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ShadWolf
01-25-2014, 03:59 PM
I was just looking over the other computer threads and it got me wanting to make topic on computer build recommendations, I'd love to hear what people would recommend following a specific set of things that the computer will perform well in.

I'll break it down into different categories then you post your recommendations for those categories.


Gaming Build [Medium-end]
Gaming Build [High-end]
Budget Build [medium to high-end]
Graphics and Media Build
Basic Server Build
Media and Streaming Server Build
Multipurpose Server Build (Streaming, backups, hosting games, etc)


Don't have to include OS's on your build recommendations, but will be nice to know what plays nice on each of your own recommending builds. You can also recommend your additional features like cooling systems and such. This is just a collection survey really on what people recommend.

Nightpaws
01-28-2014, 06:47 AM
Gaming Build [Medium/High-end]
- Windows 7 Professional x64
- 8GB Corsair 1600MHz DDR3 RAM
- SanDisk 120GB SSD SATA III
- Western Digital Caviar Green 1TB SATA III
- Asus HD 7870 AMD Graphics Card
- Asus P8Z77-V LX Motherboard
- 1024MB Intel HD Graphics 4000 integrated graphics
- 3.5GHz Intel Quad Core i7 3rd Gen 3770K
- HAF X USB 3.0 XL ATX Chassis
- LG 1080p TV/Display combo
- BluRay Drive, DVD+RW, WiFi, Drawing Tablet and video capture


This is my current PC loadout and it runs well and fairly cool with most games due to the compact components and large, well ventilated chassis.

I would suggest the larger version of my Motherboard though as the current one is too small and has too few connectors to attach the front fan. It plays most recent games in high quality, the chassis has plenty of space to add more hard drives for larger games. And the motherboards support up to 32GB DDR3 RAM.

You can probably get the new gen i5 with similar specs to my 3rd gen i7.

TeenageAngst
01-28-2014, 11:57 AM
It's been a while since I've built a PC (something like 3-4 years) but like most things it depends what you want to use it for. Also we need a budget to even come close to doing this right.

If you don't care how large/loud your rig is, then obviously you could be looking at used car money for a high end system. If you want just a normal gaming PC, about $700-1,200 will do ya for a standard ATX build. If you're looking at noiseless construction, overclocking, or a microATX build, then we're getting into witchcraft.

Here are some rules of thumb, at least from back in the day when I was building my rig:

- If you're not overclocking very much you'll be fine with just an air-cooled case. As long as you have your fans going with a cross intake/exhaust you're fine.

- AMD is for budget, Intel is for horsepower. AMD chips usually have more cores for lower prices so they're good at doing lots of relatively lightweight stuff at once. Intel chips are more expensive and are usually quadcore, not hexcore in their lower price ranges, however they're more efficient and good for intensive single applications. It all depends what you're doing.

- Maybe I'm weird but I still like using a soundcard with my system, motherboard sound still uses system resources.

- Don't go cheap on your video card. Getting one or two $180 cards (Radeons are nice ones now in this price bracket) is well worth the money if you plan on using multiple monitors or want decent FPS on a 1080p monitor.

- If you have the money, go with 5 HDDs. That's 1 SSD for insta-boot, and 4 normal drives hooked up in RAID 0+1 for speed and redundancy.

ShadWolf
01-28-2014, 01:52 PM
It's been a while since I've built a PC (something like 3-4 years) but like most things it depends what you want to use it for. Also we need a budget to even come close to doing this right.

If you don't care how large/loud your rig is, then obviously you could be looking at used car money for a high end system. If you want just a normal gaming PC, about $700-1,200 will do ya for a standard ATX build. If you're looking at noiseless construction, overclocking, or a microATX build, then we're getting into witchcraft.

Here are some rules of thumb, at least from back in the day when I was building my rig:

- If you're not overclocking very much you'll be fine with just an air-cooled case. As long as you have your fans going with a cross intake/exhaust you're fine.

