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Inky
12-18-2013, 05:10 AM
Anyone here genderfluid? I always like looking for more people who identify as such!

"Gender Fluid is a gender identity best described as a dynamic mix of boy and girl. A person who is Gender Fluid may always feel like a mix of the two traditional genders, but may feel more boy some days, and more girl other days. Being Gender Fluid has nothing to do with which set of genitalia one has, nor their sexual orientation."
That's a quote to better explain what it is, for those who may not know or may not understand at first!

There is also this handy picture I found:
http://gyazo.com/4ef542d65f318fb91fd1b7ff960a26a2.png
http://itspronouncedmetrosexual.com/2012/03/the-genderbread-person-v2-0/

Come hang out and chat, and talk about your experiences dealing your your gender fluidity!
Please, no drama in this thread, I want people to feel safe!

coyttl
12-18-2013, 02:47 PM
As someone that works in the DC area, our subway is called the 'Metro'. The website name ('metrosexual') gives a whole different (and not really *pleasant*) ideas. :)

Inky
12-18-2013, 10:32 PM
The very understandable, oh my gosh!

coyttl
12-19-2013, 01:38 PM
The very understandable, oh my gosh!

It's not bad, mind you! Just had to explain why, when I saw/'read that, I shuddered. ..Ew. :) I doubt that the population of DC, USA would be enough to warrant a change.. :)

Inky
12-20-2013, 05:36 AM
It's not bad, mind you! Just had to explain why, when I saw/'read that, I shuddered. ..Ew. :) I doubt that the population of DC, USA would be enough to warrant a change.. :)

Haha, true. I actually don't even know where the term metrosexual came from, but I've heard it for a long time now! Maybe that's something I should research!

coyttl
12-20-2013, 02:44 PM
Haha, true. I actually don't even know where the term metrosexual came from, but I've heard it for a long time now! Maybe that's something I should research!

Would be interested to see what you find, honestly. :)

Inky
12-22-2013, 05:54 PM
Would be interested to see what you find, honestly. :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrosexual#Origin

I guess that's that!

Ongaku
12-22-2013, 10:02 PM
I dont feel more boy or girl on one particular day, but i find certain ways i think are more masculine than feminine and sometimes my thought process on other subjects are more feminine than masculine :3

Identity isnt at the forefront of my brain, im just me.

BlissfulOblivion
01-03-2014, 07:24 PM
I'm genderfluid! <: I tend a little bit towards female and agender, but I definitely have my man days. Although I just don't care enough about how people perceive my gender to explicitly say so unless asked. I generally just roll with whatever gender people assign to me. Plus that makes them more comfortable, which is always a good thing. And we don't really take gender seriously anymore unless you're in a conservative culture where there are specific roles and customs prescribed to genders. I mean, the most serious thing that comes with gender any more is how relationships function, and with the LGBT movement even that is slowly starting to break down. And how we dress, I suppose. Those are the big two. My experience with social interactions kind of comes down to what the person is like, and I've found men who are more feminine than some of my female friends, but they each identify as their respective gender; thus, I kind of don't really regard gender as all that meaningful any more unless the other person finds it to be so.

Ruggy
01-03-2014, 10:57 PM
Not sure if I count, here, but I'm horrendously uncomfortable with feminine clothing (I unfortunately prefer clothing that would look much better on me if I didn't have friggin' curves everywhere) and have been very attracted to the idea of coming up with a drag king persona for some time now. (Mostly I want to frost my tips, put on heinously 90's clothing, and dance to Backstreet's Back. Don't judge meeee.)

But I do still like makeup and shaped eyebrows, so. I think I just want to be David Bowie, is what's going on.

I've never felt particularly like being a dude or anything, but I definitely like to toe the line of androgyny with how I present myself.

