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Vae
04-13-2014, 01:15 PM
I want to know if there exists some kind of program, or online thing, or something, to test my monitor's brightness and colors and such against what is "normal" or "standard" for most people.

I was satisfied with my old laptop's monitor, but I think the one on my fiance's (which has now become mine) has a very skewed brightness or contrast to it. More than a few people have told me that some of my drawings are dark and muddy without ambient lighting, when they have, in fact, looked fine... on my computer. You can see the major issue here, as an artist, and especially as an artist that likes to work with dark colors.

Is there any way to accomplish this without using a different physical monitor, for comparison?
I may be able to get my hands on one, but I would like to know what my options are.

Runefox
04-13-2014, 01:23 PM
Not really, no. The only thing that will 100% work without question is a colorimeter like a Spyder4 (http://spyder.datacolor.com/portfolio-view/spyder4express/), but they're pricey even at the low end. Without another monitor to "eyeball" it from, it's impossible to make adjustments that will be accurate enough that you won't have that problem. Really, if the colorimeter is out, the best thing to do is to open up Windows' calibration interface (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/calibrate-your-display) on the monitor in question and a different one that looks "right" (preferably calibrated but beggars can't be choosers) and see if you can eyeball the adjustments. The Windows calibration tool will work to a degree, but it's impossible to tell whether or not the end result is accurate if you just use it on its own.

Tiido
04-19-2014, 01:58 PM
I got a decent image out my laptop with the help of this site :

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

I could also mostly equalize the image of my various monitors. Monitors with different backlight technologies or variations of a particular tech are so much pain...

AshleyAshes
04-19-2014, 02:23 PM
The 'real' tools for monitor calibration aren't really needed for the end user. They're for people doing color correction in film and television or other precise work where it has to look the same on every calibrated screen.

For a personal display, you're good to just get it to the settings that you 'like' and look good for you.

lorenith
04-21-2014, 05:48 PM
The 'real' tools for monitor calibration aren't really needed for the end user. They're for people doing color correction in film and television or other precise work where it has to look the same on every calibrated screen.

For a personal display, you're good to just get it to the settings that you 'like' and look good for you.

A monitor that is off by too much can really mess up an artists coloring and shading, so Vae and any other artist (particularly one who plans on printing and such) has a good reason to want to calibrate their monitor, or at least get it close to displaying proper color/brightness/contrast

Although, last I heard and it's been stated in this thread it's pretty expensive to get the (software?) to do that.

Runefox
04-21-2014, 11:09 PM
Although, last I heard and it's been stated in this thread it's pretty expensive to get the (software?) to do that.

Hardware. So it's a bit of an investment, for sure. Not everyone needs it, but artists in particular, especially artists having this problem, can benefit tremendously from it.

QT Melon
04-22-2014, 10:15 PM
I am currently using a Colormunki to calibrate my monitors because my old Spyder wouldn't work on multiple monitors. I noticed that each of them have their own quirks and still lean to one color spectrum over another. Colurmunki was leaning towards a green, while Spyder more red. I do have a color passport and other tools to help with teaks as well.