- AMD is for budget, Intel is for horsepower. AMD chips usually have more cores for lower prices so they're good at doing lots of relatively lightweight stuff at once. Intel chips are more expensive and are usually quadcore, not hexcore in their lower price ranges, however they're more efficient and good for intensive single applications. It all depends what you're doing.

- Maybe I'm weird but I still like using a soundcard with my system, motherboard sound still uses system resources.

- Don't go cheap on your video card. Getting one or two $180 cards (Radeons are nice ones now in this price bracket) is well worth the money if you plan on using multiple monitors or want decent FPS on a 1080p monitor.

- If you have the money, go with 5 HDDs. That's 1 SSD for insta-boot, and 4 normal drives hooked up in RAID 0+1 for speed and redundancy.

I have seen few people use foam padding inside their computers to dampen the sounds from the fans, not really sure if that's logical way of doing things, since they're bound to heat up the foam padding overtime which might turn into a fire hazzard.

Sometimes the onboard sound cards on the motherboards are okay to use just as they are without the need of adding a soundcard, unless you are looking to hook up a huge digital surround sound system. But even there you could just as easily do that with the onboard sound, some even come with Optic Out for audio systems that have/use it.

Setting up boot partitions separate from everything else it pretty smart thing to do these days, SSD 's pretty useful for that, a 60gb SSD would do just fine if you plan to do dual boot, both boot partitions will be separate of course when setup correctly. As for 4 other drives hmm… 2 large SSD's for main stuff would be pretty decent enough for storing things on and all files etc… As for RAID volumes, depending on how many SATA ports there are I'd setup with 3-5 HDD's and doing RAID 0+1, RAID 5, 6 and 10.

Runefox
01-28-2014, 02:43 PM
- AMD is for budget, Intel is for horsepower. AMD chips usually have more cores for lower prices so they're good at doing lots of relatively lightweight stuff at once. Intel chips are more expensive and are usually quadcore, not hexcore in their lower price ranges, however they're more efficient and good for intensive single applications. It all depends what you're doing.

This isn't really true. Logically you'd think so, but AMD lies about the number of cores they have in their processors; You can take their claimed number and divide it by two. AMD's processors since Bulldozer have been made up of what they call modules - 1 floating point unit and two integer units per module. Since integer math is primarily useless for compression, multimedia, gaming, and other more strenuous tasks, the only real benefit to this kind of setup is in general computing and OS tasks. In fact, in most usage (but in particular gaming), a dual core i3 with hyperthreading can and will outperform a "hex-core" AMD FX, since it can process four floating point instructions at once (albeit slower than a true quad core like an Intel i5 or AMD FX "octa-core").

Of course, they have to use something to get people to buy their processors... They've also been touting their clock speed lately, which is hilarious considering they were lambasting Intel for doing exactly that during the P3-P4 era and as has long since been proven, clock speed means nothing when comparing processors of different architectures.

TeenageAngst
01-28-2014, 04:47 PM
That's sneaky, but something I would expect from AMD. See, I'm running a Phenom II hexcore so afaik it actually has 6 cores, unless this tomfoolery goes even further back than Bulldozer.

AshleyAshes
01-28-2014, 06:01 PM
That's sneaky, but something I would expect from AMD. See, I'm running a Phenom II hexcore so afaik it actually has 6 cores, unless this tomfoolery goes even further back than Bulldozer.

No, it doesn't, the Phenom II's STARS architecture isn't like that. That said, an Intel quad core could womp it. Sadly, dollar for dollar, work for work, AMD CPUs are pretty aweful compared to Intel ones. The exception to this is their APUs, which mix in LOVELY graphics that make the entire 'package' vastly superior to Intel's, assuming you're not going for discrete graphics.