BlissfulOblivion
01-03-2014, 11:01 PM
Not sure if I count, here, but I'm horrendously uncomfortable with feminine clothing (I unfortunately prefer clothing that would look much better on me if I didn't have friggin' curves everywhere) and have been very attracted to the idea of coming up with a drag king persona for some time now. (Mostly I want to frost my tips, put on heinously 90's clothing, and dance to Backstreet's Back. Don't judge meeee.)

But I do still like makeup and shaped eyebrows, so. I think I just want to be David Bowie, is what's going on.

I've never felt particularly like being a dude or anything, but I definitely like to toe the line of androgyny with how I present myself.

I've never heard the expression "frost my tips." :I What does that mean?

And I feel like a lot of people present themselves with androgyny whether they mean to or not. It more comes down to how you feel, yourself.

Ruggy
01-03-2014, 11:09 PM
I've never heard the expression "frost my tips." :I What does that mean?

And I feel like a lot of people present themselves with androgyny whether they mean to or not. It more comes down to how you feel, yourself.

Means bleaching the tips of your hair (http://i.imgur.com/jKhvVeC.jpg), because you are an inexplicable teen icon in the 90's. P:

I've just always felt more comfortable with male modes of dress. Which is, granted, easier for a lady to decide she wants to do than a dude to decide he wants to do, which is a crying shame. But, I dunno. Anything that draws too much attention to me being female, I don't like. I'm not sure if that's plain ol' body dysmorphia or just me being more comfortable wearing dude-clothes, but eh. Whatever it is, I'd be a lot more comfortable in a tailored tux than I would any dress.

"That just means you're a butch dyke, c'mon man." P:

BlissfulOblivion
01-03-2014, 11:15 PM
Means bleaching the tips of your hair (http://i.imgur.com/jKhvVeC.jpg), because you are an inexplicable teen icon in the 90's. P:

I've just always felt more comfortable with male modes of dress. Which is, granted, easier for a lady to decide she wants to do than a dude to decide he wants to do, which is a crying shame. But, I dunno. Anything that draws too much attention to me being female, I don't like. I'm not sure if that's plain ol' body dysmorphia or just me being more comfortable wearing dude-clothes, but eh. Whatever it is, I'd be a lot more comfortable in a tailored tux than I would any dress.

"That just means you're a butch dyke, c'mon man." P:

Oooh! I have seen that! Okay <: I just tend to not know the names of things.

:U I just wear guy clothes because they tend to be so much more comfortable than girl clothes. And if you wear the right ones, you can feel feminine anyway <:
Although it's kind of true that it's much easier for girls to wear guy clothes without being called out for it than the reverse :c It's rather disappointing.
(slight tangent) When I was younger my mum wouldn't let me dress as a girl or paint my fingernails because she was afraid I would get picked on :c

Ruggy
01-03-2014, 11:20 PM
Oooh! I have seen that! Okay <: I just tend to not know the names of things.

:U I just wear guy clothes because they tend to be so much more comfortable than girl clothes. And if you wear the right ones, you can feel feminine anyway <:
Although it's kind of true that it's much easier for girls to wear guy clothes without being called out for it than the reverse :c It's rather disappointing.
(slight tangent) When I was younger my mum wouldn't let me dress as a girl or paint my fingernails because she was afraid I would get picked on :c

Guy clothes have pockets. Like, real damn pockets, that I can put actual things in. I'm just sad that my hips don't lie and I look horrible in men's jeans, because dem pockets. I hate carrying purses or bags, and only girl-jeans really fit me, so I'm stuck stuffing a wallet, phone, and keys in stupid tiny pockets that don't deserve the name. >:I

It is disappointing. :[ I've got a guy friend who wears a skirt in public, and my dad wears dresses to orchestra rehearsals, so, that's at least two guys I know who ain't got time for that prejudice nonsense, at least! But yeah, total BS and guys should 100% be able to wear skirts and carry cute purses without people giving them lip. Being girly is no reason to think less of someone, even if you yourself don't care for it.

Awww. Honestly, most kids don't seem to really care. Any kids who do care only do so because their parents taught them to. And so it continues.

