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Claine
07-12-2015, 09:09 AM
I started listening to audiobooks to motivate me to study art. I always got so frustrated with gesture studies etc that I was so unreliable to do them. So I started to listen to audiobooks, and I can't listen if I'm not drawing. That way, if I want to continue the story I MUST be studying!

Sooo I'm always on the lookout for new books! Who here likes reading, and what god books have you read recently?

TeenageAngst
07-12-2015, 09:36 AM
>reading
>audiobooks

Pick one.

Claine
07-12-2015, 10:00 AM
Pick one? Why not both :)

PlayPossum
07-12-2015, 12:41 PM
I always had trouble listening to music while doing anything else (like chatting, studying, reading) because I wouldn't be able to concentrate on both and the music would just pass by me without being noticed.
Recently I developed multitasking enough so I can listen to music while drawing, but only with music that I'm already familiar with. New stuff gotta be listened separately else I won't "absorb" it.

But I find your idea really nice, to be honest! Good usage of time.
My problem with audiobooks is that if I miss any word, I get really uneasy.

BUT BUT, I will just add 2 cents by Richard Williams here on this topic:
http://i.imgur.com/8qUcapq.jpg

There is a bit of a double-edge to this subject:

Yes, listening to stuff while working/studying might compromise the quality of it, specially if you are STUDYING, because you gotta focus on the subject if you want to actually learn it.

On the other hand, it's better to listen to audiobooks and draw than not listen to audiobooks and NOT draw. If it gives you motivation to go on, I say keep doing it! Specially if what you're working in presents no new challenges and is your usual workflow.

On the recommendations, I haven't read in a good, goooooood while, because Internet.
But I remember Jules Verne as quite the nice reading, so I'll toss here Around the World in 80 Days and 20.000 Leagues Under the Sea.

Claine
07-12-2015, 09:06 PM
I've actually listened to the audio version of Around the World in 80 days! I should definitely add 20000 Leagues Under the Sea to my list.

When I started listening to Audiobooks while drawing, I was worried that I would get so engrossed in my art that I would faze out of the audio, but I found that wasn't the case. However, drawing and listening does definitely take up 100% of my concentration, and if somebody talks to me I can't even register words before muting the book.

Friday
07-19-2015, 12:38 AM
I personally love audiobooks! I'm not sure I how I feel about listening to them while working on art. However, I originally started listening to audiobooks a few years ago because I had to drive a series of long road trips, and I needed something to keep my interest and focus from dwindling from boredom.
I started with the Harry Potter series, since I never managed to finish it as a kid. I'm now listening to various Sherlock Holmes stories :3

If you need a site where there are lots of good quality audiobooks for free, I'd reccomend https://librivox.org/ (https://librivox.org/)

PlayPossum
07-24-2015, 05:53 PM
If you need a site where there are lots of good quality audiobooks for free, I'd reccomend https://librivox.org/ (https://librivox.org/)
Nice! Might use this for some language practice as well.

CA3
07-25-2015, 08:32 AM
Here's the current reading list. Some I've read before, others I'm re-reading again, and a few are about to be read soon. Never had a problem with audiobooks myself, but I've never been one to multi-task. I'm a one thing at a time sort of guy, so I can understand that animator guy's point.

Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud
Making Comics by Scott McCloud
The Black Man's Guide Out of Poverty by Aaron Clarey
Bachelor Pad Economics by Aaron Clarey
Worthless by Aaron Clarey
Enjoy the Decline by Aaron Clarey
The Beginner's Book of Meditation by Attila Orosz
How to Keep a Sketchbook Journal by Claudia Nice
The Art of Bioshock Infinite by Julian Murdoch & Various
The Art of Remember Me by Aleksi Briclot & Various
You Might Remember Me by Mike Thomas

SailorX2
08-06-2015, 03:26 PM
I'm a classic lit kinda person, and I just finished reading Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, and it's now one of my all-time favorites.

I'm not really a fan of audiobooks in general unless it's either a voice I really love or something that was meant to be heard with your ears rather than seen with the eyes, like poetry. And I could never get anything out of them (or at least the types of things I'd go for, since I don't have this problem with podcasts like WTNV) if I was studying. The two conflicting sets of words I'd process would cause problems and I'd likely switch them around or something, making everything take longer. Plus I'm one of those readers that really likes to "chew" on words, so to speak.

