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View Full Version : US govt wins Verizon case, additional net usage charges



cheawick
01-16-2014, 02:28 AM
I didn't even know this case existed until today! Verizon has now opened the doors for Internet providers to charge users more for content heavy access after we the people lost an appeals case. As much as I follow the news this surprised the heck outta me! =+{


http://business.time.com/2014/01/15.....ors_picks=true

QT Melon
01-16-2014, 02:32 AM
I didn't even know this case existed until today! Verizon has now opened the doors for Internet providers to charge users more for content heavy access after we the people lost an appeals case. As much as I follow the news this surprised the heck outta me! =+{


http://business.time.com/2014/01/15.....ors_picks=true

I think there's something with the URL because it says "not found"

http://business.time.com/2014/01/14/court-deals-a-blow-to-net-neutrality/ Might be what you're talking about?

Rory
01-16-2014, 02:41 AM
This sets up a very bad precedent, but is still deeply mired in the courts. I'm not too worried that the sky is falling yet, but I am thankful that the FCC is fighting to regulate these companies that will gut their customers without blinking.

QT Melon
01-16-2014, 11:24 AM
This sets up a very bad precedent, but is still deeply mired in the courts. I'm not too worried that the sky is falling yet, but I am thankful that the FCC is fighting to regulate these companies that will gut their customers without blinking.

It might not be the consumers, but the sites themselves. http://news.yahoo.com/isps-now-free-rein-gouge-netflix-thanks-net-150515904.html

In this scenario, they may be going to Netflix and making them pay a higher premium to be used on their lines.

Rory
01-16-2014, 02:27 PM
It might not be the consumers, but the sites themselves. http://news.yahoo.com/isps-now-free-rein-gouge-netflix-thanks-net-150515904.html

In this scenario, they may be going to Netflix and making them pay a higher premium to be used on their lines.

Ooh yeah, I realize that. You can kinda lump the companies in as customers though, because smaller companies who can't compete for the price of speed with giant corporations to deliver their data will get the shaft. Then on the consumers end, the biggest concern is the aggressive packet-shaping that would happen; want to torrent something, download massive files for legal cases, or stream at any reasonable speed? Not if your ISP has anything to say about it, they could throttle you as they pleased. The fix? They'll tell you to pony up some more of that hard earned cash for a "better" speed!

Then again, this is the same government who has given antitrust immunity to such "non-profit" corporations as the NFL, which gouges taxpayers from over half the country and then spits in their face with threats of television blackouts for not handing over even MORE money. But I digress, the FCC really needs to win this fight.

Runefox
01-16-2014, 04:33 PM
Oh great. Guess we can look forward to this now.

http://isen.com/blog/uploaded_images/5z6vt4n-720249.jpg

Because charging more for ones and zeroes on an openly accessible network makes so much fucking sense. This is like text messaging charges all over again in terms of anti-consumer bullshit, except on a much wider scale. I hope any ISP that implements this gets the consumer backlash it deserves. Here's hoping they all don't jump on the bandwagon.

Rilvor
01-16-2014, 08:53 PM
Oh great. Guess we can look forward to this now.

http://isen.com/blog/uploaded_images/5z6vt4n-720249.jpg

Because charging more for ones and zeroes on an openly accessible network makes so much fucking sense. This is like text messaging charges all over again in terms of anti-consumer bullshit, except on a much wider scale. I hope any ISP that implements this gets the consumer backlash it deserves. Here's hoping they all don't jump on the bandwagon.
If this happens, I'm almost certain the International Internet Song will be established as this. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBH4g_ua5es)

Runefox
01-16-2014, 10:15 PM
If this happens, I'm almost certain the International Internet Song will be established as this. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBH4g_ua5es)

Ohhhh nononono, that won't do. YouTube'll be metered out at $0.50/MB, that's like $2 for the whole song! I don't even want to calculate how much it'd be for 10 hours of it. It'll either have to be on a more obscure site or much less lengthy to work out.

Rory
01-16-2014, 10:21 PM
Ohhhh nononono, that won't do. YouTube'll be metered out at $0.50/MB, that's like $2 for the whole song! I don't even want to calculate how much it'd be for 10 hours of it. It'll either have to be on a more obscure site or much less lengthy to work out.

And Netflix would be double, at minimum. Quadruple for high def streaming! *groans* Please, someone go beat some sense into the appellate courts of the US.

cheawick
01-16-2014, 10:36 PM
Yes, same case, thanks for posting a working link.

Runefox
01-17-2014, 12:08 AM
And Netflix would be double, at minimum. Quadruple for high def streaming! *groans* Please, someone go beat some sense into the appellate courts of the US.

But HD streaming is bigger ones and zeroes! It makes sense! The tubes need to be flushed more often to clear them!

Rilvor
01-18-2014, 03:13 AM
But HD streaming is bigger ones and zeroes! It makes sense! The tubes need to be flushed more often to clear them!

You asked for this by saying that:

_cZC67wXUTs

Edit: As an aside, the FCC Chairman has vowed to fight this until the bitter end. It looks like they're trying to brainstorm a way around the ruling.

SirCoffeecup
01-18-2014, 11:49 AM
It seems like there's a maximum IQ level you can't go over if you want to make big and influential decisions. And that IQ cap ain't set high.
I'm not sure how much this will affect my internet, but it is still pretty darn stupid.
Over here they are working on banning fireplaces because of health hazards in the smoke..
I'm pretty sure the particles they mentioned come from factories, power plants and cars instead of the chimneys.

Runefox
01-18-2014, 12:03 PM
I'm pretty sure the particles they mentioned come from factories, power plants and cars instead of the chimneys.

But how can that be? Chimney smoke is visible! Car exhaust is invisible! Chimney smoke is obviously chock full of all kinds of terrible chemicals.

Rory
01-18-2014, 03:28 PM
But how can that be? Chimney smoke is visible! Car exhaust is invisible! Chimney smoke is obviously chock full of all kinds of terrible chemicals.

Quick! We have a genius here! Get them in public office immediately so they can start making the big, important decisions ASAP! This will definitely not come back to bite us in the rear, such logic is so flawless in its beauty.

/dying

Sparkzer
01-20-2014, 10:19 PM
This only happened because Verizon and some other big companies paid someone to rule it in their favor. Greed corrupts everything.

Runefox
01-20-2014, 10:55 PM
This only happened because Verizon and some other big companies paid someone to rule it in their favor. Greed corrupts everything.

This pretty much describes nearly all US politics that influence the private sector. Highest bidder wins.

Sammacha
01-21-2014, 03:31 AM
They will do anything for money, its not a surprise. It's sad though :(

Rory
01-21-2014, 03:35 AM
They will do anything for money, its not a surprise. It's sad though :(

The fight's not over until it's over. No question it was a setback, but the FCC will keep pushing to protect consumer rights. They have far from exhausted their legal recourse, so don't lose hope yet. I'd like to think our system isn't that corrupt yet.

FatalSyndrome
01-22-2014, 03:08 AM
This is true, yeah.

It's been worrying me but honestly people are not gonna let this happen. You can fuck with our texting and phone plans but you do not fuck with users and their internet! Hahaha.

Runefox
01-22-2014, 04:04 AM
So it begins. Not as you'd expect, but in one very egregious way: Cellular-style metered access and cellular-style pricing (http://www.communitynewspapergroup.com/independence_bulletin_journal/article_c89fcbba-7fbb-11e3-8843-001a4bcf887a.html).


At the present time price tiers at EBTC range from $24.95 for 5 gigabytes (equivalent to two downloaded, high-definition movies), to $299.95 for 100 gigabytes (GB) with overages priced at $5 per GB for 3Mbps (data transfer speed over the Internet. The U.S. average is 8.6 Mbps.)

