PDA

View Full Version : Warhammer & Warhammer 40,000



Damian
04-30-2014, 09:40 PM
My friend recently got me in to a tabletop game called Warhammer 40,000 aka "Money sink: the game". I've been reading up on a little bit of the classes. After deciding between the Blood Angels and the Space Wolves, I finally made a decision and bought a starter pack after he got me the codex for the one I wanted. (Guess which one ;P)

I'm really liking the concept so far and I don't even care for future settings. Some of the classes are bad ass, others are...meh.

Currently I'm trying to decide on the color scheme for my crew. I might post pics here when I do to show off how badass they are :V

Warhammer I'd like to get in to as well because of the fantasy element. It's my preference after all :3c I was thinking of going with either the High Elves or Wood Elves but I might just do both.

Anyway, enough of my nooblet talk. What are your preferred soldiers of choice? Do you play Warhammer, Warhammer 40k or both? What are some epic battles that you've had?

TheMysteriousL
04-30-2014, 09:52 PM
I was in one game of Warhammer 40k. It was an "Evil" Playthrough, and it lasted one session. Apparently, I was invited back, but I was the creepiest character, because apparently giving drugged up orphans dead cats filled with medical waste, plague rats and hypodermic needles for the glory of papa Nergle was "too far"

Takai Sakana
05-01-2014, 11:36 AM
Ahh 40k, one of the coolest but most mishandled intellectual properties of all time!

Played Eldar in 2nd edition. Space Marine (Salamanders, Imperial Fists, Blood Angels), Inquisition (Sisters, Grey Knights) and Imperial Guard in 5th. Haven't played in 2+ years and should probably sell the mountain of stuff I have. Used to read "Yes the Truth Hurts" blog for strategies, army building tips, etc. One of the most fun ways to play that I found was doing 2v2 - makes the game take really long but it becomes even more epic!

Socks the Fox
05-01-2014, 09:32 PM
Orks. Aka, "massive blob of cheap-ass (points-wise, not $$-wise) grunts."

I think I had a pipe-dream list of like 4 squads of 20 grunts with a little bit of everything. I was going to paint them with different colored bases to differentiate the squads purely for bookkeeping purposes, then move them all as one big group, crushing everything in their way.

Space Wolves. I loved their iconography!

And my own generic Space Marines-based chapter, Salve Felinus. The Hello Kitty chapter. Because nothing says Fuck You like winning a tournament with pastel pink and white doom with pom-poms and streamers on the bikes.

I need to get back into painting them.

Derin Darkpaw
05-01-2014, 11:54 PM
I used to play back in high school. Had a Tau army and used to go this game shop to play every week. Loved my crisis suits. Something about giant mechs dashing around the map with jet packs while peppering the enemy with so many guns just felt absolutely amazing. Also I will always remember the time my commander and his two bodyguards managed to take out a Dark Elder Archon and his entire retinue in hand to hand combat. Eventually though Yu-gi-oh took over the game store, all the Warhammer people stop coming, and then I didn't have any one to play with. Ended up selling my army back in college.

Damian
05-09-2014, 01:41 AM
I put together my first dude! It's not the head I wanted since I needed a neck and the one I chose was intended for flat surfaces.

http://i812.photobucket.com/albums/zz46/AleutheWolf/054.jpg (http://s812.photobucket.com/user/AleutheWolf/media/054.jpg.html)

FishNChips
05-09-2014, 10:45 AM
Shit Aleu, you're making me jealous. I'd love to get back into 40k again.

Wanna team up with a swarm of Imperial Guardsmen painted like german soldiers?

Damian
05-09-2014, 12:25 PM
Shit Aleu, you're making me jealous. I'd love to get back into 40k again.

Wanna team up with a swarm of Imperial Guardsmen painted like german soldiers?
Haha the funny thing is, the guy that got me in to 40k has an army of Imperial Guard that I'll be fighting against.

But yes I would love that :3c

SirCoffeecup
05-10-2014, 08:34 AM
Oh man, it's been ages since I last threw my army of metal and rust on the table and said aloud "NECRONS! RISE AND KILL THE LIVING AND THE UNDEAD"
And then proceeded to wreck my terribad friend who played Chaos. You don't believe how bad he is. Instead of using his expendable cultists to draw fire and make meaty cover for his heavier squadmates, he puts his heavy guns out in the open and places the cultists in places with no good firing angles, and he's best at making bumrushes at my guys when I've got my resurrection orbs and whatnot and units inside buildings and all my rapid fire guns going zap on him..
And his tank usage, oh my word.. No strategic brain whatsoever. I miss these fights now :c

They've made some decent videogames about WH40k, Dawn Of War games are pretty cool and if you get one, we can totally play them since we can't actually fight IRL. Personally I prefer the pre-DoW2 games.
I quite like the lore of the 40k universe, and games allow me to dig deeper into it!

FlynnCoyote
05-27-2014, 09:28 AM
Ooooh yesyesyesyes!

Love this game, been trapped within its money lined prison walls for near a decade now.

Tyranids, necrons, to a degree orks and eldar. Basically Xenos are my forte. Anything human or human derived I like to play against and crush. Which works well enough for me since my younger bro is a huge Imperial fanboy. XD

Be afraid!

http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2012/031/3/8/nightbringer_front_by_serpion5-d4oadpb.jpg

NovaCaine
10-05-2014, 02:05 AM
Love me some Grey knights! And Sisters of battle too.
I'm debating on weather or not to create a mini Dire army though.

I don't play that often, I'm more of a hobbyist(Painting and collecting)

FlynnCoyote
10-06-2014, 03:14 AM
Never did get an update Aleu. How goes your wolves?

TeenageAngst
10-08-2014, 02:26 AM
I'm in the process of building a Dark Eldar army, but 7e codex destroyed Wyches, which is what I was going to build my strategy around. Seriously, without haywire grenades just how the fuck are we supposed to take out armor? And don't get me started on the laundry list of named heroes they removed. Right now it's looking like splitter racks and lots o' warriors is the B&B of the army since they got buffs but my god is GeeDubs pushing haemunculai and wracks.

Fortunately all is not lost, we have our Archons still and we also have Battle Brothers with Eldar, so we can get those sweet sweet rerolls.

medacris
10-08-2014, 05:16 PM
I haven't played, but my ex did a fantastic cosplay of...someone from Warhammer 40k about three years ago. We left the convention hall for lunch, and he propped his prop gun against the table so he could eat. He had modified a NERF gun, you could still tell it was a NERF gun, and it was tied with a yellow ribbon, as per convention policy. A woman eating at the next table gave us a dirty look. I explained to her that he and I had been at the comic book convention nearby, that he was wearing fake armor, with a fake gun, and somehow that made it even worse. She made a nasty comment about us being freaks, and left. She was mildly irritating, but ultimately, I knew not to pay her any mind.

I'd still like to play Warhammer/40k at some point, I'm just nervous about being a newbie and having to learn everything about it from the beginning.

BlueJaySF
10-08-2014, 09:34 PM
Only WH/40K gaming material I shall soon own will be the Dark Elves army book (sixth edition, and planning to buy an older edition for the hilarious retro art, which perfectly mimics an '80s metal album cover).

I've read several books (Master of Death, The Sundering, and reading Honour Imperialis, and plan to read the Ulrika trilogy). Want to read some more 40K novels, but Horus Heresy is 31 books long and having read the event's coverage on a wiki, I'm really only interested in the Drop Site Massacre and the Battle of Terra (the latter no doubt coming out several years from now, given how slowly this publishing is proceeding).

I want badly to read a third Blood of Nagash novel by Josh Reynolds. Loved Master of Death, but Blood Dragon has been shelved in favor of some unknown other project Games Workshop has convinced Reynolds to work on. Damn it.

