifying cover letters, calling HR reps, and researching positions.

    - Don't take unpaid internships. Slavery was abolished a long time ago and they do nothing for resumes. This also cuts into your time for looking for a legit job.

    - If you have any family in the field ask for advice, even if you don't see each other very often.

    So yeah, job hunt discussion topic.
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  2. #2
    Senior Kurk2288's Avatar
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    The first 1 is obvious, but isn't said enough...

    -Keep your personal and online life separate. Employers & HR will Google your name and email, eventually.
    If your line of work requires an online identity. Keep it professional, avoid politics, and be careful dealing with online drama.

    -Change your resume, or portfolio to fit the position or company you're applying to.

    -If you're quitting your job, or chasing after another, leave on good terms.
    Give them at least a weeks notice, don't just up & leave. Resign politely if you can!
    Last edited by Kurk2288; 10-20-2014 at 07:51 PM.

  3. #3
    Regular Jim's Avatar
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    Be careful with the following up, actually. A lot of employers find that kind of annoying, and it's more of a bygone practice that's hit or miss depending on who's looking at the applications. I used to be on a hiring committee and most of the people in the committee found the repetitive calls from over-eager applicants to be off-putting, and almost made them seem full of themselves. If you apply or interview for a place and they say they'll call you "In a few days" and you've not heard from them in 3 days then yeah, follow-up. Otherwise, don't be a stalker about it.

    Also unpaid internships actually help. People like experience. Experience means that's less time (see: money) they have to spend getting you up to speed or training you. And also leaves less doubt in their mind as to whether or not you've got the chops to earn your paycheck, keep them in business, and keep them from getting sued. Also they're always going to hire someone with experience versus someone that's never actually applied themselves in the workplace (regardless of whether they got paid for it). Your degree is pretty meaningless without any experience to back up the knowledge. Be it volunteer work or internships.

    Like me for instance. First time I applied for ambulance work I got turned down because I had no experience. How does one get experience without a job? Volunteering (see: unpaid). Started volunteering with a rescue squad, then got hired for a local EMS company, yay.

    Also the job fair thing is pretty important. Regardless of what tips you hear, what strategies you're given, it really just comes down to who you know, and how lucky you are. If you don't know someone in the industry (as a reference, or as an employee/manager at a place you're applying) it's basically a matter of luck as to getting hired. If you know people and have positive experience with them, they're much more inclined to hire you or green-light your application. Especially if you have no relevant experience. It seems unsavory, but it's how stuff works, like it or not. You gotta know the right people to put in a good word for you. Good references are vital, and they need to be people from the industry you're looking to work in, or at least in a related field.

    Do be wary at job-fairs, though. People are there recruiting because they obviously need to hire people to keep things going. They're definitely going to sugar-coat stuff and make their company, service, or whatever seem like your dream come true. Always read the fine print when people are actually coming to YOU to give you money. I've had a few friends eagerly apply to places from job-fairs to find out the cute pamphlets and stuff were near (or blatant) lies to ring in unsuspecting grads.

  4. #4
    Solifugid Onnes's Avatar
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    Your department and/or college should have more than a few resources for making sure their graduates find employment, because unemployed or underemployed graduates reflect poorly on the institution. If these things do not exist, be very, very afraid, for this means that either no one cares or you're dealing with a state of institutional undeath where caring is no longer even possible.

  5. #5
    Also unpaid internships actually help. People like experience. Experience means that's less time (see: money) they have to spend getting you up to speed or training you. And also leaves less doubt in their mind as to whether or not you've got the chops to earn your paycheck, keep them in business, and keep them from getting sued. Also they're always going to hire someone with experience versus someone that's never actually applied themselves in the workplace (regardless of whether they got paid for it). Your degree is pretty meaningless without any experience to back up the knowledge. Be it volunteer work or internships.

    Like me for instance. First time I applied for ambulance work I got turned down because I had no experience. How does one get experience without a job? Volunteering (see: unpaid). Started volunteering with a rescue squad, then got hired for a local EMS company, yay.
    You're wrong.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/business/...udents/276959/

    Like, demonstrably so.
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  6. #6
    Regular Jim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeenageAngst View Post
    Hm, well that's weird O: I guess my anecdote and perceptions are just part of a localized fluke/happenstance. Also I guess I'm just biased personally to like people with experience over inexperienced applicants. :s

    So unpaid internships don't help much, but paid internships do considerably!~ I lern'd a thing today. :3

    I guess go for the paying internships then! I figured having any kind of job-related experience would help, apparently outside of emergency medical care in the southeast it only helps if you get paid for it! :x You got me there!

  7. #7
    Well a paid internship is also called a "job", usually contract work fluffed up as an internship that may or may not lead to a permanent position.
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  8. #8
    Regular Jim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeenageAngst View Post
    Well a paid internship is also called a "job", usually contract work fluffed up as an internship that may or may not lead to a permanent position.
    Well yeah, that's true I suppose. I always felt they were more of a learning/experience opportunity than an entry-level job, though. But the more I think about it the more I realize that's exactly what they are.

    While unpaid internships are really just fluffed-up volunteering opportunities I guess?

    That said maybe my view is a bit different than most. When I was getting my original degree our internships were mandatory and required to graduate, and were more for near-graduation job experience and an opportunity to practice what we'd learned. From what I'm gathering apparently they're not always mandatory and don't always serve the same function? In the health field they are an essential part of your degree. And to be honest I've kind of been in a health-field bubble all these years, so I'm super ignorant about things from other fields.

  9. #9
    In the social sciences fields if they tried to make internships mandatory it would glut the system. Then again idk if economics really deserves to be considered a social science since unlike everyone else in the college of humanities and social sciences we need to learn statistics, use statistical software, take two semesters of calculus, learn experimental design, and actually throw our hat in the ring with original research. Pretty much every stereotype about the joke social science majors goes out the window when you start talking about kurtosis and bootstrapping.

    Onnes has a good point, it makes the college look bad if I don't get a jerb. I'll try and harass my advisor next week about this issue, thus far I've only spoken to the career services peoples.
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  10.   This is the last staff post in this thread.   #10
    Retired Staff piñardilla's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Well yeah, that's true I suppose. I always felt they were more of a learning/experience opportunity than an entry-level job, though. But the more I think about it the more I realize that's exactly what they are.

    While unpaid internships are really just fluffed-up volunteering opportunities I guess?
    Unpaid internships are slave contracts to do menial tasks such as data entry masquerading as valuable learning opportunities. They ought to be abolished and workers should refuse to tolerate them, but unfortunately the state of organized labor in today's world isn't strong enough to end the practice.
         
       
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    blue skies.

 

 

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