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Moogle
06-17-2015, 02:25 AM
I've had this on my mind since earlier today and am a bit ticked that I can't seem to understand which would be the better option.. so I thought I'd get your guys view on this. :)

Should anyone risk lying to the company you could potentially work for just so they hear what they want to hear, or be respectfully truthful even if it means having a chance to backfire? To be clear, I don't mean lying on a resume or application, rather a little questionnaire that some companies do which claim have no "right or wrong" answer (though I'm sure it plays a role in hiring). I took one today after submitting in my resume since it's mandatory and the only way they'd consider accepting it. Honestly it's a neat idea, I'm all for them doing this especially if there's no incorrect answers.. however I can't shake the feeling that it'll determine whether I get a call back or not (given that I was quite truthful all the way through, I'm having my doubts now). To give an example, one of the questions went something like this:

"You're a new employee who happens to walk by a senior worker arguing with a customer, what do you do?"

It was multiple choice and only had 4 given answers, I knew which was probably the correct one but I answered what I'd personally do in that situation; continue on towards my work station and let someone else more capable handle it. I guess it's worth mentioning that I applied for overnight shifts so there'd be no customers, but that most likely won't save my butt.

Anyone else ever run into this, or do you think it's not all that important to stress over?

Hewge
06-17-2015, 03:28 AM
DON'T STRESS, BECK. Honesty is the best policy!
Even if lying can help get you what you want sometimes, if you know what I mean... wait.

Hakuna matata, Moogleh~

Antumbra
06-17-2015, 09:09 AM
I don't think it is bad to stretch the truth on the questionnaires. They most likely are screening you for the job. Really though they are to weed out people who put "yes it is ok to steal from my employer" and such

If it also makes you feel better, I think allowing true senior person to handle it is the correct answer.

DrunkCat
06-17-2015, 11:33 AM
I knew which was probably the correct one but I answered what I'd personally do in that situation

And that in the end was the correct choice. Unless you know for a fact that it's the "correct answer" it's best to be honest and go with your gut feeling.

piñardilla
06-17-2015, 05:27 PM
For behavioral interview questions, go with the most responsible and ass-kissing answer possible, which in this case was probably politely getting involved and offering to escalate the root problem to the shift manager. Those questions only exist to weed you out, no sense in just letting them.

Moogle
06-17-2015, 06:28 PM
DON'T STRESS, BECK. Honesty is the best policy!
Even if lying can help get you what you want sometimes, if you know what I mean... wait.

Hakuna matata, Moogleh~

Much encouragement, I needed this! -hugs- I do think honesty is the way to go (& sometimes I've found being truthful in the long run to actually benefit myself and others more), I just don't know if that'll be the case for this situation. I'm half tempted to go down to the place and beg for the position, 'course that'd most likely worsen my chances even more. Can't afford to screw this up. D;

-replays Hakuna Matata constantly- Thanks Hewgeh xD


I don't think it is bad to stretch the truth on the questionnaires. They most likely are screening you for the job. Really though they are to weed out people who put "yes it is ok to steal from my employer" and such

If it also makes you feel better, I think allowing true senior person to handle it is the correct answer.

I really hope it's more for those types of people, but I doubt anyone would openly say they'd steal (along with other really terrible stuff) so it almost seems pointless. Unless they're super honest thieves, ofc! :P


And that in the end was the correct choice. Unless you know for a fact that it's the "correct answer" it's best to be honest and go with your gut feeling.

The answer I thought was correct was to inform the supervisor (but every question had that one, so I thought it was more a trick for those who aren't independent than anything). I dislike confrontation, so the majority of my answers catered towards a more passive response so I can only hope they don't mind.

Really appreciate your thoughts guys! And am thankful a bit that you think I chose correctly, guess only time will tell if I get the spot. :3

@Pina That's what I was afraid of, and I really don't want to take that route incase they judge how I work and realize I'm not following through with what I answered. That actually was one of the answers too, though I didn't think it'd be correct. Oh man I'm so boned..

(gotta rush bk to dinner, so bad at multitaskin T_T)

Zeitzbach
06-18-2015, 12:13 AM
Honesty is the tool to getting hired.

Don't lie. Instead. Over exaggerate and advertise yourself if can which will likely happen in an interview part.

But in the multiple choice part, most of the choices are really correct, just some are "more correct" and you really will have to go with that tbh.