Video game music, on the other hand, is a completely different ballpark.
I mean it was designed to engage the listener.

OhSynapse
08-06-2015, 06:31 PM
Video game music, on the other hand, is a completely different ballpark.
I mean it was designed to engage the listener.

Just make sure it isn't Ragnarok Online music or else you'll glance at the clock and OH CRUD it's 4 am.

SailorX2
08-07-2015, 10:48 AM
Just make sure it isn't Ragnarok Online music or else you'll glance at the clock and OH CRUD it's 4 am.

I even have two playlists, one called "World Map" for regular homework and "BOSS BATTLE!!!!!!" for when it's 4am and I've got to finish a research paper or something. The duel theme choral rock stuff from the anime Revolutionary Girl Utena is perfect for that, actually...

OhSynapse
08-07-2015, 04:28 PM
I even have two playlists, one called "World Map" for regular homework and "BOSS BATTLE!!!!!!" for when it's 4am and I've got to finish a research paper or something. The duel theme choral rock stuff from the anime Revolutionary Girl Utena is perfect for that, actually...

http://www.rpgamers.net/radio/

You might be interested in bookmarking this site, then-- they livestream video game music and you can make requests. It really helps when you want to hunker down and finish a piece.

Claine
08-08-2015, 10:17 PM
I changed the title of this thread to make it more relevant to the topic that spawned.

Nope seems I just changed the topic of my post.

SailorX2
08-09-2015, 11:50 AM
I changed the title of this thread to make it more relevant to the topic that spawned.

Nope seems I just changed the topic of my post.

Oops, sorry dear.
I could try to shift it back by mentioning I'm currently reading The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath...

sayum
08-29-2015, 04:49 AM
*casually shifts back to the topic of audiobooks*
As much as I love reading (and hugging and smelling) books, I find that there are just some situations its not appropriate to have your nose between pages. Like on the freeway.

All of the Harry Potter books have excellent audio versions. As for other book suggestions, mine are: The Redwall Series (First Book: Redwall) and The Bartimaeus Trilogy (First Book: The Amulet of Samarkand).

Redwall is cute and exciting. Lots of mice and hares and otters. Ah, the books from my childhood.

Bartimaeus is about magic and has great characters. I was hooked in the first few minutes of the audiobooks.

maugryph
08-29-2015, 11:30 PM
I love books but the majority that I have are non fiction: drawing books, history, animals, plants, biographies. that sort of thing. As for audiobooks I had an 1 hour commute, I would listen to the Harry Potter books while driving to and from work.

Pignog
09-09-2015, 03:47 AM
Does anyone here use GoodReads? I find it's great for organizing my reading, books I've read, what I plan on reading. If you do feel free to add me:

https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1089180-chris-jones

As far as great books, I've got a few to recommend from the last year:

Nausicaa of the Valley of Wind

Awesome manga written by Hayao Miyazaki over about ten years. If you love any of the Ghibli films like Princess Mononoke, you should definitely check out this series. The series takes place in the far future after an apocalyptic war known as "The Seven Days of Fire" wiped out most of humanity. A forest full of giant insects and poisonous air is slowly creeping across the planet while the remaining human nations fight over a few scraps of land and scarce resources. The series follows a young princess caught in the middle of it all, trying to put an end to the war. It's one of my favorite pieces of fiction.

The Guns of August

This is a classic history text written in the 1960s on the outbreak of the First World War. It does a great job of examining the immediate causes of the war and the big personalities involved. Even if you don't like big history texts, Barbara Tuchman's writing is so engaging that it reads like a novel. The book covers the German invasion of Belgium and France, as well as the Battle of Tannenberg in the east. You'll get the perspectives of the great power's statesmen and generals. It's a textbook case in why "plans never survive first contact with the enemy."

Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis

A great book on social class in the United States, but the issues are relevant to many developed countries. Its thesis is that social and economic inequality are on the rise in America, and makes comparisons between the 1950s and the present. It also goes beyond this, explaining exactly why this is happening, and why opportunities for individuals in the poorest class are disappearing. Putnam draws on a variety of statistics and over 100 interviews conducted with individuals across classes.