For a scary example, my 3ghz quad core AMD server (Basically a 3ghz Phenom II x4) is inferior to my 2ghz quad core Intel laptop in terms of just CPU based workloads like rendering computer graphics for Cinema 4D. :X

TeenageAngst
01-28-2014, 07:30 PM
I find that hard to swallow since an AMD server is pulling something like 400w and an Intel mobile chip is operating off a 6 cell battery.

Runefox
01-28-2014, 07:40 PM
I find that hard to swallow since an AMD server is pulling something like 400w and an Intel mobile chip is operating off a 6 cell battery.

The gap sadly doesn't close much on the desktop chip front either; AMD's chips are routinely 140W+ TDP, while even the top Intel Haswells are 84W (i7-4770K); Lower end Intel i3's run at 54W, and the 4130T low-power runs 35W. The top-end AMD FX 9590 runs 220W and can't keep up. Hell, the biggest and baddest Xeons Intel has right now pull 130W.

That said, yes, the 6-core Phenoms prior to Bulldozer are pure 6-core CPU's.

AshleyAshes
01-28-2014, 07:59 PM
I find that hard to swallow since an AMD server is pulling something like 400w and an Intel mobile chip is operating off a 6 cell battery.

The power source isn't going to make a difference in performance. The AMD runs 3ghz on all four cores (A8-3870K to be specific, it's an APU but it's design is a STARS architecture quad core with Radeon graphics bolted on, minus the GPU, it's a Phenom II x4 3ghz.) The STARS architecture is shit old where as my laptop is a much newer Sandy Bridge chip. It has more cache than the AMD, much newer more efficient designs, and does a lot more work per clock. The results frankly aren't that surprising at all. That all said, even AMD doesn't make STARS based chips anymore at all, it was a pretty dated design even when it was in an APU.

Runefox
01-28-2014, 08:03 PM
I'm sorry, but all I can think of when I hear STARS is

http://static3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100410000514/villains/images/1/1a/Resident-evil-nemesis2.jpg

AshleyAshes
01-28-2014, 08:34 PM
From here on out, I'll be using the alternate name 'K10'. D:

Runefox
03-05-2014, 04:48 AM
I figure I'll toss some of my builds up here, though it's kind of hard to keep it all up to date seeing as the pricing and available parts change all the time. At least the links to my saved parts lists will be static.

Anywho, pricing is in USD. Do keep in mind these are baselines for the systems only, and can be modified as desired to fit.

Console-style Budget Gaming
These builds do not come with an operating system and are designed with SteamOS in mind; A Windows 7 or 8 license costs $89 extra. Optical drives are omitted because they are absolutely unnecessary.


WiiU Killer (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/3XkE) Low-end
This build will manage "last-gen" console performance, running with low graphics quality settings at 1080p at anywhere between 30 and 60 frames per second.

CPU: Intel Celeron G1820 2.7GHz Dual-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/intel-cpu-bx80646g1820)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/msi-motherboard-h81mp33)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/patriot-memory-pv34g160c0rd)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-drive-st3500418as)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon R7 250 2GB Video Card (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/sapphire-video-card-1003682gl)
Case: Thermaltake VO545A1N2U ATX Mid Tower Case w/450W Power Supply (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/thermaltake-case-vo545a1n2u)

Total: $306.05


PS3 Killer (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/3fv5) Medium-low-end
This build will handle "current-gen" console performance, with medium-low graphics quality settings at 1080p at anywhere between 30 and 60 frames per second. (This would be more realistically an Xbox One killer considering that the PS4 is the more powerful of the current-gen consoles, however I'm aiming for price points in particular here)

CPU: Intel Pentium G3220 3.0GHz Dual-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/intel-cpu-bx80646g3220)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/msi-motherboard-h81mp33)
Memory: Kingston Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/kingston-memory-khx16c9b1bk28x)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-drive-st1000dm003)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750 1GB (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-video-card-gvn750oc1gi)
Case: Silverstone PS08B (Black) MicroATX Mid Tower Case (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/silverstone-case-ps08b)
Power Supply: Corsair 430W ATX12V (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-power-supply-cx430)

Total: $405.91


Xbox One Killer (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/35d3) Medium-end
This build will handle the top end of "current-gen" console performance, with medium graphics quality settings at 1080p at anywhere between 30 and 60 frames per second. This build is designed to be a small form factor box that wouldn't look too out of place under a television.