Is there any kind of "Get help for your senior" in the choices beside just walking away? Because picking the "butting in" isn't really something a new employee should be doing as it can backfire but getting someone to help your senior instead of just waiting for someone else would be the best answer around.

piñardilla
06-18-2015, 02:23 AM
The answer I thought was correct was to inform the supervisor (but every question had that one, so I thought it was more a trick for those who aren't independent than anything). I dislike confrontation, so the majority of my answers catered towards a more passive response so I can only hope they don't mind.

Really appreciate your thoughts guys! And am thankful a bit that you think I chose correctly, guess only time will tell if I get the spot. :3

@Pina That's what I was afraid of, and I really don't want to take that route incase they judge how I work and realize I'm not following through with what I answered. That actually was one of the answers too, though I didn't think it'd be correct. Oh man I'm so boned..

There might be a few questions where the point is to see if you can do the basic tasks of your job without pestering management, but honestly "inform the supervisor" is going to be the correct answer a lot of the time, especially for anything involving conflict or co-worker misconduct.

Management really isn't going to remember your responses even a month after you're hired. They're there for screening purposes, nothing more. They do know what the expectations of the job are though, which is what the "correct" answers reflect, so that's the standard you'll be held to no matter what you answer. Honesty doesn't really score you any points, all they care about is that you do the job the way they want you to because they've determined that's how they make the most money.

I wouldn't necessarily say you're boned yet. My own experience with these was from my first job ever, which was at a Wal-Mart. I overthought a few questions on the application and gave some "wrong" answers. They later became interview questions as a result, the hiring manager literally went down a print-off of the questions and asked me to explain anything that wasn't "correct". I answered well enough to still get the job.

But... I assume this was an electronic application? The dirty little secret behind mandatory e-apps is that it's not about going paperless or green or any such thing. It's so the computer can pre-screen applicants for the hiring manager. When you click "Submit", the computer checks your application against its internal criteria, and if you don't meet its minimum standards then it just silently deletes it, never to be seen by an actual human. Honesty really doesn't pay off with those.

I say basically, if it can't be proven objectively false later (education, work history, etc.), kiss as much ass as possible (though at the same time, try not to sound like a kiss-ass in person). They don't really care about you beyond the job, and you don't owe them honesty or anything really beyond the perfunctory duties of the job should you be hired.

Rilvor
06-18-2015, 03:06 AM
What Pinar is saying is true. What you need to understand about corporate world is that it's all a song and dance you're expected to follow. Everyone knows that's not true, everyone knows that policy is bullshit, everyone knows this that and the other but at the end of the day you wear the mask just like everyone else.

Basically it's all a big joke and everyone's in on it.

Moogle
06-19-2015, 02:54 AM
Honesty is the tool to getting hired.

Don't lie. Instead. Over exaggerate and advertise yourself if can which will likely happen in an interview part.

But in the multiple choice part, most of the choices are really correct, just some are "more correct" and you really will have to go with that tbh.

Is there any kind of "Get help for your senior" in the choices beside just walking away? Because picking the "butting in" isn't really something a new employee should be doing as it can backfire but getting someone to help your senior instead of just waiting for someone else would be the best answer around.

I totally agree with ya Zeitz on exaggerating and being outgoing in the interview part (good first impression and all), although I'm not great at pulling such an act off so hopefully they won't judge me on my performance too much.

There was a 'get/inform your supervisor' choice in almost all the questions, and it looked to be the correct answer in numerous ones. I think out of the whole questionnaire I picked it only twice.


There might be a few questions where the point is to see if you can do the basic tasks of your job without pestering management, but honestly "inform the supervisor" is going to be the correct answer a lot of the time, especially for anything involving conflict or co-worker misconduct.

Management really isn't going to remember your responses even a month after you're hired. They're there for screening purposes, nothing more. They do know what the expectations of the job are though, which is what the "correct" answers reflect, so that's the standard you'll be held to no matter what you answer. Honesty doesn't really score you any points, all they care about is that you do the job the way they want you to because they've determined that's how they make the most money.

I wouldn't necessarily say you're boned yet. My own experience with these was from my first job ever, which was at a Wal-Mart. I overthought a few questions on the application and gave some "wrong" answers. They later became interview questions as a result, the hiring manager literally went down a print-off of the questions and asked me to explain anything that wasn't "correct". I answered well enough to still get the job.