TeenageAngst
10-08-2014, 11:07 PM
I've stayed away from 40k literature because as 1d4chan points out the quality is all over the place, and I don't want to end up getting something that turns into snuff porn half of the way through.

FlynnCoyote
10-13-2014, 05:10 AM
I've stayed away from 40k literature because as 1d4chan points out the quality is all over the place, and I don't want to end up getting something that turns into snuff porn half of the way through.

The loss of haywire grenades on entire squads was necessary. Otherwise the DE single-handedly destroy any vehicle in the game, even those fucking knight titans.

TeenageAngst
10-13-2014, 09:05 PM
Which is what they get for hiding in METAL BAWKSES! THE COWARDS! THE FEWLS! Wyches took away their metal boxes.

Really though what the hell are Wyches going to be used for now anyway?

FlynnCoyote
10-14-2014, 03:17 AM
Which is what they get for hiding in METAL BAWKSES! THE COWARDS! THE FEWLS! Wyches took away their metal boxes.

Really though what the hell are Wyches going to be used for now anyway?

Generic close combat oriented unit, up there with Slugga Boyz, Hormagaunts and daemonettes.

As opposed to Close combat powerhouse, like Meganobz, genestealers and bloodletters.

:D

TeenageAngst
10-14-2014, 04:20 AM
Yeah but it's a waste of a Raider to carry them around without that ability and they're too expensive to just have out there. Plus they're useless against anything even slightly stabby. I'd much rather have warriors zooming around with splitter racks at that point.

FlynnCoyote
10-15-2014, 07:39 AM
Yeah but it's a waste of a Raider to carry them around without that ability and they're too expensive to just have out there. Plus they're useless against anything even slightly stabby. I'd much rather have warriors zooming around with splitter racks at that point.

That's exactly the list I ran even back when wyches were still good, and it was ridiculously successful. A blaster in every squad, a lance on every vehicle and everyone else carrying poison guns means you can take on pretty much anything. Three or four such squads is a very strong core, and it leaves you points to play with more specialized units. Incubi are great, especially with Drazhar. Mandrakes are a little better now, and the haemonculus covens and their crew of crazy shit units are as good as ever.

The slight debuff of wyches means zip in the overall scheme. You still have plenty of cc options and points wise, you get what you pay for. Strategy is as key here as statlines.

Of course I have several years since removed my focus from the commorites and am awaiting my hardback necron codex, half to see what they'll do to my weapons and half to see if they'll undo all the balls ups they made with their new lore.

TeenageAngst
10-15-2014, 08:34 AM
I'm probably just going to throw everything into Raiders, Warriors, Reavers, and Ravagers. If it can't move half the table in a single turn while still getting shots off, it has no place in a DE army.

BlueJaySF
10-16-2014, 04:49 PM
Got my Dark Elves Army Book today, the 1996 one. For some reason, the vendor included his state militia propaganda business card with the packing slip. Since I'm not a wilderness survival/gun nut, I tossed the card.

FlynnCoyote
10-17-2014, 08:45 AM
I'm probably just going to throw everything into Raiders, Warriors, Reavers, and Ravagers. If it can't move half the table in a single turn while still getting shots off, it has no place in a DE army.

That's pretty much your winning list. Don't overlook scourges either.


Got my Dark Elves Army Book today, the 1996 one. For some reason, the vendor included his state militia propaganda business card with the packing slip. Since I'm not a wilderness survival/gun nut, I tossed the card.

As in the previous edition or an even older one? I haven't been in the hobby anywhere near that long. =3

TeenageAngst
10-17-2014, 02:27 PM
I might run 5th edition codex just cuz haywire grenades. That's what I love about these games, you can always just play a different version if you don't like the new rules. Also, I'm painting my dudes (mostly dudettes?) like a cross between Hellraiser and an 80s hair metal band.

I'm practicing my zebra print on spess mehreens.

FlynnCoyote
10-17-2014, 05:54 PM
I might run 5th edition codex just cuz haywire grenades. That's what I love about these games, you can always just play a different version if you don't like the new rules. Also, I'm painting my dudes (mostly dudettes?) like a cross between Hellraiser and an 80s hair metal band.

I'm practicing my zebra print on spess mehreens.

I'm gonna recommend against that, purely for the sake of fairness. Back then vehicles worked differently, and it didn't make a great deal of difference how many haywire grenades you carried in a squad. Now though, with hull points and the new ways to attack vehicles in cc, haywire grenades are literally game changing. No vehicles would be worth taking against that army.

It would be like playing 3e orks or csm because of the old choppa and chainaxe rules. It would tip the balance and change the entire meta. You'd never use terminators again.

The game as it is now is actually as balanced as I've ever seen it (except for dirtbag eldar with their wraithknights and such) due mainly to each army having specific strengths and weaknesses. New dark eldar excel at speed attacks and using mass poison, butyou still have plenty of anti tank options available. Remember every squad of kabalites can take a blaster and every vehicle can take a dark lance.

The game changes each edition, it's a matter of devising new tactics, there's nothing to be gained from sticking to an old codex just because you like it better. Otherwise I'd still be playing 3e tyranids.

BlueJaySF
10-17-2014, 06:49 PM
As in the previous edition or an even older one? I haven't been in the hobby anywhere near that long. =3

Yes, both Dark Elves codexes are older editions.

http://6inchmove.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/gw850160.jpg

http://whfb.lexicanum.com/mediawiki/images/thumb/6/6e/Dark_Elves_4_Cover.jpg/220px-Dark_Elves_4_Cover.jpg

TeenageAngst
10-17-2014, 09:30 PM
I'm gonna recommend against that, purely for the sake of fairness. Back then vehicles worked differently, and it didn't make a great deal of difference how many haywire grenades you carried in a squad. Now though, with hull points and the new ways to attack vehicles in cc, haywire grenades are literally game changing. No vehicles would be worth taking against that army.

It would be like playing 3e orks or csm because of the old choppa and chainaxe rules. It would tip the balance and change the entire meta. You'd never use terminators again.

The game as it is now is actually as balanced as I've ever seen it (except for dirtbag eldar with their wraithknights and such) due mainly to each army having specific strengths and weaknesses. New dark eldar excel at speed attacks and using mass poison, butyou still have plenty of anti tank options available. Remember every squad of kabalites can take a blaster and every vehicle can take a dark lance.


Get a loada this guy here.

DE were never a high caliber army, they held on by the skin of their teeth unless you knew how to play them *well* even with haywires. Just cause I can send a suicide unit to kill a piece of armor doesn't mean I'm some broken unstoppable force, just field more shooty dudes.



The game changes each edition, it's a matter of devising new tactics, there's nothing to be gained from sticking to an old codex just because you like it better. Otherwise I'd still be playing 3e tyranids.

You're literally saying there's nothing to be gained by playing a previous version of the rules. You know, except fun. That's like saying there's no reason to play 3.5 anymore now that we have 4th edition and Pathfinder. My friend still drags out previous editions for his Chaos marines because they've removed so much cool stuff for them, and the only people who complain are usually *that guy* who has some broken army list (always spess mehreens) based off min-max stats and lots of expensive units. The kinda guys who wouldn't even bother coming up with cheese as to why they'd field an entire army of said terminators. The kind of guy who would whine really loud if you veto'd their Warforged Druid.

Don't be that guy, play for fun, not balance.

FlynnCoyote
10-18-2014, 12:53 AM
Get a loada this guy here.

DE were never a high caliber army, they held on by the skin of their teeth unless you knew how to play them *well* even with haywires. Just cause I can send a suicide unit to kill a piece of armor doesn't mean I'm some broken unstoppable force, just field more shooty dudes.