BlissfulOblivion
01-03-2014, 11:29 PM
Guy clothes have pockets. Like, real damn pockets, that I can put actual things in. I'm just sad that my hips don't lie and I look horrible in men's jeans, because dem pockets. I hate carrying purses or bags, and only girl-jeans really fit me, so I'm stuck stuffing a wallet, phone, and keys in stupid tiny pockets that don't deserve the name. >:I

It is disappointing. :[ I've got a guy friend who wears a skirt in public, and my dad wears dresses to orchestra rehearsals, so, that's at least two guys I know who ain't got time for that prejudice nonsense, at least! But yeah, total BS and guys should 100% be able to wear skirts and carry cute purses without people giving them lip. Being girly is no reason to think less of someone, even if you yourself don't care for it.

Awww. Honestly, most kids don't seem to really care. Any kids who do care only do so because their parents taught them to. And so it continues.

This is a true thing. I agree with all of that. My body is not made for most pants :C But pockets! I always took them for granted. LOL that reminds me that whenever I go to performances, my tux has sooooooo many damn pockets that I am assigned "phone carrier" since the rest of the small ensemble is girls. I have like 10 pockets, all able to carry at least 3 phones and then change :U

That's awesome! <: Go those dudes!

This is true. I would be a girl to all of my friends when I was young and none of them cared. <: It was pretty great. Kids are wonderful in that regard. And people are getting better about everything so kids are too! <:

Krespo
01-07-2014, 11:55 AM
Dude clothes are the best! And they are not just for dudes anymore. That genderbread person has captivated me and I must endorse any information spread through a bread pun.

JiJi
01-07-2014, 01:36 PM
Dude clothes are the best! And they are not just for dudes anymore. That genderbread person has captivated me and I must endorse any information spread through a bread pun.

I prefer womens skinny jeans :p
Just as hard to get on and off when you have man feet, and the pockets suck ass (especially with a samsung S3,)
but they're cheaper than mens jeans!

Littlerock
01-07-2014, 03:38 PM
I kind of fit here! I use female pronouns, and dress mostly male, but most of the time I feel agender. Once in a while, I have a boy day, and occasionally a girl day.

To save hassle, I just go by female though :p

Matt Conner
01-07-2014, 03:46 PM
I'm definitely -not- genderfluid, although I don't really believe there should be any gender archetypes anyways. As far as I'm concerned, the term "gender" stops at biological gender, and everything else about you has to do with you as an individual, and not what type of junk you were born with or think you shoulda been born with. The idea that you have to be a girl or at least feel "girly" or visa versa to like certain things just kinda propagates the idea that men and women are fundamentally unequal. (I don't mean "different" mind you, of course men and women are different. That's just biology, both the additional parts and the different levels of hormones that naturally occur in us).

forgive me if I'm coming off ignorant, I tend to take a scientific standpoint when it comes to things like this, and that's always just the way I've seen it, yaknow?

Ruggy
01-07-2014, 04:04 PM
I'm definitely -not- genderfluid, although I don't really believe there should be any gender archetypes anyways. As far as I'm concerned, the term "gender" stops at biological gender, and everything else about you has to do with you as an individual, and not what type of junk you were born with or think you shoulda been born with. The idea that you have to be a girl or at least feel "girly" or visa versa to like certain things just kinda propagates the idea that men and women are fundamentally unequal. (I don't mean "different" mind you, of course men and women are different. That's just biology, both the additional parts and the different levels of hormones that naturally occur in us).

forgive me if I'm coming off ignorant, I tend to take a scientific standpoint when it comes to things like this, and that's always just the way I've seen it, yaknow?

The way it's usually defined in the queer community is that 'sex' is one's biological sex, which requires hormones and surgery to affect (if it can be - surgery for Female-to-Male is unfortunately limited), and 'gender' is mental. So one could be born biologically female, but feel mentally male and fundamentally uncomfortable in a female body. It's a real thing that happens.