But... I assume this was an electronic application? The dirty little secret behind mandatory e-apps is that it's not about going paperless or green or any such thing. It's so the computer can pre-screen applicants for the hiring manager. When you click "Submit", the computer checks your application against its internal criteria, and if you don't meet its minimum standards then it just silently deletes it, never to be seen by an actual human. Honesty really doesn't pay off with those.

I say basically, if it can't be proven objectively false later (education, work history, etc.), kiss as much ass as possible (though at the same time, try not to sound like a kiss-ass in person). They don't really care about you beyond the job, and you don't owe them honesty or anything really beyond the perfunctory duties of the job should you be hired.

Gosh.. thank you so much Pina for explaining all this and not beating around the bush. Figured I was a bit naive when it came to employment related stuff but not to this extent. I'm actually not too sure what to even say about how dirty a majority of these companies are if their mindsets are like this, and regarding the questionnaire (it was online).. that's just brutal. ;x

I'm keeping a bit of hope however after hearing about your experience with Walmart. That said though, as much as I'd love to wait for these guys to contact me back.. I guess it wouldn't be smart to bank everything on just this. But at least I know how they operate better now, and while I still don't fully agree on lying to them I'll be a bit more flexible with my answers if I run into anymore online applications.


What Pinar is saying is true. What you need to understand about corporate world is that it's all a song and dance you're expected to follow. Everyone knows that's not true, everyone knows that policy is bullshit, everyone knows this that and the other but at the end of the day you wear the mask just like everyone else.

Basically it's all a big joke and everyone's in on it.

It's sad to see it explained like this, although I'm wondering if it's different in other places of the world? Maybe the US works like that but Canada not so much, course that might just be wishful thinking.

Rilvor
06-19-2015, 04:18 AM
It's just human social behavior. It's strange I know, but those who learn the way it works are the ones leading the dance.

piñardilla
06-19-2015, 05:42 AM
Gosh.. thank you so much Pina for explaining all this and not beating around the bush. Figured I was a bit naive when it came to employment related stuff but not to this extent. I'm actually not too sure what to even say about how dirty a majority of these companies are if their mindsets are like this, and regarding the questionnaire (it was online).. that's just brutal. ;x

I'm keeping a bit of hope however after hearing about your experience with Walmart. That said though, as much as I'd love to wait for these guys to contact me back.. I guess it wouldn't be smart to bank everything on just this. But at least I know how they operate better now, and while I still don't fully agree on lying to them I'll be a bit more flexible with my answers if I run into anymore online applications.

I'm sorry the world's not as nice a place as it ought to be. I'd hate to see a positive, honest and friendly attitude like yours give way to cynicism like mine, but unfortunately it's kind of a necessary adaptation to survive out there. :(

But yes, don't bank on this application, start looking for more now. In fact, don't even do them one at a time at all. Find all the places you'd like to work and apply to all of them. If while waiting to hear back from your first choice you get a job offer from a second-tier choice, take it without hesitation. Then if your first choice comes through later with an offer, take it and quit the other job and don't feel bad about it. There's nothing wrong with leaving for a better job, it's expected behavior in actual career jobs. People will often use competing job offers as leverage for a raise, even.


It's sad to see it explained like this, although I'm wondering if it's different in other places of the world? Maybe the US works like that but Canada not so much, course that might just be wishful thinking.

Can't say I've had experience with Canada, but I think it's a capitalism thing, not a regional thing. You can't really escape it.

Noxid
06-19-2015, 10:32 AM
as an OFFICIAL 🍁 CANADIAN, I can confirm that it's pretty much the same deal. When you apply for a megacorp like that, they don't really care who you are, they just want to cull as many applications as fast as possible. It's just too much work and the resources to do it manually are expensive.

Moogle
06-20-2015, 03:12 AM
But yes, don't bank on this application, start looking for more now. In fact, don't even do them one at a time at all. Find all the places you'd like to work and apply to all of them. If while waiting to hear back from your first choice you get a job offer from a second-tier choice, take it without hesitation. Then if your first choice comes through later with an offer, take it and quit the other job and don't feel bad about it. There's nothing wrong with leaving for a better job, it's expected behavior in actual career jobs. People will often use competing job offers as leverage for a raise, even.