Sorry what? There was a time when DE owned 40k. Even a shits and giggles list had an incredible amount of damage output. Yes they're fragile, always were and always will be, but that's less of an issue when your units can turn monsters and tanks inside out before they can aim their own weapons in your general direction.

The only reason they ever failed was due to an inexperienced player or horrendous dice. Mathematically and strategically, they were top tier for some time. That was the point I was making, the new codex brings them into balance.


You're literally saying there's nothing to be gained by playing a previous version of the rules. You know, except fun. That's like saying there's no reason to play 3.5 anymore now that we have 4th edition and Pathfinder. My friend still drags out previous editions for his Chaos marines because they've removed so much cool stuff for them, and the only people who complain are usually *that guy* who has some broken army list (always spess mehreens) based off min-max stats and lots of expensive units. The kinda guys who wouldn't even bother coming up with cheese as to why they'd field an entire army of said terminators. The kind of guy who would whine really loud if you veto'd their Warforged Druid.

Don't be that guy, play for fun, not balance.

Sorry, what, again??? You just told me you're going to play an older version of the codex "just cuz haywire grenades" and then have the nerve to tell me I'm a power player for recommending against it? I play tyranids and necrons ffs, I told you this. Between the two, those codexes have had a combined five years of competitive codex and rulebook lineup out of 20+ years of 40k. I couldn't be a power player if I tried, my only argument was for the sake of keeping the game balanced.

Yes I play for fun first, but it has to be fun for BOTH players in order to work, no? Hence, Balance. The current rulebook and available codexes have achieved this better than any previous version I've played.

TeenageAngst
10-18-2014, 01:14 AM
I'm sorry but isn't there a crazy necron god that kills stuff when it moves, that's so OP it's pretty much banned from official tournaments? Yeah, I'm not buying that cheese fella.

FlynnCoyote
10-18-2014, 01:55 AM
I'm sorry but isn't there a crazy necron god that kills stuff when it moves, that's so OP it's pretty much banned from official tournaments? Yeah, I'm not buying that cheese fella.

You're talking about the transcendant c'tan with the transliminal stride I presume? That's a superheavy, and I believe superheavies in general are banned from tournaments, so nothing really special there. Anything else?

TeenageAngst
10-18-2014, 05:02 AM
Actually it can be deployed as a Lord of War, so no, it's allowable in any kind of casual game. You know, where a 5th edition DE codex might happen to turn up.

FlynnCoyote
10-18-2014, 05:33 AM
Actually it can be deployed as a Lord of War, so no, it's allowable in any kind of casual game. You know, where a 5th edition DE codex might happen to turn up.

Good point, :D So how do your haywire grenades make a difference where your squads of splinter weapons wouldn't against that thing? Hmm?

TeenageAngst
10-18-2014, 05:36 AM
Good point, :D So how do your haywire grenades make a difference where your squads of splinter weapons wouldn't against that thing? Hmm?

They wouldn't, my best protection would probably be using said wyches as fodder. Or better yet, having an ally who doesn't really know what they're doing.

FlynnCoyote
10-18-2014, 06:31 AM
Then why does it matter which codex you use?

TeenageAngst
10-18-2014, 06:47 AM
Good question, so no complaints if I field 5th edition then. :3

FlynnCoyote
10-18-2014, 06:57 AM
Good question, so no complaints if I field 5th edition then. :3

You're missing the point. You cited haywire grenades as the reason for wanting to use the 5e codex, then gave the transcendant c'tan as reason for wanting to use an older "stronger" codex, something that has no relation to each other at all. Especially since the big c'tan did not exist during 5e.

If you were wanting to use rules for Asdubrael Vect, that'd be one thing. But you want an OP unit that spells death for anything with an armour value despite lecturing me on my armies being OP?

Okay.

TeenageAngst
10-18-2014, 07:17 AM
If you were wanting to use rules for Asdubrael Vect, that'd be one thing. But you want an OP unit that spells death for anything with an armour value despite lecturing me on my armies being OP?

First off suicide wyches were nowhere nearly as devastating as you claim unless you were one of those numptards who stacks their table with titans or armor at the total expense of units of dudes. Second, Vect and his merry chopping-block'd men are a fantastic reason as well, and something I probably should have mentioned earlier considering his sheer awesomeness.

BlueJaySF
10-18-2014, 02:21 PM
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_SY28VkP2gKo/TNxcfMEOB-I/AAAAAAAAAe4/hlh648xZ41o/s1600/slaanesh.jpg

Rokusho
12-08-2014, 01:21 PM
Oh sweet WH 40K :) Which reminds me I still have the "Dark Vengeance" I need to get too, still mostly sitting in the box untouched since last year.

I was once really into WH 40K or at least collecting them as I've never had anyone to play the game with,I'm mostly just collect them. Not as much as I once did but fun to do every now and then. Played one game at the store once, was pretty fun.

I love the Tau "For the greater good" and off course the space marines are cool too :)

Damian
12-08-2014, 04:36 PM
Never did get an update Aleu. How goes your wolves?

Holy mother of cats I had no idea this thread was still going.

I forgot it even existed, lol ^^;

Honestly school has been taking up aaalll of the time so I haven't been giving time for my space woofs. I'm really sad actually but the semester is almost over and have one class left until I get my degree so then I can nerd-binge.

BlueJaySF
03-01-2015, 09:23 PM
Finished reading The Flight of the Eisenstein the other day. My review:

When I first read a Warhammer 40,000 story, it was "Cadian Blood" by Aaron Dembski-Bowden, the first story in the Honour Imperialis anthology. The bad guys in it were the XIV Legion, the Death Guard, plague-stricken Space Marines. I'm not much into rot and decay and grotesque things, but I thought the Death Guard were cool bad guys, and after reading the Warhammer 40,000 wikia's overview of the Horus Heresy, I decided I absolutely had to see the XIV as heroes before their fall to the service of the Chaos God Nurgle, Lord of Decay.

This novel starts some time before the Horus Heresy kicks off, despite being fourth in that saga. Death Guard Battle-Captain Nathanial Garro, an Earth-born Space Marine of honor and courage, fights the Emperor's Great Crusade, killing aliens and securing space for the Imperium of Man. While doing so, he is given a chilling warning, a prophecy that all he holds dear will be destroyed. Dismissing it, he continues to follow orders until Horus and several Primarchs (super-warrior generals who command the various Legions) betray the Imperium and slaughter many loyalist Marines.

Horrified, Garro and his frigate manage to barely escape from the battle, but in doing so they encounter a glimpse of their ultimate enemy, Chaos itself. Desperate to deliver news of Horus's betrayal to the Emperor, the captain and his allies take chance after chance, but the risks grow greater as the stakes rise, and their own fellow warriors may not be ready for the stunning truth Garro carries.

If you are unfamiliar with Warhammer/40,000, the novels are lengthy but often well-written. They do not skirt violence, though, and you will often find yourself reading brutal fight scenes, wherein combatants are cut open, torn limb from limb, set ablaze, infested with plague and insects, and more. These are war stories, because as the saying goes, "In the 41st millennium, there is only war." While this novel takes place in the 31st, it is still fairly graphic, though you will find that the scenes depicting such are not outnumbering the more ordinary violence of gunfights or character introspection.

The characters are very well done, and you can connect with both the factual and secular Garro, who does not have time for gods or superstition and his servant Kaleb, who believes that the Emperor is a living god and that worshiping him is the right thing to do. By the book's end, you see that there are false gods and real ones, and the consequences of losing faith in the genuine article and the rewards of holding true to your spirit.

If you want a novel about space-faring super-soldiers who find out their leaders aren't all they thought they were and that true horror awaits them if they fail to fight the good fight, but who also find themselves stronger in the face of adversity, then this novel is for you.

Damian
03-19-2015, 09:10 PM
Hey guys.....
Any painting tips? Im beginning on my wolves and it's super hard. I mean i knew it wasn't going to be easy but damn.


Also i accidentally got semi-gloss paint and now they're shiny wolves.

Socks the Fox
03-19-2015, 11:11 PM
A few tips, assuming you're interested in mass painting rather than detailed individuals:

First off, clean your models. Plastic, metal, resin, doesn't matter. This involves two things: Take a knife to clean off all the extra bits from the molding process, smooth things out, etc. Then give them a scrub with soap and a toothbrush. This cleans off the mold-release agents/greases/finger oils that mess up the next step

Second, spray them with primer. You want to do this from about a foot or so away. Too close and you blap all the detail with too much primer. too far and the primer dries in the air. Typically I put them on a paper plate which I can then turn so I can spray them from all number of directions. I'd do it from 3 or so angles. Black is easier to do shading on and metals pop so much better, but is a PITA for lighter colors. White makes colors more vibrant but you have to do all the shading yourself, which is not so great when you have 20-30 minis to paint. Grey is kind of blegh, you end up muddying the colors and can't use it for shading like with black. I usually use black.

Third, paint a base coat. There are two ways, but essentially it'll be the same for both. Either paint the "shaded" coat, or paint the "midtone" coat. The shaded method is nice because you can build up the color vibrancy on black. The midtone method is nice because it's less paint used later. Don't paint in the little crevices to make details pop a bit more. For metal areas, make it black.

Fourth, paint the other coat. Whichever you picked above, do the other now. If you did midtones, get in and do the shadows in the shady areas. If you did shadows, build up the midtones on the raised areas. For metals, this would be either a gunmetal or bronze/brass, depending on if you want silver or gold.

Fifth, paint the highlights. Not too hard, just a more vibrant version of whatever midtone you used, be it whiter or more saturated. For metal, you go along with a steel or silver, or gold. How much defines how bright your metal reads. You might even go over it again with one shade lighter (i.e. brass would only be black->brass->only very edges gold, but gold would be black->brass->gold->edges with a hint of silver).

Optionally, do a dark ink wash. essentially water down a transparent ink and coat the entire thing in a thin layer. It should all run into the cracks (especially as it dries) and darken the most shadowy of shadows to bring out the details. You might need to touch things up a bit if it dulls the highlights too much.

Last, protection coat it. A lot of people use Dulcote because it completely kills any unwanted shine. I use a gloss polyurethane spray, then dulcote because the gloss brings out the color, and the dulcote kills the shine, and the poly protects the paint because it was designed for floors.

With only 3-4 main colors, you can do a sloppy squad of orks in a night or two and still have them turn out pretty sweet.

Damian
03-19-2015, 11:46 PM
Well I meant my wolf wolves. Not the marines quite yet. I figured i should work on something easier first to get the hang of it. They're also going to be somewhat individualistic for the first couple then whatever else i feel like.

I did notice the blop of primer when i went too close. I cleaned it off for the most part.

Oh my god though. There arent enough tiny brushes

BlueJaySF
03-20-2015, 05:03 PM
I'll have to keep those tips in mind myself, if I ever bother collecting and painting a handful of figures.

Finished reading Betrayer by Aaron Dembski-Bowden, now reading Vengeful Spirit by Graham McNeil. Betrayer was incredible, and I'm enjoying Spirit pretty well.

BlueJaySF
03-21-2015, 09:18 PM
Since I'm feeling better, I'll give my review, then.

Betrayer (Aaron Dembski-Bowden, published by Black Library as part of its Warhammer 40,000: The Horus Heresy novel saga)

The novel's title is a perfect one, and perfectly curious. The Heresy itself is an epic-scale betrayal by nearly half of the Imperium of Man against the other half, but the focus of the characters is actually loyalty: Kharn's loyalty to his primarch Angron and his best friend Argel Tal, Lorgar's loyalty to Angron, and the World Eaters' loyalty to each other in the face of uncontrollable savagery.

The World Eaters' loyalty is tested to and even beyond the breaking point again and again. Not merely from being on the rebellious side of a galaxy-spanning brutal civil war, but from modeling themselves after a merciless leader who broadly despises them. Angron is helpless to cranial implants that drive him to rage and murder, and in trying to connect with their internally-scarred lord, the warriors put into their own heads similar implants that drive them to the same dark places, but Angron still doesn't care for them.

Lorgar's motivation is to save Angron, who has long disliked him and considers him to be the weakest of all the primarchs. With the cortical implants killing Angron, Lorgar has to carry out a desperate plan of planet-by-planet genocide to summon demonic energies as the only means to keep his brother from a terrible death.

Each of the character is done exceedingly well. Lorgar is a holy man preaching demon-worship, fatalistic in his faith despite the horror of it, and this is reflected in Argel Tal, who makes it clear to Kharn that although he wishes the universe was not underpinned by such horrible monsters, it is and he cannot and will not deny it.

Perhaps the breakout character of this is Syrgalah, the Ember Queen. She's a Warhound Titan (not to be confused with the War Hound Legion, the former name for the World Eaters Legion), and is a cross between ED-409 from Robocop and the Gundam mech. During the final battle, Syrgalah and her many packs of fellow Warhound Titans commit one of the most impressive acts in the novel while battling a far superior Titan.

The novel is bloody as is the norm for a Black Library work, especially since entire worlds are killed during the "shadow crusade" by the World Eaters and Word Bearers Legions. It's not grotesque, but it's violent and serious and highlights the brutality of war even as it does the importance of loyalty.

Overall, this novel is a fantastic read about brotherhood in the face of brutality and twisted morals, and I very highly recommend it.

smelge
03-25-2015, 08:44 AM
Played a few tournaments years ago, but left the whole game behind when it got too expensive and I needed to sell all my stuff tokeep cars running and stuff.

Used to have a ridiculous 5000 point Tyranid army, and I always went for mostly numbers with a few hard hitters in there. It was always fun to see peoples faces in 1500point games where they'd have about 20 models and I had 60. Fewerr shooty things, just a pile of close combat symbiotes. No tank would stand long against my combat Carnifexes. Most battles would just be the other player trying to stay the fuck away from my models.

BlueJaySF
03-25-2015, 05:36 PM
I watched a bunch of gaming vids on Youtube, and found them to be fairly entertaining. Mostly watched pre-Heresy Death Guard, and one vid the dude's commander and Deathshroud bodyguards tried to Deep Strike but failed the roll and got lost in the warp forever, so that counted as a technical victory point.

Another vid had this guy, Dave from Mini War Gaming, I think, showing off his 34,000 point Chaos army, all kinds of Chaos Space Marines and daemons and stuff. Was truly impressive. I didn't watch the vid for this 600k point collection.

I wrote up a list of units I want to eventually make for my own private collection, some general figures and some custom units. Will take me forever to do, even without painting them all.

BlueJaySF
03-29-2015, 06:34 PM
http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q186/DrenKrelar/GreyKnightsGhostbusters.jpg

BlueJaySF
04-02-2015, 09:00 PM
In short, Vengeful Spirit is amazing.

The novel focuses on two quests: Warmaster Horus Lupercal's search for information that will ultimately lead to secret knowledge of how his father, the Emperor of Mankind, became as powerful as he is in the hopes of replicating that achievement; and a small strike team's mission to infiltrate the Warmaster's command ship (which is the novel's title) and mark a path through its interior by which to assassinate him.

Over the course of the tale, you see both the villain and the unlikely heroes in both positive and negative lights. Horus is a ruthless, genocidal madman, but he genuinely gives a damn about his friends and brother Primarchs, taking the time even to personally restore their weaponry to its full glory and talking with them about how they're holding together after harrowing ordeals. On the other end, the strike team (led by Garviel Loken, a character explored in Horus Rising) is trying to do the right thing that any sane person would do and help kill Horus, but his inner doubts are eating him up, and the task only becomes more difficult the closer he gets to his goal.