I kind of agree that rigid definitions of What Is Female and What Is Male are sorta funked, but there are absolutely people who aren't happy with their biological sex. You can be a transman or a transwoman without pursuing hormonal treatment or surgery for it, though many do, if they can afford it, and are invariably happier for it from what I've seen. Some choose not to (there's a singer I'm thinking of who chose not to take testosterone because it would affect his singing voice) but that doesn't change their identities.

Mostly I'm not about to disrespect someone who tells me to use female pronouns just because her name was "Richard" when I met her or something, or tell her that she could be girly and still be a man. If she is not a man as far as she is concerned, I'm not going to think of her as one. Trans people get enough shit without me adding to it.

piņardilla
01-07-2014, 04:13 PM
I'm definitely -not- genderfluid, although I don't really believe there should be any gender archetypes anyways. As far as I'm concerned, the term "gender" stops at biological gender, and everything else about you has to do with you as an individual, and not what type of junk you were born with or think you shoulda been born with. The idea that you have to be a girl or at least feel "girly" or visa versa to like certain things just kinda propagates the idea that men and women are fundamentally unequal. (I don't mean "different" mind you, of course men and women are different. That's just biology, both the additional parts and the different levels of hormones that naturally occur in us).

forgive me if I'm coming off ignorant, I tend to take a scientific standpoint when it comes to things like this, and that's always just the way I've seen it, yaknow?

I wouldn't call it a scientific standpoint when you haven't taken a scientific approach to understanding it. Biology is squishy, and while the distribution of gender is certainly strongly bimodal by evolutionary design (if it can even be described as a continuum as the first place), people can and do naturally fall away from those norms.

Having to be "girly" to like certain things is also completely unrelated, just look at the My Little Pony explosion on the internet over the past couple of years.

Ruggy
01-07-2014, 04:17 PM
I wouldn't call it a scientific standpoint when you haven't taken a scientific approach to understanding it. Biology is squishy, and while the distribution of gender is certainly strongly bimodal by evolutionary design (if it can even be described as a continuum as the first place), people can and do naturally fall away from those norms.

And that's not even approaching people who are intersex (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intersex). Granted, it's not frequent, but that's an even squishier case for those who just knee-jerk say, "well, you have a dick, so you're a dude, even if you're a girly dude." (Which is an attitude that is depressingly easy to come across.)

Matt Conner
01-07-2014, 04:27 PM
Wow, I really can't iterate my thoughts today...plus I'm not that knowledgeable on this particular subject anyhow. Qlright, disregard most of what I posted previously, what I'm trying to say is: If you say you're a man who identifies as a woman, you're still putting yourself in a mold. Why not just be a person who digs dresses and makeup?

Ruggy
01-07-2014, 04:46 PM
Wow, I really can't iterate my thoughts today...plus I'm not that knowledgeable on this particular subject anyhow. Qlright, disregard most of what I posted previously, what I'm trying to say is: If you say you're a man who identifies as a woman, you're still putting yourself in a mold. Why not just be a person who digs dresses and makeup?

I've met a few transwomen who still dress in jeans and t-shirts like they did before coming out/transitioning. A lot will go for dresses and makeup to embrace who they've always felt they should be, but not everyone does. I also know (and am related to) men who dig dresses and makeup and just identify as guys who dig dresses and makeup.

It just goes a lot deeper than clothes and other external signifiers of gender.

I think it's honestly a case of not knowing what someone else's life experience is like. Coming out as trans and transitioning to your real gender is fucking hard. As few legal protections as gay/lesbian/bisexual people have, trans have even fewer (they're not even guaranteed housing - people have been evicted for this). Hormonal therapy is expensive, reassignment surgery is astronomically expensive, and the process of getting it can take years before doctors will even consider it.