Such valuable info, thank you once again (& to everyone actually for your multiple viewpoints on this! :o). I've even passed this knowledge onto my brother (whos in the same situation as me), he's quite happy to know this since he's more willing to bend the truth without feeling too down about it. Time to send out a butt-ton of resumes tomorrow! :thumbsup:

Oly
06-20-2015, 06:12 AM
I've always thought of jobs and business as an exercise in willful, controlled 'sociopathy' for lack of a better word. With regards to the politics of it, expectations of form and ceremony, that angle of it, not the actual doing work part. It's just always felt like to succeed in business, especially working a highly corporate job, you have to try and detach from giving a shit about things like other people, whatever ethics you might hold, how you want to live your life.

Maybe it's partly just cuz I got very little patience left in me for playing along with shit like that though. It's more foreign to me than to someone who is more inclined to be happy with status quo, i suppose. I'm a perpetually discontent punk. so. :U

PlayPossum
07-07-2015, 02:45 PM
I love how meta job interviews are! :laugh:

I mean, they make all these cookie-cutter formulas for telling people apart, but people who could possibly be filtered by the questions are all well-aware of the process and will make sure to "stay in line" during questionnaires, rendering all the spectacle rather useless.
Except for filtering the extreme lunatics or clueless folks.

I believe it's mostly kept as a process because questionnaires themselves became a market and Human Resources departments make enterprises believe it's a good idea, even when that isn't the case.

Well, as Rivor said about the dancing stuff, this kind of application DOES play a role in establishing an unspoken contract: by lying to fit the desired answers, you are sending a message that you understand that those are the desired behavior norms, independently of whether you agree with (or intend to follow) them or not.

All-in-all I find this a stupid system. If you are applying for a stupid boss (most enterprises really), go along with it, as the HR will just follow a ready-made selection process on you.
But if you are aiming at some kind of enterprise that somehow looks differently at their employees (like I don't now, Google, Pixar for instance), you might want to be more honest, or at least not so cliché.

There are even formulas like answering questions such as "What are your biggest flaws?" with pseudo-flaws, like "I'm too perfectionist", or "I don't stop working until I'm done", "I worry too much about my job", this is super-duper cliché and makes me want to punch a baby.

It doesn't end here! As this system gets old, many HR crews will probably start to look at ass-kissing patterns and deem the candidates as probable liars, and when this becomes a trend, people will start to regulate their "right/wrong" ratio and a whole new metagame will sprout around "being right, but not enough to raise suspicion".

Amusing and surreal stuff.

piñardilla
07-08-2015, 03:48 AM
I love how meta job interviews are! :laugh:

I mean, they make all these cookie-cutter formulas for telling people apart, but people who could possibly be filtered by the questions are all well-aware of the process and will make sure to "stay in line" during questionnaires, rendering all the spectacle rather useless.
Except for filtering the extreme lunatics or clueless folks.

I believe it's mostly kept as a process because questionnaires themselves became a market and Human Resources departments make enterprises believe it's a good idea, even when that isn't the case.

Well, as Rivor said about the dancing stuff, this kind of application DOES play a role in establishing an unspoken contract: by lying to fit the desired answers, you are sending a message that you understand that those are the desired behavior norms, independently of whether you agree with (or intend to follow) them or not.

All-in-all I find this a stupid system. If you are applying for a stupid boss (most enterprises really), go along with it, as the HR will just follow a ready-made selection process on you.
But if you are aiming at some kind of enterprise that somehow looks differently at their employees (like I don't now, Google, Pixar for instance), you might want to be more honest, or at least not so cliché.

There are even formulas like answering questions such as "What are your biggest flaws?" with pseudo-flaws, like "I'm too perfectionist", or "I don't stop working until I'm done", "I worry too much about my job", this is super-duper cliché and makes me want to punch a baby.

It doesn't end here! As this system gets old, many HR crews will probably start to look at ass-kissing patterns and deem the candidates as probable liars, and when this becomes a trend, people will start to regulate their "right/wrong" ratio and a whole new metagame will sprout around "being right, but not enough to raise suspicion".

Amusing and surreal stuff.

Yeah, it's kind of an arms race in bullshitting skill. I even have a few programmed "slightly too blunt" responses to establish myself as a straight shooter in an interview and get the interviewer to drop their BS filters.

"So, why do you want to work for Foocorp?"
"Oh, because I want money, mostly. But what brought me to apply here specifically is..."

WolfNightV4X1
08-21-2015, 09:46 AM
...leaving out pertinent information landed me a job.