CPU: Intel Pentium G3420 3.2GHz Dual-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/intel-cpu-bx80646g3420)
Motherboard: MSI H81I Mini ITX LGA1150 Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/msi-motherboard-h81i)
Memory: Kingston Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/kingston-memory-khx16c9b1bk28x)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-drive-st1000dm003)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/evga-video-card-02gp43751kr)
Case: Silverstone SG06BB-LITE Mini ITX Desktop Case (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/silverstone-case-sg06bblite)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 300W 80+ Certified SFX Power Supply (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seasonic-power-supply-ss300sfd)

Total: $509.09

Conventional Gaming
These builds come with Windows and are designed around a more conventional gaming PC formula.


The Reasonable Gamer (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/3Xp3) Midrange
This build will handle medium-high settings on most games at 1080p. It's designed around budget-minded components, and like most of my builds is a microATX-based machine, meaning it will be smaller than a full-sized tower.

CPU: Intel Core i3-4130 3.4GHz Dual-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/intel-cpu-bx80646i34130)
Motherboard: Asus H81M-E Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/asus-motherboard-h81me)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/crucial-memory-bls2kit8g3d1609ds1s00)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-drive-st1000dm003)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/evga-video-card-02gp43753kr)
Case: Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/fractal-design-case-fdcacore1000usb3bl)
Power Supply: EVGA 600B 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/evga-power-supply-100b10600kr)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/microsoft-os-wn700615)

Total: $702.57


The All-Rounder (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/3XoD) Midrange
This build will handle medium-high settings on most games at 1080p. It's built around moderate components with good reliability, and like most of my builds is a microATX-based machine, meaning it will be smaller than a full-sized tower.

CPU: Intel Core i5-4440 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/intel-cpu-bx80646i54440)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87M-D3H 1.0 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-motherboard-gaz87md3h10)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/crucial-memory-bls2kit8g3d1609ds1s00)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-drive-st2000dm001)
Video Card: XFX Radeon R9 270X 2GB Video Card (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/xfx-video-card-r9270xcdfc)
Case: Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/fractal-design-case-fdcacore1000usb3bl)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seasonic-power-supply-s12ii620bronze)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/microsoft-os-wn700615)

Total: $943.48


The $2k (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/3XnL) High-end
This build will pretty much handle whatever you can throw at it; It's the quintessential "gaming PC's are too expensive" gaming PC without going overboard with a giant water cooling radiator or SLI/Crossfire and instead focusing on features (Thunderbolt and high-end audio) and creature comfort (the case is sound-insulated). It's a full-sized tower with good overclock potential.

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/intel-cpu-bx80646i74770k)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H90 94.0 CFM Liquid (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-cpu-cooler-h90)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD5 TH ATX LGA1150 Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-motherboard-gaz87xud5th)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2400 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gskill-memory-f32400c11d16gsr)
Storage: Seagate 600 Series 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-drive-st240hm000)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-drive-st3000dm001)
Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 290X 4GB Video Card (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/asus-video-card-r9290xdc2oc4gd5)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/fractal-design-case-fdcadefr4bl)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 850W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-power-supply-hx850)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/microsoft-os-wn700615)

Total: $2011.37

Home Theatre/HTPC
These builds are designed around the concept of creating a compact, stylish PC that can handle multimedia playback of all shapes and sizes.


General-purpose (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/2O0b) DVD, surround sound, dual HDMI out, and WiFi
This build is designed for style and price while remaining a great multimedia machine. Extremely compact, it should feel right at home in an entertainment centre, while playing CD's, DVD's, and any downloaded media you might have. If you're feeling particularly adventurous, you could forego Windows altogether for a full Linux HTPC setup and shave the price down to $400.