Suicide rates (http://www.livescience.com/11208-high-suicide-risk-prejudice-plague-transgender-people.html) for trans people are through the roof, violence against trans people is even higher than against gay people (http://www.glaad.org/blog/ncavp-report-2012-hate-violence-disproportionately-target-transgender-women-color), and even among the queer community, there's a lot of prejudice against trans people.

Given all that, if someone who was born a man says, "Please use female pronouns for me, and use this name," I just find it incredibly disrespectful to doubt their life experience just because it doesn't match up with your own. If they're risking being killed just for being transgender, it's obviously important. It's something so critical to themselves that to risk death by violence is less stressful than to keep it in.

I can't say I understand it 100% either, but I am not trans, and I won't purport to tell them how they should identify based on my understanding.

Reading things written by trans people (like this (http://christenbustani.blogspot.com/p/what-is-it-like-to-be-transgendered.html) or this (http://www.entirelyamelia.com/2013/11/25/transgender-transitioning-doesnt-make-brave-courageous/)) can help, but really, if it's not something that applies to you, the odds of ever really understanding it are pretty low. Respect is the best we can aim for.

Matt Conner
01-07-2014, 04:49 PM
I've met a few transwomen who still dress in jeans and t-shirts like they did before coming out/transitioning. A lot will go for dresses and makeup to embrace who they've always felt they should be, but not everyone does. I also know (and am related to) men who dig dresses and makeup and just identify as guys who dig dresses and makeup.

It just goes a lot deeper than clothes and other external signifiers of gender.

I think it's honestly a case of not knowing what someone else's life experience is like. Coming out as trans and transitioning to your real gender is fucking hard. As few legal protections as gay/lesbian/bisexual people have, trans have even fewer (they're not even guaranteed housing - people have been evicted for this). Hormonal therapy is expensive, reassignment surgery is astronomically expensive, and the process of getting it can take years before doctors will even consider it.

Suicide rates (http://www.livescience.com/11208-high-suicide-risk-prejudice-plague-transgender-people.html) for trans people are through the roof, violence against trans people is even higher than against gay people (http://www.glaad.org/blog/ncavp-report-2012-hate-violence-disproportionately-target-transgender-women-color), and even among the queer community, there's a lot of prejudice against trans people.

Given all that, if someone who was born a man says, "Please use female pronouns for me, and use this name," I just find it incredibly disrespectful to doubt their life experience just because it doesn't match up with your own. If they're risking being killed just for being transgender, it's obviously important. It's something so critical to themselves that to risk death by violence is less stressful than to keep it in.

I can't say I understand it 100% either, but I am not trans, and I won't purport to tell them how they should identify based on my understanding.

Reading things written by trans people (like this (http://christenbustani.blogspot.com/p/what-is-it-like-to-be-transgendered.html) or this (http://www.entirelyamelia.com/2013/11/25/transgender-transitioning-doesnt-make-brave-courageous/)) can help, but really, if it's not something that applies to you, the odds of ever really understanding it are pretty low. Respect is the best we can aim for.

That makes sense! I appreciate you enlightening me on the subject. By the way, I used dresses and makeup just as a for instance, my point was: why even prescribe to gender stereotypes at all? When you say man, woman, male, female or something in-between, it still comes with an expected set of things you should like or dislike, at least according to society.

Ruggy
01-07-2014, 05:08 PM
That makes sense! I appreciate you enlightening me on the subject. By the way, I used dresses and makeup just as a for instance, my point was: why even prescribe to gender stereotypes at all? When you say man, woman, male, female or something in-between, it still comes with an expected set of things you should like or dislike, at least according to society.

Eh, some folks don't prescribe to gender stereotypes. More folks do. I'd agree that by and large those definitions hold us back, too. (Ain't nothin' wrong with a dude talking about his feelings, seriously, the hell.)