The bulk of the novel is the Battle of Molech, which is a war both on the world itself and in the stars above it. Orbital defense platforms, space cruiser clashes, boarding attacks, everything goes. It's a massive and brutal clash, and once the Traitor Legions hit the surface, things only get worse (their battles become so pitched that you'd swear all of the Godzilla monsters were hired by the Call of Duty game makers to star in a mega-war flick directed by a coked-out Micheal Bay). Giant robots, demons, super-soldiers, tanks, missiles, orbital bombardment, everything you can think of shows up (and yes, that's only the tip of the iceberg).

You really connect with not just Loken and Horus, but also a number of characters both attacking and defending Molech. Horus's personal council each display depth of character that makes you want to root for their survival, even when they're murderous jerks. Similarly, though so many of them die (and typically horribly), you want a bunch of the defenders to escape at least that battle they're caught up in, if only to die in defense of their home a little later. You want the attackers to win because they're trying to build a better Imperium for everyone and you want the defenders to prevail because their home is being destroyed.

By the conclusion of the story, even though the war is still on for some time to come, you have what you came looking for: a bloody, epic-scale clash between an Emperor-to-be and the planet standing in the way of his destiny. It's a thick read (over 600 pages), but you'll love every word of it and then some.

Very highly recommend.

BlueJaySF
04-06-2015, 10:13 PM
Finished Honour Imperialis just a short bit ago.

At 765 pages and less than twenty bucks, it's very much worth the price. Three beefy adventures with four short tales, showcasing a variety of enemies for the Imperial Guard to battle. Going to end up rereading the first two stories (Cadian Blood and Redemption Corps) at some point in the near future, definitely.

FlynnCoyote
04-07-2015, 03:44 AM
Guys since I'm here, I'll give Heresy Online a plug. It's a forum much like this one built around wargaming. We have sections for modelling, gaming, painting and even roleplaying if you like serious story based rp's in the 40k or WHF settings.

http://www.heresy-online.net/forums/index.php

Feel free to say hi to me there, I'm one of the mods, moniker is Serpion5. Normally I wouldn't plug a site like this but I don't think Heresy is really competition to Weasyl in any way.


@Aleu, in regards to painting the actual wolves in a Space wolf army, all I can say is drybrush and shade. It will practically paint itself and if you can find a tutorial online or make it to an actual gw store, it will be childishly easy to learn. If you're okay with your marines having a dirtyish look to them, you could almost apply the same techniques on them as well.

TeenageAngst
04-12-2015, 07:38 PM
So after months of on-again off-again painting and modelling, I finally finished my first vehicle.

http://d.facdn.net/art/teenageangst/1428881332/1428881332.teenageangst_40k.jpg

I think it looks pretty boss.

Damian
04-13-2015, 10:14 PM
Man I bet that was a bitch and a half to paint.

TeenageAngst
04-14-2015, 12:50 AM
No one plays Dark Eldar because it's easy -_-;

Damian
04-14-2015, 01:09 AM
I wasnt talking about playing but okay.

TeenageAngst
04-14-2015, 01:19 AM
Well, playing, painting, modeling, it's all kinda rolled into the same thing. Though it'd be funny to see someone try to get away with just playing it. Have you figured out your painting technique yet?

Damian
04-14-2015, 01:30 AM
"It's not unpainted! It's Warhammer Noir. I'm going for class!"

And no I haven't. I will be going to a class at this little gaming store that teaches the basics. His models are like, outrageously good. I must know his secrets.

TeenageAngst
04-14-2015, 01:52 AM
My friend's been teaching me everything he knows. He's won some painting competitions with his Nurgle army and over Christmas we spent almost an entire week just sitting around painting. It definitely helps having someone to show you the ropes.

BlueJaySF
04-24-2015, 07:09 PM
Finished Malodrax by Ben Counter.

Overall, I was fairly pleased by this. It's more in-tune with the Space Marines I was originally introduced to (post-Heresy super-soldiers of the God-Emperor), and the Imperial Fists are a fairly solid lot. Ben Counter does a good job portraying each of them, the cautious oversight of Chaplain Lycaon and the single-minded revenge of Darnath Lysander (main character on cover) taking a spotlight most of the time, especially the latter.

The book chronicles Lysander's involvement with the daemon world Malodrax, both his capture by his Legion's most hated enemies, the Iron Warriors, and then his return. Every chapter alternates between the present (return to Malodrax) and the past (his capture and eventual escape). Because of the nature of both Legions (Fists being the ultimate fortress constructors and Warriors being the ultimate fortress destroyers), there's a disturbing dichotomy, a twisted parallel that makes things all the more interesting, as it becomes a matter of fighting not just their former comrades but also fighting your evil twins.

During his capture, we see just how deadly the Iron Warriors are, construction the mega-fortress of Kulgarde, churning out war engines to launch an eventual massive assault, and we realize just how difficult it will be to escape and return with enough power to smash these villains down. Later on, while journeying across Malodrax, Lysander learns that not only is he facing his old foes and the new ones populating this daemon world, but that he is also set against the planet itself: not just environmentally, Malodrax itself is actually working to destroy him in its quest to eliminate those unworthy of being there.

Perhaps worst of all is that Lysander must face his own inner horrors, that he lost many comrades to the Iron Warriors and that he must make hard choices to escape and seek revenge, choices that many would rather die than commit to. He's compromising his own morals and very much blaspheming his own beliefs in order to uphold them. This creates an interesting character flaw: rather than just be imperfect and make mistakes, he is actively working against his own identity and lifestyle so that he can one day return to it.

A running backstory is an Inquisitor's record of the world and its folk, opening at every chapter and as well repeatedly throughout the novel. The Inquisitor undergoes a harsh journey to learn the secrets of the world and its would-be lords, trading away his integrity and coming very close to being the very thing he seeks to destroy. In the end, his tale is arguably the backbone of the novel, fully addressing not just the speaking evils of the world of Malodrax but also the evil of the planet itself, that omnipresent force that is at once within reach of justice and yet untouchable.

My only regrets for the novel are that two characters (understandably) meet their own ends, as I thought the one would possibly survive a terrible fight and I had hoped to see how the other fell from grace a bit more, but those are nitpicks ultimately and do not impede on the overall quality of the book.

In summary, Malodrax is a good read if you are into Space Marines, siege warfare and deception, and quests to prove one's convictions. I had little love for the Imperial Fists or the Iron Warriors (I kind-of liked the former and their Primarch, and actively disliked the latter and theirs), but after reading this novel, I had a better appreciation of the steel-hard determination of the Fists and the cruel genius of the Warriors.

TeenageAngst
04-24-2015, 10:36 PM
Go read Dawn of War: Tempest for us plz.

Edit:

So I ended up reading some 40k literature myself, specifically the Path of the Dark Eldar compilation. Spoilers obvs.

I spent the past week absorbed in the book and after all 765 pages there wasn't really an ending. I mean the book ran out, there stopped being text, there was even an epilogue, but it didn't... end. For instance, if a character didn't die, and for a book about the Dark Eldar a surprisingly short list of main characters died, then they just kind of stopped existing. I can't tell if this was intentional or if the writer realized halfway through he didn't have enough time or energy to finish writing the myriad paths he created so he just kinda baked the unknown into the pie.

The entire thing was filled with a very George Lucas "Episode I" kinda feel in the way it kept ripping to points of view of one character to the next. There were times when five separate stories were being told at once. The only ending I'd say about half of these PoVs got was merely failing to be incorporated in the gestalt of the rest of the novel. The novel itself is 2 short stories and 3 "books" thrown together in a compilation, and at the end of the first book, things were more or less together, Episode I syndrome notwithstanding. By book two you had at least a few PoVs that just kinda faded from existence altogether never to be mentioned again. Book three ended up doing just that to essentially the entire active cast of characters.

I can understand why. This is a Warhammer 40k book. Obviously canon characters can't be killed off, the world needs to stay the way it is, progressing the storyline is forbidden, etc. However the original characters were killed off or sentenced to a eternal existential quandary seemingly at random. That's why I think the story kinda got away from the author and he just decided to roll with it. There was a subtle but noticeable change in tone, in how the book felt, as it progressed. It went from a narrative, to a narrative voice, to a PoV narration by a character in the story.

This didn't detract from the quality though, and even if it was a utilitarian measure of the author digging himself out of a hole, it served the purpose of gluing my eyeballs to paper for 6 days straight. It also taught me a lot about the Dark Eldar as a faction, which is the entire reason I got the book to begin with. It's fantastically paced and for every storyline it abandons the book reminds you that it hasn't forget ones you've long thought left for dead. The characters are interesting if entirely unlikable due to the fact that they're all a bunch of murderous psychopaths, but there's such a wide variety of murderous psychopathy going on that they kind of become an interesting illustration of the world rumbling within itself.

Overall it was an incredibly enjoyable shaggy dog story to end all shaggy dog stories, save of course "better nate than lever."

BlueJaySF
04-27-2015, 04:24 PM
This will probably cost ten thousand dollars just for the body... (http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/LAS50DFG41_SEG57E.jpg).

Damian
04-27-2015, 09:19 PM
This will probably cost ten thousand dollars just for the body... (http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/LAS50DFG41_SEG57E.jpg).
So an arm, leg, and a kidney.

BlueJaySF
05-03-2015, 02:03 PM
Finished reading Death of Integrity. Loved it absolutely.

The plot begins with a Chapter of Space Marines, the Novamarines (who are descended from the Ultramarines and Guilliman) arriving to aid their cousin-Chapter, the Blood Drinkers (descended from the Blood Angels and Sanguinius) in destroying the space hulk called the Death of Integrity. As they begin to, a force of magi from the Mechanicus (machine cult of Mars) shows up, demanding they stop and manually clear the hulk so that it can be stripped of valuable ancient technology.

While the Ultramarines can (and often are) accused of being the go-to generic Space Marine model, the Novamarines are a bit more "cultural" in that they make permanent bodily record of their heroic deeds, tattooing their flesh with their battle actions so that when they die the Emperor of Mankind can judge them worthy enough to be in his army for the final battle. They also have an entire mountain range on their homeworld they are carving the interior from, transforming it into a fortress and site to honor every single fallen Marine. On top of that, they commune with the departed for guidance.

On the other side, their cousins the Blood Drinkers come across as vampiric in more ways than one: they are incredibly handsome, have prominent fangs, have a keen interest in blood ("Sanguinary Master" is a critical role for their Chapter), and turn into ferocious warriors in battle, preferring close-quarters fighting. As the novel progresses, you learn many troubling things about them that only profoundly deepens the Chapter, though some of it (namely their genetic flaws and the Black Rage that drives them to wanton slaughter) comes as no surprise if you know anything about their parent Legion, the Blood Angels. Still, this particular Chapter has a great and tragic history to it that really must be read.

Regarding the Adeptus Mechanicus of Mars, not much other than their arrogance and technological prowess (and, early on, their jealousy and penchant for deceit) is expressed to the reader; better development of their characters and beliefs is shown much later in the novel. I suppose this is partly because the Mechanicus was the focus of an entire Horus Heresy novel ("Mechanicus" is the title), but with all the focus on the Marines' clearing of the hulk and the suffering of the one Chapter, not much time could really be spent on the Machine Cult without stretching things a bit.

As for the hulk, it's something else. Just having a space station or moon base or derelict ship isn't enough: in Warhammer 40,000, you go ultra-big or not at all. A space hulk can grow to insanely huge proportions (the Death of Integrity weighs an estimated 37.9 trillion tons), made up of various debris, ships of every kind, asteroid, just about anything. It can also house a massive army, in this case the alien species known as the tyranids, specifically their genestealer forms.

The effort of killing hundreds of genestealers alone makes for a terrific read, but what awaits the Marines and Mechanicus at the heart of the hulk is what readers will truly be stunned and awed by. I did not see any of the final twists coming, even with the hints author Guy Haley dropped along the way.

Overall, Death of Integrity lives up to its ominous name. It stars a cast of heroes tasked with increasingly bad situations to overcome, already burdened by tremendous weights, and when they learn just what it is they are fighting and fighting for, they are left shaken at best and broken at worst. Not everyone fails to make it out, but those who do may wish they hadn't.

Highly recommend.

(Oh, and in case you're wondering, the figure on the front is Blood Drinkers Chapter Master Caedis, as he is made to look later in the book).

BlueJaySF
05-04-2015, 04:04 PM
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/NIM3DFG4D8_1EF58B.jpg


Seriously, the only thing that big is an Imperator Titan, unless they're suddenly putting out to-scale strike cruisers with inexplicable landing gear that look like mech-feet.

BlueJaySF
05-11-2015, 04:03 PM
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/GRN5FDGH5F_DGH6H59E.jpg


Okay, looks like I was going down the wrong track. Probably a large-scale display-only battle-automata, like what they've been advertising for the Mechanicus forces recently. The face doesn't resemble any Knight models I've seen.

Damian
05-15-2015, 09:32 AM
That is absolutely gorgeous

BlueJaySF
05-15-2015, 10:46 PM
Ugh, was half-right the first time: it's a Warlord Titan; GW just sent out today a newsletter (or rather Forge World did) and therein they preview it and some other stuff, one such being a Guilliman model. I might have to get him, because as generic/standard as the Ultramarines are, they're still impressive as soldiers and an empire unto themselves, and they have some damn good models.

BlueJaySF
05-20-2015, 05:20 PM
Some shots from Warhammer World's grand opening (and yes, that is an in-flight Apocalypse missile in the one shot):


http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/SAW6DRS_D54D60A.jpg

http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/SAW564_D4IUYD60B.jpg

http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/SAW6DF4S_6SDF4G60F.jpg

http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/SAW45IHB64_OI5J60C.jpg

http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/SAW6HJ4S_654G60E.jpg

http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/SAW54DFS_6ASD4G60G.jpg

BlueJaySF
05-24-2015, 02:18 PM
Finished Fear to Tread (James Swallow) last night.


Coming from someone who did not particularly like Sanguinius or the Blood Angels Legion, I went into this book with only my great liking of the author's storytelling skills to drive me along.

James Swallow did not fail to impress me again.

The story starts off with a critical partnership, Sanguinius and his Blood Angels teaming up with Horus Lupercal and his Luna Wolves to defeat a race of aliens and liberate their followers. From there, we learn a dark and horrific secret of the Blood Angels, but so does Horus, and many years later after he has been corrupted to the service of Chaos, the Warmaster uses this hidden truth to test the Blood Angels as never before. That test is the majority of the story, a mission from Horus for Sanguinius and his sons to eradicate the last surviving aliens they'd once defeated, who have allegedly taken over a far-off star system.

But when the Blood Angels arrive, they find almost no trace of human or alien at all, only world after world slaughtered of all life, and the trap around them is then sprung.

At roughly five hundred pages, Fear to Tread covers a substantial amount of ground, detailing a huge roster of characters as they attempt to make sense of a dead cluster of worlds. Because this is the start of the Horus Heresy (yes, this is book 21 in the saga, but it is early in the timeline), and because of how the Imperial Truth and the Emperor shun all religion and superstition, the idea of demons (in this franchise called "daemons" ) is totally unacceptable, and magic/sorcery worthy only of dismissal. As such, the majority of the characters refuse to believe that evil spirits and not aliens have butchered entire worlds, even when an entire city literally comes alive to fight them.

And there is plenty of fighting to be had. The last time I read Swallow, it was book four of the saga, The Flight of the Eisenstein, and he has outdone himself this time around. In Flight, the Death Guard only had one big battle as loyalists before the Horus Heresy began, but the Blood Angels are given two: one against the nephilim (the aliens I mentioned previously) and another against the orkz. In the second one, you are introduced to a pivotal character, Kano, who possesses psychic powers, and see how important psykers are to the Imperium especially in the face of daemons (though this effect is only realized later in the timeline and book).

Conversely, an element present in Flight but not in Fear is the angle of the cult that worships the Emperor as a living god. Far be it to repeat and rehash plot elements, which is why I think Swallow did not include that angle here aside from a small nod late in the book, which keen-eyed readers will immediately pick up.

While the meat of the story is about a force of Space Marines encountering and doing battle against demons, the spirit of the story is actually about trust and betrayal. Horus, manipulating events to his liking that he may murder his own father, preys upon the trust of his closest brother and sends him on a suicide mission that he intends will either kill or corrupt well over a hundred thousand men. Sanguinius, believing the best of his brother and not flinching in the face of duty, finds everything he believed in is false and must forge ahead for the sake of the Imperium. In the end, the fate of the galaxy in its entirety is changed by the changes of ideology and allegiance experienced by a handful of its denizens.

If you want a primer for the Heresy and an introduction to the Warhammer 40,000 universe, or just want a book about Space Marines fighting hideous monsters, do yourself a favor and pick this novel up. You will not regret it.

BlueJaySF
05-26-2015, 04:34 PM
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/News/FORGE_WORLD_BULLETIN_61.html

Sigismund and that Daemon Engine look helluva good. And that battleground!

BlueJaySF
05-29-2015, 10:15 PM
So I'm thinking of making a harshly satirical custom figure of Justin Bieber.

The general idea is a Slaanesh-themed version of him that's also fairly accurate to him in real life (as in, looks like him, but has Slaanesh iconography on a banner or something). I can save myself a bit of trouble because I know he doesn't use a guitar, but that means I'll have to find a hand/arm that's gripping a pole that I can cut down and top off with a little nub so that it's a microphone.

Planning to have a wounded Space Marine crawling away from him with bolter drawn, but not sure what Legion/Chapter he should be from (needs to be a Loyalist Legion or Chapter, definitely; maybe Imperial Fists or Black Templars?). Going to need a larger base for him, possibly with some rubble or something to suggest a battlefield.

Any suggestions on which model and bits I should use will be appreciated.

Also, probably going to make some Carcharodon figures, just a handful, since I love sharks and these dudes have a cool scheme.

TeenageAngst
05-29-2015, 10:26 PM
I don't get the Justin Bieber hate. He didn't even appear on my radar until he was banging Brazilian supermodels and street racing Lamborghinis.

BlueJaySF
05-31-2015, 11:34 AM
Finished Wrath of Iron.

Wrath of Iron makes a good case for the Iron Hands being a likeable Legion. With their focus on being more machine than man, holding a general disgust for mortal flesh and working in such utter lockstep that they may as well be drones, it can be hard to find much within them to sympathize.

Chris Wraight does a good job of exploring the Iron Hands, looking at how they are viewed as incredibly ruthless and with an utter disregard for the casualties suffered by their allies. They know they are monstrous, but firmly believe that they do these things because they must, that it is their duty to do the worst fighting because they are the only ones who can.

At the same time, Wraight looks at the Legion's allies, specifically General Nethata, who constantly raises issue with the losses his men suffer and how Rauth, the Iron Hands commander, refuses to give him rhyme or reason, always pushing for more attacks and never lending any of his Space Marines to aid the Imperial Guard. Those readers with backgrounds of authority, especially military officers who had to send subordinates into hazardous situations, can connect with Nethata's reluctance to sacrifice his troops for no clear reason; it's hard to march someone to their death for something you don't understand.

The villains they face are their oldest and deadliest foes, at first traitors believing their cause just, and then bizarre mutants, and finally the twisted and endless daemons of Chaos itself. And through it all, in spite of the misguided beliefs or freakish bodies or horrific monsters, the Iron Hands push onward, an unceasing and merciless tide of steel and willpower.

Overall, I found the book to be quite likeable, especially for a Legion that is difficult to make sympathetic to the reader (the opening pages, relating an insight into the Legion's primarch Ferrus Manus's thoughts towards his sons, goes a long way to drawing you in). While I didn't love this the way I loved Death of Integrity (a must read for any sci-fi fans), this is a solid and touching novel, at times saddening, at times astonishing, but very much memorable.

BlueJaySF
06-01-2015, 06:00 PM
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/UIL045Y7_15SF4362H.jpg


http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/UIL0654GF7_15YGT262B.jpg


I have to get some Myrmidon Secutors for my custom Death Guard collection now.

BlueJaySF
06-06-2015, 11:02 AM
Just received a big order containing a number of things, some of which are needed for my Slaanesh Champion Justin Bieber:

Blood Angels Terminator Assault head, bare (mop-hair Bieber)
Slaanesh standard (Bieber)
Phoenix Guard halberds
100 purity seals
Grey Knights Terminator daemon skulls

Yesterday I had gotten six Chaos Space Marine Terminator heads and ten Dark Elf Dreadspears swords.

Going to need to hunt up a bigger base for Chaos Bieber, a scenic one with some rubble. Also going to need to figure out which legs he'll have.

BlueJaySF
06-08-2015, 04:07 PM
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/DSC_0074.jpg

Chaos Knight Paladin supposedly soon to go into production.

BlueJaySF
06-15-2015, 08:56 AM
http://admin.gamesworkshop.tradeitlive.com/Images/FW/Blogs/AMX4G45F2_12EF0F64Csm.jpg


Supposedly a new Horus Heresy Character Series model, and judging by the mutation and ruined armor I'd saw either a Slaanesh or Nurgle agent.

BlueJaySF
06-29-2015, 06:38 PM
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/IFL34DF4_F43FDS66A.jpg

TeenageAngst
07-07-2015, 11:17 AM
Stolen from dakkadakka:

http://i.imgur.com/3ozOFlY.png

I should have known something was fishy when GeeDubs was giving these warscrolls away for free. Rage-inducing as this is, it's entirely moot when you realize there's no army lists anymore. You can just keep slapping plastic on the table until you get bored, so things like rerolls are pointless. Any and all balance and competition is gone. I'm honestly surprised there's not a rule about slapping your opponent in the face with a fish or flushing your plastic miniatures down the toilet.

Edit: This is also a thing:

http://natfka.blogspot.com/2015/07/gw-answers-age-of-sigmar-questions.html

Apparently GW did this just to fuck with the established playerbase. Because it's good to show contempt for your fans and consumers. Honest to Christ I'm surprised they're not hiring people to murder WHFB players in the street at this point. It'd be less insulting if they started packing black dildos in all their fantasy model kits.

BlueJaySF
07-20-2015, 04:40 PM
Finished reading The Damnation of Pythos (Horus Heresy novel #31), I'll give a full review of that later.

Anyway, here are some model shots (including the winner) from the Forge World Open Day 2015 painting competition.