Rory
01-22-2014, 04:17 AM
So it begins. Not as you'd expect, but in one very egregious way: Cellular-style metered access and cellular-style pricing (http://www.communitynewspapergroup.com/independence_bulletin_journal/article_c89fcbba-7fbb-11e3-8843-001a4bcf887a.html).

To be fair, this was implemented before the appellate court's ruling. Aside from that, this entire article reeks of local corruption. They're trying to gut their tiny customer base because they probably assume they aren't willing to fight back, and if they want internet... what other choice do they have?

Conduit
01-22-2014, 08:04 AM
That's an unfortunate precedent that other service providers might use to begin ramping up their own costs (especially here in Australia where internet costs a lot but is stunningly bad).

ShadWolf
01-22-2014, 11:05 AM
I think its a lot of nonsense for them to even THINK of even passing something as dumb as this shit right here. :/

Yet again… "We know best because we are government, and know whats best for everyone." ……NOPE!! …Don't just assume what you know. >:|

I really hate it when they try to pass something so dumb, trying to control the internet, if its not controlling the internet its putting stupid blocks and things in they way to make it more annoying. They just can't leave the Internet be, it doesn't need controlled regulations. I really hope FCC beat this back hard. Verizon is dumb to even think that as a business ISP to want to even propose adding extra costs based on sites users visit or do on the internet.

Bri Mercedes
01-22-2014, 01:55 PM
But how can that be? Chimney smoke is visible! Car exhaust is invisible! Chimney smoke is obviously chock full of all kinds of terrible chemicals.

Ban bonfires and fireworks and forest fires!

I can't see how hundreds of millions of internet users can be screwed over by just a couple big-money heads. Petition the crap out of them!

All the politicians and businessmen I've ever met are... strange. Like they aren't real people. I can't describe it.

Rory
01-22-2014, 03:15 PM
I think its a lot of nonsense for them to even THINK of even passing something as dumb as this shit right here. :/

Yet again… "We know best because we are government, and know whats best for everyone." ……NOPE!! …Don't just assume what you know. >:|

I really hate it when they try to pass something so dumb, trying to control the internet, if its not controlling the internet its putting stupid blocks and things in they way to make it more annoying. They just can't leave the Internet be, it doesn't need controlled regulations. I really hope FCC beat this back hard. Verizon is dumb to even think that as a business ISP to want to even propose adding extra costs based on sites users visit or do on the internet.

You do realize that the FCC is an independent agency of the government, right? What's happening here is this part of the government is fighting big business (Verizon et al) in the US court system, which is a different ballgame because it's also fighting different parts of itself. You WANT regulation of these companies in this case, otherwise pricing systems and lack of competition can quickly get out of control, which hurts consumers and smaller companies across the spectrum.

I don't want to make this thread about a lesson in government, but it's not inherently a bad thing... however you can't bash the government and then in the same breath wish for the FCC to beat this back. It's all government.

Runefox
01-22-2014, 03:40 PM
I really hate it when they try to pass something so dumb, trying to control the internet, if its not controlling the internet its putting stupid blocks and things in they way to make it more annoying. They just can't leave the Internet be, it doesn't need controlled regulations. I really hope FCC beat this back hard. Verizon is dumb to even think that as a business ISP to want to even propose adding extra costs based on sites users visit or do on the internet.

This isn't a government thing, it's a corporate lobbying thing. It's because there was no regulation to begin with that this case came to court, and now a major battle has been lost in the net neutrality debate. ISP's have been wanting to end net neutrality for a long time because open access to the internet at a flat rate isn't raking in enough dough to make them happy. The end result of being legally able to discriminate against internet traffic and meter it accordingly is that both consumers and internet companies will be paying; The consumer to access websites above and beyond their flat internet rate, and companies to have their sites included in plans at prime rates.