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DinosaurDammit
01-11-2014, 02:17 PM
So I am looking for help on shading this. no nudity but its implied i guesss http://imgur.com/mMMTSUw

crude after edit to show light source. I am trying to put nebula in the background. also I would love to know how lingrimm gets their lines so tiny and their pictures so "airy". I feel like that would do this thing justice. Could i have a little help trying to redline the shading points. I am going to use somewhat of an aquaish light because the nebuals and stars are that color. Shading the hair and wings is my biggest crux. Im also trying to figure out how to imply that there is a surface she is sitting on- like a cloud. But im running out of ideas.

thanks for looking and thanks for help

Tiamat
01-11-2014, 05:21 PM
I don't know who lingrimm is, but I will try to give you some ideas.

I would ditch the existing colors and get rid of that background. The colors as they are at the moment, combined with that rendered background are not going to make your job any easier.
Start from the linework and work your way from the front to back. Before you start laying down the color, choose a simple palette, in this case you said you want an aquiash light? So I would suggest a cooler color grouping. When I'm in doubt, I turn to the contemporary masters in traditional painting, such as James Gurney:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2010/09/clouds-growth-and-dispersion.html
http://painting.about.com/od/howtopaintcloudsandsky/ss/paint-clouds.htm

Study images of clouds, remembering they are objects themselves which cast their own shadows as well as disperse light. Keep your brushes hard, but choose different shapes for the clouds. I like to experiment until something works and play around with the smudge tool for stuff like that.

Another reason I suggest dropping the colour and going back to the lines is that your figure is in an awkward area composition wise. Traditionally we view a painting from left to right. At the moment your subject matter is sitting at the very edge of the left hand side of the painting, which will lead the viewers eyes right back out again. Putting them closer to the right edge will make the picture easier to read.

Here are some basic tips on rendering a figure in relation to cast light

http://i1209.photobucket.com/albums/cc388/Tenebraestudios/4f9e47cf5943be868445f0ba009fbf3d_zps804a5ef9.jpg (http://s1209.photobucket.com/user/Tenebraestudios/media/4f9e47cf5943be868445f0ba009fbf3d_zps804a5ef9.jpg.h tml)

Keep it simple, pick a limited amount of colors and stick to them. Use their value range to help discern the form and it will help give the image a unified look.

DinosaurDammit
01-12-2014, 12:58 PM
I don't know who lingrimm is, but I will try to give you some ideas.

I would ditch the existing colors and get rid of that background. The colors as they are at the moment, combined with that rendered background are not going to make your job any easier.
Start from the linework and work your way from the front to back. Before you start laying down the color, choose a simple palette, in this case you said you want an aquiash light? So I would suggest a cooler color grouping. When I'm in doubt, I turn to the contemporary masters in traditional painting, such as James Gurney:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2010/09/clouds-growth-and-dispersion.html
http://painting.about.com/od/howtopaintcloudsandsky/ss/paint-clouds.htm

Study images of clouds, remembering they are objects themselves which cast their own shadows as well as disperse light. Keep your brushes hard, but choose different shapes for the clouds. I like to experiment until something works and play around with the smudge tool for stuff like that.

Another reason I suggest dropping the colour and going back to the lines is that your figure is in an awkward area composition wise. Traditionally we view a painting from left to right. At the moment your subject matter is sitting at the very edge of the left hand side of the painting, which will lead the viewers eyes right back out again. Putting them closer to the right edge will make the picture easier to read.

Here are some basic tips on rendering a figure in relation to cast light

http://i1209.photobucket.com/albums/cc388/Tenebraestudios/4f9e47cf5943be868445f0ba009fbf3d_zps804a5ef9.jpg (http://s1209.photobucket.com/user/Tenebraestudios/media/4f9e47cf5943be868445f0ba009fbf3d_zps804a5ef9.jpg.h tml)

Keep it simple, pick a limited amount of colors and stick to them. Use their value range to help discern the form and it will help give the image a unified look.


what is a color grouping? Ive never done formal art and i am trying to break bad habits and learn more.

QT Melon
01-12-2014, 01:09 PM
Color grouping is the act of putting together color palettes that match what you wanted to do. So you start building "swatches" or colors based upon your picture. That way instead of wondering what color you put down, you have a set you have to work with. You want to experiment a bit to see how they relate to each other. Sometimes a dark blue you may choose may be too stark with with the other colors you have chosen.

If you are doing traditional painting this helps cut back on wasting time and paints, because you have pre-planned what palette you will use. In digital, while you have the whole range of colors digitally, it does help cut down on time wasting on being indecisive as to what colors you have used. Working with a more limited range of colors and looking at what hues make good shadows help, instead of having to try to tint and shade with black as well. It is not that you don't use either color at all but learning to work with and mix colors without those hues can make you learn how to use color.

I also remember you having issues with being color blind, so having a color wheel with the names laid out will help greatly.
http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/IMG/cw12.gif
http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/IMG/cw12.gif

He has a larger color wheel on his site which helps with names greatly if someone is using traditional paint names.

DinosaurDammit
01-12-2014, 01:13 PM
Color grouping is the act of putting together color palettes that match what you wanted to do. So you start building "swatches" or colors based upon your picture. That way instead of wondering what color you put down, you have a set you have to work with. You want to experiment a bit to see how they relate to each other. Sometimes a dark blue you may choose may be too stark with with the other colors you have chosen.

something like this? or more advanced? http://i.imgur.com/qWRwIpU.jpg i did a set of colors i was going to use but i feel that this might the wrong "color grouping"

QT Melon
01-12-2014, 01:18 PM
From what I can see you have some colors grouped too close together which will make it harder for shadows and highlights...let me see if I can help with some swatches

DinosaurDammit
01-12-2014, 01:19 PM
From what I can see you have some colors grouped too close together which will make it harder for shadows and highlights...let me see if I can help with some swatches

that would be awesome! thank you

QT Melon
01-12-2014, 02:20 PM
Would this be useful? You are free to change the colors you want. I added a bit of warmth for the skin tones.

http://i.imgur.com/dqy4Aby.jpg

DinosaurDammit
01-13-2014, 12:05 PM
Would this be useful? You are free to change the colors you want. I added a bit of warmth for the skin tones.

http://i.imgur.com/dqy4Aby.jpg

thats perfect! i wouldnt have thought to use so many different colors, now- how should I lay my base colors down? Start with the most neutral and shade with the rest or?

QT Melon
01-13-2014, 04:33 PM
You can work in a way that feels comfortable to you. If you want to go light to dark or vice versa that is up to you. You can also go middle out. But you just want to make sure you have the colors laid out wide before trying to do details if I am making sense? Large areas first then slowly go in with details.

One thing to keep in mind is that if you decide to do details in one area leave less details out to counterbalance. If say you are putting a lot of details in areas that are lit, don't put in much details in areas of shadow. The reverse is also true.