Imperial Fists Sicaran Battle Tank
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/VAM6DBGN6_114H469I.jpg


Praetor
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/VAM6D65GG6_11DH469H.jpg


Armillus Dynat
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/VAM65G6_11DFGD69F.jpg


Sons of Horus Sicaran Battle Tank
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/VAM6DFGG6_11DKID69G.jpg


Death Guard Legion Fellblade (winning entry)
http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Images/FW/Blogs/VAM6LI6_116J469J.jpg



Personally, I'm very glad the XIV won, because the Pre-Heresy Death Guard are my favorite Legion. Out of those listed entries, I'd have picked the Praetor as second place, because the job on him is amazing.



edit:

Damnation of Pythos review:

Overall, it was pretty good. Annandale is very good with battle descriptions, with some grisly clashes between members of the Raven Guard, Iron Hands, and Salamanders versus the wildlife of the planet Pythos (mostly dinosaur-like creatures, though the forest literally comes alive to attack them at one point).

That touches upon part of the underlying genre of the book: it's not so much science-fantasy as it is science-fantasy/horror. The planet in its entirety is the Legionnaries' enemy, from the animals (all of which are predatory, not a grass-muncher anywhere) to the forest; even the night air is working against them.

As the book is primarily from the viewpoint of the Iron Hands' Sergeant Galba and his serf Jerune Kanshell, the idea of anything outside of the real world is unacceptable: there is no such thing as magic, nor gods, nor the divine or infernal. When they encounter something they don't fully understand, they write it off as a xenos (alien) issue or something from the warp (alternate dimension, the Immaterium, in which daemons reside, though the Legions largely at this point don't accept that daemons are real).

This "only the real" ideology finds its focal point in Iron Hands Captain Atticus, who is a brutally strict and efficient commander. He tolerates no deviation from his orders because that interferes with the efficiency of the Legion's war efforts, and the Iron Hands are nothing if not systematic in their efficiency.

Pinch-hitting from the other corner (on the heroic side, anyway) are Ptero of the Raven Guard and Khi'dem of the Salamanders. The pair are generally given the cold shoulder by Atticus and a number of the other Iron Hands due to their not charging to Ferrus Manus's aid during the Drop Site Massacre of Isstvan V (detailed in the novel Fulgrim). The loss of the Iron Hands' primarch leaves a bitter wound in his Legion and some view the two other Legions as somewhat responsible, and so Ptero and Khi'dem must deal with a degree of loathing from their cousins. As the story progresses and Atticus commits certain actions with certain claims of validation, we see things from their perspective and how they see folly where he sees wisdom.

It should be noted that although there is a good deal of characterization, it's hard to swallow. Annandale isn't a bad writer by any means, but it can be profoundly difficult to write the Iron Hands in a way that connects them to the reader due to how cold and almost anti-human they can be, embracing the mechanical and shunning the flesh. Chris Wraight's "Wrath of Iron" novel has a bit of the same problem, though I think Wraight did a better job owing to not having to write horror elements into the story, though by no means are those poorly done. The closest the Legion comes to being human (other than a few of the serfs, such as Kanshell and his fellow serf Tanaura) is through Galba, who has not yet converted himself so much as others to a mechanical form. Through Galba we get a meeting ground of the flesh and the machine, especially as he tries to describe his interpretation of Pythos to Atticus.

There is a heavy element of mystery throughout the novel, to discover the secrets of Pythos and of the pilgrim fleet that the Iron Hands encounter there later on. While much is revealed by the story's end, not everything is concluded (the Space Marines Battles novel "Pandorax" touches upon some leftover threads, for one), leaving as many questions as there are answers.

This is not a bad book by any stretch of the word, go into Damnation with a grain of salt. The Iron Hands are tricky to be sympathetic towards, and Annandale has a time balancing clashing ideologies (machine vs flesh) and genres (mystery, military action, science-fantasy, and horror), and the ending will feel like a vicious cliffhanger, but overall this is worth picking up for rare insight into the twilight days of a legendary army.

WolfNightV4X1
08-21-2015, 09:33 AM
Someone tell me about tabletop...I've always thought to play Dungeons and Dragons when I first heard the concept in my youth, but clearly there are other brands of RPG such as Pathfinder and Warhammer...I'm too old now not to have tried it once at this point.

When did you guys first try? Explain to me how such a pastime works...I am intrigued by the max level nerdness that befalls this certain activity :V

TeenageAngst
08-26-2015, 12:01 AM
Warhammer isn't an RPG unless you're talking about the Rogue Trader or Dark Heresy RPG spinoffs. It's a miniature wargame. The difference is, with the exception of some damnable Age of Sigmar rules, you're never expected to act "in character" or even roleplay at all in Warhammer. Also 40k is about $400+ more expensive to get started in than D&D and you're gonna have a miserable time justifying the hobby to yourself if you don't like sitting down with expensive paints and brushes and crafting each and every little soldier into your own personal army. Meanwhile you can get started in Pathfinder or D&D for the cost of a used rulebook and maybe a Reaper Bones miniature for $5.

Getting started in D&D for me was really fluid. Someone said they wanted to get a group going among my circle of friends, I'd seen it before and it looked cool, so I was like "yeah okay!" I started in 4th edition and almost immediately jumped ship to Pathfinder. D&D 5e is okay, it's definitely better than 4e, but see if you can find a group that uses the 3.5e or Pathfinder rules instead, they're much deeper and more enjoyable. Alternatively if you've never played at all before, look for Pathfinder Society or D&D Encounters games near where you are through the publisher's websites. They're essentially pickup groups every week at a game store, and everyone is helpful in getting going.

Getting started in Warhammer 40k was like having someone shove their dick in my wallet. First you have to see how the game is played, then you have to buy your own army. The army must come before you actually start playing and thus before you have a firm grasp of the gameplay of each army (they are all very different). You can go off strategies other people use, you can take recommendations, but what the person at the game shop told me to do was just pick the one that looks the coolest because you're going to be staring at it for a long, long time. I personally went with a Dark Eldar army and have no regrets.

Now that you have your army picked out based entirely on window shopping, it's time to spend some money. First you need models. At least 1 HQ unit and 2 Troops units are need for a standard formation with everything else being optional but highly recommended. A Battleforce, that is, a boxed set of lots of dudes, will usually get you going, and that's what I did. Alternatively if you want to go balls deep right away you can dish out $400 for an ebay army that'll get you to tournament levels of play right off the bat, questionable paint jobs and all. Most HQ units are sold as ludicrously expensive resin models which are about as beginner friendly as playing a classical guitar so I do highly recommend buying an older pewter HQ for whatever army you're getting off ebay. It costs less, it probably looks cooler, and you don't have to worry about it shattering because it got knocked off the table.

Next you're gonna need paints and modeling gear. No one wants to field an army of little grey plastic men and no one wants to play against a guy who hasn't even bothered lifting a brush. J/K if you're new people don't care they'll be too busy pounding you into space debris. Super glue, plastic glue, and a hobby knife are about all you really need to put together most mans. P3 spray primer is a must for painting too. It's cheap, it's good, and it's sold in almost any hobby store. Citadel paints are expensive but they are really, really high quality. Vallejo also makes good paint but unlike Citadel their stuff isn't broken down into specific functions, so the paint consistency will vary from color to color almost at random. You're also gonna want to watch about 100 hours of videos on how to paint so you have some idea what you're going for, then spend about 100 hours more crying because your little plastic soldiers don't look as awesome as the stuff you see on Dakka Dakka. Eventually though you'll have your army list done, your models will be mostly assembled and probably primed hand half-painted, and you'll be ready to start slinging dice. Then you'll realize that all the work you put in is meaningless because the guy with 3 half-modeled Raiders full of almost-assembled Wraithguard sporting Strength D AP2 flamers will table your entire army in 3 turns. Then you'll run to /tg/ to bitch and beg for people to help you up your cheese game.

And then you'll be a 40k player.

Albino Axolotl
08-26-2015, 10:45 PM
Lizardmen don't give a f**k!