I was worried if I'd said I got fired from my last job it would reflect on my work ethic even if I explained the incident that made such a thing happened (I'd been on that job for a year and -that- happened, they kicked another employee as well as me)

Instead...I said I was looking for another job because I didnt have enough hours in the last, which is true, and I had left said job because of 'personal issues'.

So after I got hired I'd worked as much as I could to keep it...still am, it's been three months thus far and Im not tolerating my own mistakes this time!

...as for quesstionnaires I hate those and have no idea what they accomplish. Seems like I should tell them what they want to hear, like how they ask "Does working in a group environment make you feel accomplished?" "Do you enjoy talking to customers?" "Rate how much you enjoy working with others in a team-based environment" "What would you do if...(insert obvious choice here and some bad choices). I mean, nobody wants to hear that Im quite socially inept and have to work on my traits and keep waving and smiling, so I put what they want to hear, it feels like I'd be discarded if I didnt qualify for the job.

In the end I "Fake it until I make it", exude confidence and know you can do it more than you really can and be willing to learn it as you go once you're on. It doesn't seem like they hire people who openly admit to being clueless and unsure.

jeythehusky
08-21-2015, 01:32 PM
don't lie, just leave out information, and if the employer wanted to know, they'll ask.

put in stuff you want them to know, and leave stuff out you don't want them to know. but if they ask, just answer honestly, and play up your strengths. lying is a big no no.

Shanwang
08-21-2015, 08:18 PM
I've had this on my mind since earlier today and am a bit ticked that I can't seem to understand which would be the better option.. so I thought I'd get your guys view on this. :)

Should anyone risk lying to the company you could potentially work for just so they hear what they want to hear, or be respectfully truthful even if it means having a chance to backfire? To be clear, I don't mean lying on a resume or application, rather a little questionnaire that some companies do which claim have no "right or wrong" answer (though I'm sure it plays a role in hiring). I took one today after submitting in my resume since it's mandatory and the only way they'd consider accepting it. Honestly it's a neat idea, I'm all for them doing this especially if there's no incorrect answers.. however I can't shake the feeling that it'll determine whether I get a call back or not (given that I was quite truthful all the way through, I'm having my doubts now). To give an example, one of the questions went something like this:

"You're a new employee who happens to walk by a senior worker arguing with a customer, what do you do?"

It was multiple choice and only had 4 given answers, I knew which was probably the correct one but I answered what I'd personally do in that situation; continue on towards my work station and let someone else more capable handle it. I guess it's worth mentioning that I applied for overnight shifts so there'd be no customers, but that most likely won't save my butt.

Anyone else ever run into this, or do you think it's not all that important to stress over?

Moogle, I hate to say it's a bullshit process, but it is. So, hello from the interviewer side of this question! Also, I supervise overnight shift work. We still deal with the public. My work place has a panel of three people for interviews. A superior of mine, an employee directly involved in the work, or an employee of equal or higher stature, and myself are on that board. That means there are three competing interests in new hires, long term, short term, and objective to self-interest.

I have successfully recommended two employees, that were hired, that have lasted for more than 3 years within our division. It's a somewhat accomplishment considering my workplace.

To the meat and taters:

"You're a new employee who happens to walk by a senior worker arguing with a customer, what do you do?"

I can see why this sticks out to you because it's loaded and very telling question. This may be one of the most weighted questions you answered. Moogle, remember that you have recognized a bullshit, job specific question.

To me question is implying:

Heated arguments will happen.
'Customer' implies that you will have contact with the general public.
(This is a job specific question)

Curiosity begs me to think: for whom did you apply to? Do you like or can handle the above Moogle? These questions are important because I'll tell you why I'd pass on your application if you applied in my area with your answer.

"but I answered what I'd personally do in that situation; continue on towards my work station and let someone else more capable handle it."

Moogle, this is an honest and acceptable answer. Not for the position you're applying for. Here's the questions I can't ask in an interview because they could be construed to demonstrate leading and favoritism:

"Why wouldn't you listen in and see if you can help?"
"Don't you think by involving yourself in tense conversations, you can learn from senior employees on how to pacify a tense situation?"
"Why aren't you giving your colleague some back up?"
"WHY DIDN'T YOU NOTIFY A SUPERVISOR!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?? !!??!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?1/!?!?!??!?!?!!?!?!?!?!??!!?!?!??!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??!! ?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? ?!!?!??!!?!?!??!?!!??!!?!??!!??!1/?!?!!??!?!?!!?!??!!?!?!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!?!?!!?!??!?! ?!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??"

Know what these (in my mind) questions are, without real meditation, implying?

This candidate isn't a team player.
This candidate isn't willing to engage in challenging situations.
This candidate defers responsibility.
This candidate may not notify management as necessary.

It took me mere moments to start thinking this line of reasoning. Moogle, these are four negative assumptions from my position as supervisor over this type of work. Moogle, at this point I may or may not ask:

"So what about this position caught your interest?"

You will probably answer something related to finances. From experience, I know that you will burn out early, even if the money is worth it. You can't do this job on your own. For me, your score will be low.

Welcome to interviewing and stupid HR question politics.

tl;dr:
Moogle. You are being honest in your answers to questions, therefore, be honest with yourself, is this really the kind of job you want to work in? Your answer implies that you are not, HR questions are designed to sniff that out so that the interviewer(s) don't have to deal with that. However!!!! If you really want to work that job, you can choose an exaggerated role in the multiple choice questionnaire because you are willing to do that kind of work! Interviewers aren't all stupid, many can sniff lies out, but the passion and willingness to do work your not accustomed to, that can sensed and help pull you through.

Moogle
08-21-2015, 11:25 PM
don't lie, just leave out information, and if the employer wanted to know, they'll ask.

put in stuff you want them to know, and leave stuff out you don't want them to know. but if they ask, just answer honestly, and play up your strengths. lying is a big no no.

I see! That's rather clever, I'll definitely have to rearrange my resume a bit. The biggest downside actually is me trying to get them to not question my schooling. Having dropped out in gr12 I never received a diploma and if they ever asked me why, I'm not sure what I'd tell them (assuming they're even allowed to ask something personal like that).


-snip-

Wowzers! XD Shanwang, thank you so much for taking the time to write out all this. It's neat to see the interviewers POV, and boy it's a scary one. The place I was trying to get in with at that time (& still am) is Loblaws, just for overnight stocking and such. There's a few other stores I'm trying for now, but it seems there's a lot of the same questions which is quite unnerving.


Moogle, this is an honest and acceptable answer. Not for the position you're applying for. Here's the questions I can't ask in an interview because they could be construed to demonstrate leading and favoritism:

"Why wouldn't you listen in and see if you can help?"
"Don't you think by involving yourself in tense conversations, you can learn from senior employees on how to pacify a tense situation?"
"Why aren't you giving your colleague some back up?"
"WHY DIDN'T YOU NOTIFY A SUPERVISOR!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?? !!??!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?1/!?!?!??!?!?!!?!?!?!?!??!!?!?!??!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??!! ?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? ?!!?!??!!?!?!??!?!!??!!?!??!!??!1/?!?!!??!?!?!!?!??!!?!?!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!?!?!!?!??!?! ?!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??"

For all these (except the last) I'd most likely just answer with the same response: I'm not good with people. :P Which really is like the biggest flaw someone can have when trying to work in such a place, but they're the only jobs I'm qualified for with such little experience (& education) behind my belt. I used to work for a dog kennel back in highschool and it was alright, but even there I'd occasionally meet with a customer for only a few minutes sometimes and I'd just freeze. Ended up quitting after working there 3yrs and have been out of a job for like 5yrs now (which is something I'm sure will be brought up in an interview; what I've been doing with my time since then).


This candidate isn't a team player.
This candidate isn't willing to engage in challenging situations.
This candidate defers responsibility.
This candidate may not notify management as necessary.

It took me mere moments to start thinking this line of reasoning. Moogle, these are four negative assumptions from my position as supervisor over this type of work. Moogle, at this point I may or may not ask:

"So what about this position caught your interest?"

You will probably answer something related to finances. From experience, I know that you will burn out early, even if the money is worth it. You can't do this job on your own. For me, your score will be low.

You've really hit the nail on this, you're good! None of these positions I'm really interested in other than earning cash, and also them being nightshifts I'd hope there would be less contact with others.


Moogle. You are being honest in your answers to questions, therefore, be honest with yourself, is this really the kind of job you want to work in? Your answer implies that you are not, HR questions are designed to sniff that out so that the interviewer(s) don't have to deal with that. However!!!! If you really want to work that job, you can choose an exaggerated role in the multiple choice questionnaire because you are willing to do that kind of work! Interviewers aren't all stupid, many can sniff lies out, but the passion and willingness to do work your not accustomed to, that can sensed and help pull you through.

Of course it's not the ideal job for me aha, if I had such a choice everything would be so much easier. I really appreciate your insight though, Shanwang! You've given me a number of things to think about. Even if the job isn't exactly what I want I'll have to at least try harder for it since everyone else (or a majority) has to go through similar situations, and I'm no exception to that. :P

--

So I guess an update, not one call back. However, now that I'm located in a new city I'm keeping my fingers crossed for some new job opportunities.

(Also I've been keeping updated on everyone's input, it's all very much appreciated - thank you :o)

WolfNightV4X1
08-23-2015, 02:37 PM
Sorry if nothing worked out yet...

I'm not sure what you're doing in the meantime while not working but if you're free perhaps try volunteering, specifically in something that will land you a job you want. That way in submitting applications you have some experience under your belt to add to resumes and you'll be busy while waiting to be called on for some sort of job. Working for free certainly isn't ideal but can confirm from personal experience starting from the bottom to up does help

dischimera
08-24-2015, 06:42 PM
I don't know what it's like in the north, but where I live you kind of have to go with the answers they find ideal rather than honesty. They don't care. They just shove some biased questions in interviews and pick the answer that sound best.

Moogle
09-04-2015, 02:04 PM
^ I'm starting to think it's the same here too, unfortunately. =/


Sorry if nothing worked out yet...

I'm not sure what you're doing in the meantime while not working but if you're free perhaps try volunteering, specifically in something that will land you a job you want. That way in submitting applications you have some experience under your belt to add to resumes and you'll be busy while waiting to be called on for some sort of job. Working for free certainly isn't ideal but can confirm from personal experience starting from the bottom to up does help

Thanks for the suggestion, Wolf! That's definitely an option, and I'm at the point where I may have to try volunteering again. It's how I landed my first job actually; doing co-op through HS and somehow managed to get hired not long after.

As for what I've been doing.. hiding inside and moping is pretty high up on the list of activities. Gotta freakin' change my mindset, especially considering I've an abundance of free time that could be put to much better use.

Antumbra
09-04-2015, 02:10 PM
^ I'm starting to think it's the same here too, unfortunately. =/



Thanks for the suggestion, Wolf! That's definitely an option, and I'm at the point where I may have to try volunteering again. It's how I landed my first job actually; doing co-op through HS and somehow managed to get hired not long after.

As for what I've been doing.. hiding inside and moping is pretty high up on the list of activities. Gotta freakin' change my mindset, especially considering I've an abundance of free time that could be put to much better use.

Yea you could be streaming!!

Hewge
09-04-2015, 02:14 PM
Yea you could be streaming!!

Or playing Armello :v

Antumbra
09-04-2015, 02:28 PM
Or playing Armello :v

Or playing armadillo, whatever that is!

Pignog
09-09-2015, 02:22 AM
Everyone else has pretty much nailed your original question. Human Resources people get swamped with applications--sometimes hundreds--for positions, and need to screen them out somehow. Nowadays a lot of this is handled by automatically filtering applications through questionnaires, or through filtering resumes through some software for key words. Then they take what's left and an actual human looks at it, throwing out resumes with any obvious issues (no contact info, beeferoni stains,grammatical errors, etc.). Whatever's left gets a closer look and maybe to the interview stage.

This problem is compounded right now because Canada has been in a recession all year (before 2015 wasn't great either) and any reports on the economy improving are likely people juking the stats. The country has been haemorrhaging jobs for some time now; most "new" jobs are temporary, part-time, unskilled, and dead-end. I could unpack this further but I don't see the point. The situation across the country isn't good and once our housing bubble collapses in the next year or two Canada is in for some bad times.

But those are all macro issues that you can't really do anything about, short of voting if you believe in liberal democracy or smashing the state if you do not. There are still some jobs out there. Honestly, if you want a job--any job--walk down to or call up a temp agency and sign up. They'll place you somewhere. Usually the work is boring and minimum wage, but it'll give you some experience and a reference at the end of it. If you stay until the end of a temporary assignment and get laid off, I believe you can go down to Employment Ontario and sign up for a "second career" program that will pay for your training at a community college (hairdresser, computer programmer, etc.). Google [your city] temp agencies or have a look on indeed.ca.

Hope this post was helpful.