Just because ascribing things to a certain gender ("this is a girl thing" "this is a boy thing") is kind of silly doesn't mean that it's easy to just... opt-out, for everyone, though. Some people do, and some folks don't identify as any gender at all, but it's a decision that is going to receive a lot of pushback. Deciding that 'girl things' and 'boy things' doesn't mean anything to you, unfortunately, doesn't erase the fact that society at large still holds those definitions, and you're now in the position of having to defend that, whether you want to or not.

Pretty much, I guess what I'm saying is ideally, yeah, basic things like clothing choice or preferred activities should have no inherent gender connotation, and the more people who do what they want without giving a shit, the better. 'Boy-things' and 'girl-things' does denote exclusion, and that's stupid.

But ignoring the fact that preconceived notions of gender are A Thing for a lot of people isn't going to do much good either, and there are some people who don't feel like they should have to be a gender-neutrality-crusader (which, unfortunately, deciding 'gender doesn't decide what you like or do,' and living by that, kind of makes you, at least in the US).

It is silly. :/

BlissfulOblivion
01-07-2014, 05:41 PM
That makes sense! I appreciate you enlightening me on the subject. By the way, I used dresses and makeup just as a for instance, my point was: why even prescribe to gender stereotypes at all? When you say man, woman, male, female or something in-between, it still comes with an expected set of things you should like or dislike, at least according to society.

There can definitely be cases in which the point of it is to fit the stereotype or mold, specifically because it feels good for some reason. Sometimes that reason is simply to have a place that you feel like a part of something (which is common in people still trying to sort out identity; and especially common in younger people who are unsure of who they are and are looking for somewhere to fit in. This occasionally manifests as people trying to be gay even though they're not, although I'm not sure how common that is). Sometimes it's just easier to fit a mold and the people don't necessarily care all that much. I'm not sure exactly how common all this is but it definitely happens.

Ruggy
01-07-2014, 05:58 PM
There can definitely be cases in which the point of it is to fit the stereotype or mold, specifically because it feels good for some reason. Sometimes that reason is simply to have a place that you feel like a part of something (which is common in people still trying to sort out identity; and especially common in younger people who are unsure of who they are and are looking for somewhere to fit in. This occasionally manifests as people trying to be gay even though they're not, although I'm not sure how common that is). Sometimes it's just easier to fit a mold and the people don't necessarily care all that much. I'm not sure exactly how common all this is but it definitely happens.

I'm trying to think about this. Because I will definitely have days where I'll revel in doing girly shit because it's girly, or dude shit because it makes me feel pleasantly butch or something. And thinking of some guy having a man-night where he just sits down with a few brewskies and watches the game with buddies, or a girls-night that's all fruity drinks and fancy clothes with your main ladies, I don't necessarily see the harm in taking joy in the gendered aspects of that, but... That is kind of exclusionary, still.

And I know a lot of guys just aren't interested in going out on a ladies-night type of ordeal, and a lot of women couldn't care less about sports (I am one of them), and I don't necessarily see a problem with saying, "these are things that [gender] tends to like to do and it is okay to like them for that reason" except for how easily that morphs into saying, "these are things that [gender] does, and to be outside of that is abnormal."

As arbitrary as it is to say, "this is a man sort of thing, that men like to do," it only starts to make my feelings really itchy when it goes further to say, "if you do not behave this way, you are less of a man; and women can't do it properly, either." It seems like one follows the other so easily, though.

And then there's the glee of transgressing some gender taboo, too, which has its own appeal, despite recognizing that really these things shouldn't be taboo at all.

I've been hovering in queer spaces, reading queer lit, talking with queer folks, dating queer folks, and being one myself for a few years now, and this stuff still makes me dizzy to think too much about. (Not that I claim to be any kind of great thinker, though.)

These definitions of gender may be learned, but hoo boy, do they go deep.

Willow
01-07-2014, 06:11 PM
That makes sense! I appreciate you enlightening me on the subject. By the way, I used dresses and makeup just as a for instance, my point was: why even prescribe to gender stereotypes at all? When you say man, woman, male, female or something in-between, it still comes with an expected set of things you should like or dislike, at least according to society.
And society is a big doo doo head. Regardless of what you identify as, you shouldn't let society dictate what you have to do.

