Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Junior Itzal's Avatar
    Weasyl
    RealitysLabRat
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    In Denial
    Gender
    Meow
    Posts
    7

    Script Writing for Comics

    I've wanted to get into comic making for a while now, and I have ideas for the setting, character bios and designs, and a general premise of the story. However, when it comes to putting all that into a script format, lost doesn't even begin to describe how I feel.

    I understand that this is a needed thing if I don't want my comic to become a directionlessness mess, but I'm more than confused as to how I address it. Does anyone have a few tips to pass on? Your help is much appreciated!

  2. #2
    I found out the hard way that some sort of outline is essential. Just knowing you have x number of pages to tell your story will shape the kind of story you want to tell, and how you want to tell it. Read other comics, and study how they tell their stories. Movies and television are also rich sources of information on how to tell stories in a visual medium.

  3. #3
    Junior Itzal's Avatar
    Weasyl
    RealitysLabRat
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    In Denial
    Gender
    Meow
    Posts
    7
    Thanks! I've started to look at those kinds of medium in an objective manner, and I've already began to note a few things, namely on staging and body language/tones expressing a moment. However, I didn't think that it would also assist in helping me finally write this thing out.

  4. #4
    Senior Vae's Avatar
    Weasyl
    Vae
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    the sky
    Gender
    Ludwig Von Koopa
    Posts
    1,697
    Write out your most important plot details. Don't keep them in your head. Write them down. Make an actual timeline of events for your story progression. Keep these notes for your own personal reference.
    This will help you avoid conflicting your own material, and creating glaring plot holes, or writing yourself into a corner.

    When you feel like your story is solid enough that you thoroughly know how it's going to progress, start making [thumbnails].
    Make a decent chunk before you begin any final draft work.
    This will help you make sure your pacing and flow stand up well, as well as help you figure out the format your comic pages should follow, to best tell your story. Fitting in dialogue, all that fun junk.
    If you have the option, have someone look over your thumbs, to make sure things look good and aren't confusing.

    After that, then you can worry about final draft pages.
    Resident Koopa Trash

  5. #5
    People who have a "general idea of a story" are usually just that, idea men. Write the story first, then put pictures to it. This will also allow you to condense the story using the visual medium, that is, tell pieces of the story through framing and other visual cues rather than relying entirely on prose and dialog. Because you'll already know ahead of time where you're going with it and where you need to be.

    It will also allow you to look at the story in isolation from the artwork and help you determine if you're bad at writing or not.
    Get a loada this guy here.
    https://twitter.com/DogdongD

  6. #6
    Junior batbot's Avatar
    Weasyl
    hareteeth
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Gender
    hate
    Posts
    28
    scripting is individual for each writer or artist.
    sometimes, just writing everything in novel format works, other people work best off a script like a play or TV show, some people want panel-to-panel breakdowns, others just want a very rough outline of each chapter with highlights and key notes. Some people skip writing out a script and go straight to thumbnails. Each has it's pros and cons, no one method is "better" than the others, that is to say, no one method will make your comic better by using it. (Some will obviously be better for the people your working with, or yourself, to follow)

    • You might want to start at an outline of the plot, what are the major events that happen to lead to the resolution? (IS there a resolution is a good question, too! A lot of webcomics and series go on indefinitely, and it's best to figure out if there is an endgame to your story now, so you can build to it, or if you want to do a few story arcs in this setting with these characters, creating new situations until you decide to end the story.)
    • Decide that each major event or story is "one chapter", then keep going finer and finer. What are the essential situations that establish the event, how do they feed into the overall direction of the story? What subplots are relevant to be introduced, what do these situations reveal about the characters?
    • How many pages do you need to tell the story in each chapter? I'd go for something between 16-24. Pick up the kind of comic you're going for, something similar in genre, storytelling, or art style. It's probably already the kind of comic you like to read, and count the pages in an average chapter. Look at important, special, multi-part chapters, too; it's all relevant, count the pages, and use that as your benchmark.
    • Then it's just a matter of pacing your situations out on each page. The amount of pages you give yourself to work with will effect the pacing of each page, which will overall become the rhythm of the narrative and most effect the interpretation of your genre.



    My honest opinion is to shelve whatever story you've been cooking, and make a handful of short narrative comics (1 chapter at most) to get a feel for your process and what works best for you.
    -----

    For me, personally, writing is such a huge hang-up that I go straight to thumbnails, adding dialogue right over the panel (or I forget what panel it goes to often), with just a general idea of the plot and a strict marriage to page count.
    For me it keeps the intensity of the story going, keeps be super-mindful of how much space I have to insert text, and is less of a waste of time because I enjoy the drawing more than the writing. It also nips awkward, dorky lines in the bud, because I end up staring at a line as I refine the thumbnail, in a way I wouldn't do until I was lettering when I kept the writing and the art separate. Another plus is that going to thumbs directly means I immediately start thinking about how the panels will look on a page, and knocking out the layout. I HATE layout, trying to make interesting panels when I have a script is horrible, drawing all the bleeds and boxes is like pulling teeth. Drawing a panel at no bigger that half-page size and filling it in is a walk in the park.

    The cons of my method are that it's more labour intensive, especially for editing, and it can get messy. It's hard for people to judge on your thumbs if your layout is good, so you totally end up doing a full-size pencil page before you realize it looks horrible. I often get stuck or stop if I have to sketch something I don't quite know how to draw (boats and ships being the most common hang up! Why am I putting boats and ships into everything!?) I'm more reluctant to scrap an image than a line, too. But the overall fact that I enjoy what I'm doing, at the initial steps, negates the cons for me, or else I'd seriously never do comics.
    apathetic.

  7. #7
    Junior brebisdeslis's Avatar
    Weasyl
    brebisdeslis
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    6
    Really good break down of different methods. I've always kind of "known" them as EC, Marvel and Manga method.
    There is a book called Words for Pictures: The Art and Business of Writing Comics and Graphic Novels by Brian Bendis. I've only read a couple excepts but it's nice because it has advice along with actual scripts that were used for comics.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •