PDA

View Full Version : Listening to/watching your own work?



Rory
01-22-2014, 06:37 PM
I was just kind of curious on how many musicians/producers listen to and/or watch their recorded work beyond initial production, for pleasure or other reasons? I realized that it might be an odd habit of mine to put my music on my playlists, so when I hear it and cringe at every mistake, maybe I'll remember to avoid them during my next practice... but I've also found that I actually enjoy some of the things I've done recently, and will listen to them just 'cus.

RainWizard
01-22-2014, 06:43 PM
I always listen to my own work, over and over again, because I find faults easier to pick out from a more outside perspective.

I tend to find, especially with lyrics, I much prefer going back after a few days and deciding then what needs changing. Rarely is a song perfect in one take.

zarya
01-22-2014, 06:50 PM
I convince myself I'm awful.

I will listen to it sometimes, but I always have this confidence issue where "Why do I try? This is terrible. I can't do this."
(It's reciprocated by people not listening either but *shrug* so it goes)

Namba
01-22-2014, 06:59 PM
I cringe lol. But other people assure me it's better than I think, so IDK.

Here's one I really can't stand lol (https://www.weasyl.com/submission/136344/dearly-beloved-bad-religion-cover)

Tiido
01-23-2014, 06:35 PM
I listen all my creations for days once they are done. I am so incredibly proud at those times haha

Rory
01-23-2014, 08:14 PM
I listen all my creations for days once they are done. I am so incredibly proud at those times haha

This is basically what happens for me, yeah. Minus the pride. Well, actually it starts out with pride, and then rapidly turns into a horrible sensation of "Oh my gosh, did I actually post this?! Who in their bloody right mind would like this?"

Thank you guys for the responses so far! It's cool to learn about other's quirks in this medium.

Namba
01-23-2014, 08:34 PM
It's funny because some people are like, "so what do you use for pitch correction?" Then I'm like: *raises eyebrows* "I don't. I record on tape."

The only enhancements I use are during mastering.

Tiido
01-23-2014, 08:44 PM
I am practicing singing myself, spectral analysis says I hit notes 90% of the time... but my vocal range is barely over an octave, and on the lower end - totally unsuitable for stuff I want to sing haha.

I have only had one tune I once posted and then later thought "that stuff is garbage"

Chesse20
01-23-2014, 08:58 PM
I like watching my own videos they are very funny at some times

PlayPossum
01-27-2014, 04:27 PM
I listen to everything I've produced but haven't scrapped (these remain in a separate folder).

I just publish what I'm somehow proud of, so it's not a problem at all, although it makes me cringe a bit knowing where are the minor flaws, places where I forgot to put a note or didn't know how to bridge...

I'll take Daft Punk as a nice example; their first album was kinda amateurish and you know they were exploring a lot. And that's why I specially like it, the songs are not so matured but show a bright, enjoyable side of exploration. This is a bit of what I feel with my own pieces.

JiJi
01-28-2014, 04:15 PM
I listen a lot. My new monitors expose everything so it's easier to spot mistakes to fix.
I hate anything I record by me because I am super harsh on my own recordings thinking I could do everything better, but now days I record others so its fun.
Still vocal and guitar tracks I do make me cringe, however my older stuff makes me worse so I'm slowly getting more satisfied with my newer work.

Term
02-03-2014, 06:01 AM
Time between production and review can often help in the self-review/criticism angle much as it does with other mediums.

I constantly look back at old productions, be them personal or professional that I worked on and try to find faults or other things that time and possibly greater experience has allowed me to discover. In some cases, I'll go back and re-cut something in order to see if things look better if done another way.

I often hear from anchors that they "can't stand listening to" themselves. Most of the reason why is because these people have spent countless hours reviewing shows they've hosted in order to improve themselves. They subject themselves to every mispronunciation, mumble, flub, lapse in concentration, slouch, or tick that ends up on camera and then attempt to rectify them for the next broadcast. Eventually they stop once they've developed a style all their own, but it takes a lot of self-improvement that can only be accomplished from watching themselves perform.

Greg
02-03-2014, 06:27 PM
I regret every single thing I release.

Rory
02-03-2014, 08:03 PM
Time between production and review can often help in the self-review/criticism angle much as it does with other mediums.

I constantly look back at old productions, be them personal or professional that I worked on and try to find faults or other things that time and possibly greater experience has allowed me to discover. In some cases, I'll go back and re-cut something in order to see if things look better if done another way.

I often hear from anchors that they "can't stand listening to" themselves. Most of the reason why is because these people have spent countless hours reviewing shows they've hosted in order to improve themselves. They subject themselves to every mispronunciation, mumble, flub, lapse in concentration, slouch, or tick that ends up on camera and then attempt to rectify them for the next broadcast. Eventually they stop once they've developed a style all their own, but it takes a lot of self-improvement that can only be accomplished from watching themselves perform.