OT: I tried being gender fluid but I don't think it really fit me because I identified as male 99.9% of the time anyways. However, I do have friends who identify as fluid.

Matt Conner
01-07-2014, 06:37 PM
And society is a big doo doo head. Regardless of what you identify as, you shouldn't let society dictate what you have to do.

OT: I tried being gender fluid but I don't think it really fit me because I identified as male 99.9% of the time anyways. However, I do have friends who identify as fluid.

right! So you shouldn't play by their rules! Fuck genders, man~

BlissfulOblivion
01-07-2014, 07:27 PM
I'm trying to think about this. Because I will definitely have days where I'll revel in doing girly shit because it's girly, or dude shit because it makes me feel pleasantly butch or something. And thinking of some guy having a man-night where he just sits down with a few brewskies and watches the game with buddies, or a girls-night that's all fruity drinks and fancy clothes with your main ladies, I don't necessarily see the harm in taking joy in the gendered aspects of that, but... That is kind of exclusionary, still.

And I know a lot of guys just aren't interested in going out on a ladies-night type of ordeal, and a lot of women couldn't care less about sports (I am one of them), and I don't necessarily see a problem with saying, "these are things that [gender] tends to like to do and it is okay to like them for that reason" except for how easily that morphs into saying, "these are things that [gender] does, and to be outside of that is abnormal."

As arbitrary as it is to say, "this is a man sort of thing, that men like to do," it only starts to make my feelings really itchy when it goes further to say, "if you do not behave this way, you are less of a man; and women can't do it properly, either." It seems like one follows the other so easily, though.

And then there's the glee of transgressing some gender taboo, too, which has its own appeal, despite recognizing that really these things shouldn't be taboo at all.

I've been hovering in queer spaces, reading queer lit, talking with queer folks, dating queer folks, and being one myself for a few years now, and this stuff still makes me dizzy to think too much about. (Not that I claim to be any kind of great thinker, though.)

These definitions of gender may be learned, but hoo boy, do they go deep.

The world is too complicated. We need to, like, simplify it somehow. It's so much work. Maybe we should kill all the humans? It would solve the issue of human rights. And help fix the climate, too :V

My horribly distasteful joke aside, yeah. It's really really complicated. My problem with prescribed gender rolls is when they're burnt gender roles is when they're forced upon others. Aside from that, I feel like it's fine to attribute certain things to certain genders. I think. I don't even know any more :c
It's also really frustrating when people try to come up with quick solutions to all of it when they only take one aspect of it into consideration.
But. It's so hard to think about :c

Zerig
01-07-2014, 11:59 PM
Sometimes when I get too excited my genderfluid gets all over my pants.

It leaves such awful stains ;~;

Dreaming
01-08-2014, 12:28 AM
meh, I've identified with genderfluid for a few years now... it fits and it's comfortable

Saiko
01-08-2014, 03:17 AM
I get the impression that I'm best described as androgynous and apathetic... I don't quite behave according to either, nor do I actively identify as either; but I have a penis so male is the default in mine and everyone else's mind.

BlissfulOblivion
01-08-2014, 03:20 AM
I get the impression that I'm best described as androgynous and apathetic... I don't quite behave according to either, nor do I actively identify as either; but I have a penis so male is the default in mine and everyone else's mind.

This is how I function in society even though I feel somewhat different.

Carnau
01-11-2014, 04:31 PM
I want to say I'm Gender queer but HEAVILY gravitating towards the masculinity in me and because of this I had identified as trans for a long time. It doesnt phase me.
I came out to my family in 2013 and they're okay with it, but my mom still seems to think I want to go girly-clothes shopping with her as if I'm just going through a phase. I'm 23.

Tica
01-11-2014, 04:41 PM
I'm a gender non-conformist. I identify as cis-female, but I refuse to follow society's proscribed roles for women. I have a feminine side--I like exotic flowers, babies, cute things. I also have a masculine side--I hate shopping, don't wear makeup, prefer superheroes to princesses, and so forth. I feel like most people have a mix of feminine and masculine inside them, but some people are more willing to acknowledge it than others.

Krespo
01-11-2014, 04:46 PM
I have a feminine side--I like exotic flowers, babies, cute things. I also have a masculine side--I hate shopping, don't wear makeup, prefer superheroes to princesses, and so forth.

None of those things are gender-specific :/

Matt Conner
01-11-2014, 05:22 PM
None of those things are gender-specific :/

According to society they are, which I think is her point. Think stereotypical guy/girl.

Tica
01-11-2014, 08:26 PM
None of those things are gender-specific :/

Of course they aren't. But society thinks they are, for some reason.

Worry
01-19-2014, 04:26 PM
HEY INKY. It's meeee, Astron/Inkjet/Inkie from Furcadia. ;u;

I've also only recently realized I identify with being genderfluid myself. >u<

tatters
01-19-2014, 05:38 PM
Nothing really is gender-specific outside the context of your culture but I think gender has more to do with like, how you see/think about yourself. I think a lot of it has to do with how society perceives your behavior too though, so it's okay to be like "I like boy/girl things"! Since those are the expectations that your society puts on you.

I'd say I'm genderfluid but I gravitate towards feminine most of the time, since I prefer female pronouns. I'm not perfectly 50/50 genderfluid but I like feeling like a boy sometimes too~*Or somewhere in between.

Infestissumam
01-19-2014, 06:40 PM
I don't believe gender matters, so I don't worry about it. I don't know if that counts as genderfluid, though.

Dspki
01-19-2014, 10:06 PM
Hmm...while I do identify as a female I can't help but also be fluid with my gender. Perhaps genderfluid or maybe bigender. Or it could be androgynous. I don't know really. I'm just...there. Sometimes I dress very feminine and embrace my femininity but other times I just don't care and I dress comfortably with mostly t-shirts passed down from my dad.

Claribelle
01-21-2014, 05:47 PM
I've never been a feminine person, even if I had lots of pressure from my mom at some points of my life, but ever since I moved out and started learning about the different gender identities, I think I've come to realize that I'm somewhere between genderfluid and gender neutral. I just have a hard time figuring out why I should care about gender (being pansexual I really have no preference) and I recently started using neutral pronouns for me and it feels right. Sadly, I live in the french part of Canada and french has no neutral pronouns, even inanimate objects have gendered pronouns :I

Dezenerate
01-21-2014, 09:00 PM
I started being genderfluid ehhh...probably this time last year? March I think.

I just didn't feel that masculinity was right for me, but I don't feel being feminine works either. I like just the neutrality of it, as others have said, both with pronouns and how I think of myself. It feels relaxed and nice.

TheLexicon
01-22-2014, 02:06 AM
I am. I knew since I was seven, though I never admitted it to anyone, even myself. No one IRL knows. I am unworthy of having a gender.

AcidFuzz
01-24-2014, 12:30 AM
Yep, totally genderfluid. Some days it's more one way than the other, some days it's mix. It can get pretty dang frustrating bouncing between opposites :/ as well as relationship wise the other person is usually attracted to more one side of me than the other. Making the times I feel more the opposing way rather difficult to interact with that significant other.
But in the end, I'm always me and I love me.

Littlered
01-24-2014, 05:00 PM
I'll throw myself into the mix as well! I'm definitely genderfluid, have been for years. I do enjoy dressing 'girly' sometimes, but at the same time I love dressing 'masculine'. Depending on the day I'll either wear dresses or hate them, same with skirts, but I generally tend to dress in more male clothing like cargo shorts and baggy t-shirts. I also like to bind when I'm having male days (which thankfully is easy for me, because I have a small chest).