CPU: AMD A4-6300 3.7GHz Dual-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/amd-cpu-ad6300okhlbox)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-F2A88XN-WIFI Mini ITX FM2+ Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-motherboard-gaf2a88xnwifi)
Memory: Kingston Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/kingston-memory-khx16c9b1bk28x)
Storage: Western Digital WD Blue 1TB 2.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/western-digital-internal-hard-drive-wd10jpvx)
Case: Antec ISK 310-150 Mini ITX Desktop Case w/150W Power Supply (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/antec-case-isk310150)
Optical Drive: Samsung SN-208FB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/samsung-optical-drive-sn208fbbebe)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/microsoft-os-885370635690)

Total: $492.51


Full-Featured (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/3XpF) Blu-Ray, surround sound, dual HDMI out, dual HDMI in w/analog recording dongle and WiFi
This build is designed for maximum compatibility with your media, capable of reading CD's, DVD's, Blu-Ray, plus anything which can be connected via USB or over your network. It's designed to house the operating system on a small SSD and all your media on a large 3TB hard drive, with HDMI DVR to record TV and gameplay. With its higher-end APU, it can also handle light gaming.

CPU: AMD A10-6790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/amd-cpu-ad679kwohlbox)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-F2A88XN-WIFI Mini ITX FM2+ Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-motherboard-gaf2a88xnwifi)
Memory: Kingston Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/kingston-memory-khx16c9b1bk28x)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/crucial-internal-hard-drive-ct120m500ssd1)
Storage: Western Digital Red 3TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/western-digital-internal-hard-drive-wd30efrx)
Case: Silverstone SG08B-LITE Mini ITX Desktop Case (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/silverstone-case-sg08blite)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 430W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-power-supply-cx430m)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/microsoft-os-885370635690)
Other: Panasonic UJ265 Slim Slot-Loading BD-RW (http://www.amazon.com/UJ-265-Blu-ray-Burner-Interface-Laptop/dp/B00CFXZ9VA/ref=pd_sxp_grid_pt_2_0)
Other: Silverstone Tek Sleeved Slim-SATA to SATA Adapter Cable (CP10) (http://www.amazon.com/Silverstone-Tek-Sleeved-Slim-SATA-CP10/dp/B00A45JATI/ref=pd_bxgy_pc_img_y)
Other: AVerMedia AVerTV DarkCrystal HD DVR (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100049)

Total: $884.62

Servers
These builds are designed around functionality as a server machine. This usually entails support for a large number of hard drives, at least one gigabit ethernet controller for fast access, and adequate cooling. Servers can be used for a variety of tasks, including web/HTTP servers, file servers, media servers (DLNA/iTunes), and so on.


Energy-efficient mini-Server (http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Runefox/saved/40UX) Dual gigabit LAN, ultra-compact and low-power
This build focuses on the bare essentials and on saving space and money on electricity. Roughly the size of a Wii, at 90W, the power adapter draws less than some large laptops from the wall at peak, though the build itself runs at roughly 70W. Not quite as low as the Mac mini's claimed 11W, but with room for an internal hard drive and four rear USB 3.0 ports (and four more USB 2.0 ports at the front), this build is optimized for expansion despite its small package. Pop a Linux distro of your choice onto a USB flash drive to install and go nuts.

CPU: Intel Core i3-4130T 2.9GHz Dual-Core Processor (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/intel-cpu-bx80646i34130t)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Q87TN Thin Mini ITX LGA1150 Motherboard (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-motherboard-gaq87tn)
Memory: G.Skill 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gskill-memory-f312800cl9d8gbsq)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB mSATA Solid State Disk (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/crucial-internal-hard-drive-ct120m500ssd3)
Case: Antec ISK 110 VESA Mini ITX Desktop Case w/90W Power Supply (http://pcpartpicker.com/part/antec-case-isk110vesa)

Total: $499.91