Awesome, I was hoping to hear from a few non-musical perspectives too. That's some pretty cool insight as to how anchors improve themselves. A critical eye is always important, and it really is amazing to see the things you do out of habit without realizing. That's why I've really started to keep records of myself playing guitar, so I can see all the weird habits I picked up. Like, for instance, I notice that I forcibly scowl a lot when I'm playing, in concentration. It looks really goofy and is something that should probably be fixed.


I regret every single thing I release.

So what motivates you to keep releasing, then? You must be excited at some point, right? :c

JiJi
02-04-2014, 09:10 AM
I regret every single thing I release.

I feel like this with everything I do aha.

Greg
02-07-2014, 10:43 AM
So what motivates you to keep releasing, then? You must be excited at some point, right? :c
Anxiety's a tough thing to beat. I keep on releasing things because before I became a depresso espresso music was the thing that made me the most joyous. I go on the logical assumption that I'd have a better critique of myself if I weren't in such a mental rutt. I just sort of push myself constantly to do it. By the time a piece is overworked and released, I'm frustrated and exhausted. Satisfaction isn't really an option until I have the enrgy to feel more for my music.

I guess I keep going because I don't really enjoy anything anymore but on the rare occasion, when I hear things I was doing or listening to when I was feeling good, it takes me back. I guess I keep going because I hope that at the end of it all, I'll review my work and feel the sensations I did when I saw beauty in my music, when everything I heard or produced or performed made me get shivers, made me feel...
alive.

Rory
02-07-2014, 05:37 PM
Anxiety's a tough thing to beat. I keep on releasing things because before I became a depresso espresso music was the thing that made me the most joyous. I go on the logical assumption that I'd have a better critique of myself if I weren't in such a mental rutt. I just sort of push myself constantly to do it. By the time a piece is overworked and released, I'm frustrated and exhausted. Satisfaction isn't really an option until I have the enrgy to feel more for my music.

I guess I keep going because I don't really enjoy anything anymore but on the rare occasion, when I hear things I was doing or listening to when I was feeling good, it takes me back. I guess I keep going because I hope that at the end of it all, I'll review my work and feel the sensations I did when I saw beauty in my music, when everything I heard or produced or performed made me get shivers, made me feel...
alive.

Aw man, that blows. I totally empathize with you, it's one of the few outlets that I have to relieve anxiety. Recording has always stressed me out due to all the variables you have to control, including yourself not sucking and overcompensating. I actually noticed I scowl when I'm recording, but I don't when I'm just playing for myself.

Have you thought about just putting down recording for a long time, and just playing to play for yourself, then? I try not to record when I'm in my depressive moods, because it just comes out stiff, which just depresses me more that I can't even record right.

Sometimes you just need to do it, improvement or impressing other people be damned.

Tiido
02-08-2014, 10:40 AM
I do all my things for myself foremost, and then I'll see about all the otherns. Usually I am very häppy with what I have managed to create and off it goes to receive some extra exposure. Since I made it for myself and I'm happy I will not be bothered a single bit with negative comments whatever they may be, and if someone else likes that stuff it is only icing on the cake.

Hlavco
02-13-2014, 03:57 PM
Music-wise, I think that if somebody else had made the things I made, I wouldn't listen to them because they're not that great. But because I was the one that made them, I'm more connected with them and enjoy listening to them anyway. I guess it's like how somebody can drive the most boring car in the world, but perceive it as something special because they've grown accustomed to it. They know all the ins and outs of that particular car, and that makes them like it more than somebody else who is simply glancing at it in passing.

Python Blue
02-17-2014, 10:51 AM
Personally, I listen to my own work all the time. Even right now, I'm listening to my latest Weasyl submission. It certainly helps me find ways to remaster it later, for one.

Demensa
02-20-2014, 01:55 AM
I listen to my stuff fairly often, even though by the time I've finished producing, I've already heard it a million times.

However once I've decided it's ready to stop tweaking it, I usually listen a little less critically.
I'm actually pretty satisfied with what I create, even if I recognise how terrible the production quality is, or how repetitive the beat is in this particular section, etc.
Sometimes I just listen to old pieces simply for pleasure. That's a huge part of my motivation for writing music; it's the chance to specially tailor music to suit my listening preferences.
Listening to a finished piece as if it came from another artist is a huge reward.

Of course, if I go back more than about 2 years ago, I can't bear to listen to the poor quality... It's too cringeworthy to enjoy.

Also having other people around while listening to my music instantly makes me more critical of what I've done. It's mostly a general 'fear of failure' or 'what if they don't like it' thing, but it can make me really uncomfortable when I'm listening to my own music in the company of others.